TSLA Dec 2019 320.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
0.9800
-0.9600 (-49.48%)
As of 12:42PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1.9400
Open1.4000
Bid0.9700
Ask0.9900
Strike320.00
Expiry date2019-12-27
Day's range0.9800 - 1.5000
Contract rangeN/A
Volume183
Open interest757
  • Tesla: The Year It Finally Meets Management Goals
    Zacks

    Tesla: The Year It Finally Meets Management Goals

    This year may be the first year that the company finally meets their lofty goals.

  • Reuters

    Tesla plans increasing imported Model 3 prices in China from January - sources

    U.S. electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc plans to increase prices of imported Model 3 vehicles in China in January, sources familiar with the matter said. Tesla plans to increase prices of imported Model 3 vehicles with longer range and those with performance function, which are currently priced at 439,900 yuan (£48,710.49) and 509,900 yuan, respectively. The move comes as Tesla, which is building a car plant in Shanghai, aims to deliver China-made Model 3 sedans, which are priced at 355,800 yuan, to customers before Jan. 25 next year.

  • Tesla plans increasing imported Model 3 prices in China from January: sources
    Reuters

    Tesla plans increasing imported Model 3 prices in China from January: sources

    U.S. electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc plans to increase prices of imported Model 3 vehicles in China in January, sources familiar with the matter said. Tesla plans to increase prices of imported Model 3 vehicles with longer range and those with performance function, which are currently priced at 439,900 yuan ($62,495.56) and 509,900 yuan, respectively. The move comes as Tesla, which is building a car plant in Shanghai, aims to deliver China-made Model 3 sedans, which are priced at 355,800 yuan, to customers before Jan. 25 next year.

  • Tesla's German plant to produce 500,000 cars a year - Bild
    Reuters

    Tesla's German plant to produce 500,000 cars a year - Bild

    Tesla plans to build 500,000 electric vehicles a year at its new factory on the outskirts of Berlin, Germany's Bild newspaper reported on Wednesday. Last month, Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk announced that a site in Gruenheide, Brandenburg, had been chosen to build Tesla Model 3 and Model Y vehicles. German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported that Tesla will invest up to 4 billion euros (£3.44 billion) in the plant.

  • Tesla's German plant to produce 500,000 cars a year: Bild
    Reuters

    Tesla's German plant to produce 500,000 cars a year: Bild

    Tesla plans to build 500,000 electric vehicles a year at its new factory on the outskirts of Berlin, Germany's Bild newspaper reported on Wednesday. Last month, Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk announced that a site in Gruenheide, Brandenburg, had been chosen to build Tesla Model 3 and Model Y vehicles. German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported that Tesla will invest up to 4 billion euros ($4.41 billion) in the plant.

  • Bloomberg

    Tesla’s German Factory to Produce 500,000 Cars a Year, Bild Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. aims to produce as many as 500,000 of its Model 3 and Model Y electric cars annually at its planned factory close to Berlin, Bild Zeitung reported.The carmaker will employ about 10,000 people at the site, which will occupy an area equivalent to 420 soccer fields, the newspaper said, citing initial plans for the factory, which shows a complete production line as well as testing facilities. Construction is set to start next year.Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk wants Germany to sweep away its notorious red tape to speed construction of the facility, avoiding the bureaucracy that’s held up building Berlin’s new airport. Economy Minister Peter Altmaier said this week that he will try to ease regulatory hurdles that may snag construction. “There’s a lot at stake” in Tesla’s plan, he said.After a slow start, electric-vehicle sales are picking up in Germany, overtaking Norway as Europe’s biggest market. Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government is targeting as many as 10 million electric cars on German roads by 2030 to help achieve carbon-reduction targets.To contact the reporter on this story: Brian Parkin in Berlin at bparkin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net, Chris Reiter, Iain RogersFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Has Tesla (TSLA) Outpaced Other Auto-Tires-Trucks Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Has Tesla (TSLA) Outpaced Other Auto-Tires-Trucks Stocks This Year?

    Is (TSLA) Outperforming Other Auto-Tires-Trucks Stocks This Year?

  • Zacks

    Stocks Take a Rest After Three Days of Gains

    Stocks Take a Rest After Three Days of Gains

  • Tesla, Eldorado Resorts, Dick's Sporting Goods, Gaming and Leisure Properties and Target highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Tesla, Eldorado Resorts, Dick's Sporting Goods, Gaming and Leisure Properties and Target highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Tesla, Eldorado Resorts, Dick???s Sporting Goods, Gaming and Leisure Properties and Target highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Bull of the Day: Tesla (TSLA)
    Zacks

    Bull of the Day: Tesla (TSLA)

    Bull of the Day: Tesla (TSLA)

  • Tesla on Autopilot Rear-Ends a Parked Cop Car in Connecticut
    Bloomberg

    Tesla on Autopilot Rear-Ends a Parked Cop Car in Connecticut

    (Bloomberg) -- Another Tesla Inc. vehicle operating on the carmaker’s driver-assistance system branded as Autopilot has crashed into a parked emergency vehicle, eliciting fresh warnings about the shortcomings of automated technology on public roads.A Tesla Model 3 sedan hit a parked police cruiser with its hazard lights flashing on a major highway near Norwalk, Connecticut, over the weekend. The collision occurred around 12:40 a.m. local time Saturday, when a highway-patrol vehicle stopped to assist a disabled SUV in the left-center lane of Interstate 95, according to a Connecticut State Police report.“When operating a vehicle your full attention is required at all times to ensure safe driving,” the state police wrote Saturday in a Facebook post. “Although a number of vehicles have some automated capabilities, there are no vehicles currently for sale that are fully automated or self-driving.”A similar incident last year in which a Tesla Model S slammed into the rear of a fire truck on a Southern California highway triggered an investigation by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. While neither crash resulted in injuries, both raise questions about the use and limitations of advanced driver-assist technology that can struggle to detect stationary objects.There’s no indication at this time that the NTSB’s Office of Highway Safety intends to investigate the latest crash, a spokesman for the agency said in an email. Representatives for Tesla didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.On Saturday, the 2018 Model 3 was traveling in the same lane as the parked police cruiser, which it hit before continuing on and damaging the bumper of the disabled Jeep. The rear end of the police cruiser and front end of the Model 3 sustained “heavy” damage, but the state trooper was outside the police car at the time of the accident, according to the police report.The driver of the Tesla told police his car’s Autopilot feature had been activated and he was not facing forward -- he was checking on his dog in the back seat, according to the state police’s Facebook post. Police issued him a ticket for first degree reckless driving and endangerment.Tesla releases quarterly reports that it says indicate drivers using Autopilot are safer than those operating without it. The company also has said the system repeatedly reminds drivers they are responsible for remaining attentive and prohibits the use of Autopilot when warnings are ignored.(Updates with NTSB spokesman’s comment in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Ryan Beene.To contact the reporter on this story: Chester Dawson in Southfield at cdawson54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, David WelchFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, Baidu, Lyft, Alibaba and Intel
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, Baidu, Lyft, Alibaba and Intel

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, Baidu, Lyft, Alibaba and Intel

  • Company News for Dec 9, 2019
    Zacks

    Company News for Dec 9, 2019

    Companies in the news are: ULTA, TSLA, UBER, YEXT

  • Video of Cybertruck driving on California highway reveals more questions
    TechCrunch

    Video of Cybertruck driving on California highway reveals more questions

    Elon Musk is purportedly driving, but it's not confirmed that he was behind the wheel while this video was filmed. According to U.S. regulations, passenger vehicles need to have a mirror inside and one on the driver’s side of the vehicle. When Musk unveiled the Cybertruck, he stated that the vehicle used a video camera for the rear-view camera, which is something other automakers are trying as well.

  • By Miles, the UK pay-by-mile car insurance app, adds 'connected car' policy for Tesla drivers
    TechCrunch

    By Miles, the UK pay-by-mile car insurance app, adds 'connected car' policy for Tesla drivers

    The new insurance product pulls real-time mileage information directly from a car owner's Tesla account and uses the distance they have driven to price their insurance each month. It claims to be the first car insurance policy to take data from a car without the need for a "black box" or aftermarket device. The new policy -- created in partnership with digital insurer La Parisienne Assurances (backed by Swiss Re) -- offers lower-mileage Tesla owners in the U.K. (those who drive less than 7,000 miles a year) the opportunity to save significantly on their annual car insurance, according to By Miles.

  • China’s Third-Richest Man Set for $2 Billion Evergrande Cash
    Bloomberg

    China’s Third-Richest Man Set for $2 Billion Evergrande Cash

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s third-richest man is set to get a $2 billion cash windfall.Hui Ka Yan, chairman of China Evergrande Group, will pocket the money after the property developer and electric-car wannabe declared a record dividend for fiscal 2018.The board proposed a 1.42 yuan per-share payout for the year ended Dec. 31, according to a statement late Sunday. That would total 18.7 billion yuan ($2.7 billion), and with a 78% stake in the company, Hui will get the lion’s share.Evergrande shares rose 3.3% in morning trading in Hong Kong, paring this year’s decline to 13%.The 61-year-old company founder didn’t take a salary last year, and was paid the equivalent of about $34,000 in fees. However, he’s worth $27.5 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.Read more: Musk’s Latest Challenger Is a Politically Savvy Chinese TycoonEvergrande has poured billions of dollars into acquisitions as Hui pursues an ambition to make the company the world’s biggest maker of electric cars in the next three to five years.The cash burning foray into electric-cars comes as Evergrande’s net debt-to-equity ratio hovers around 153%, one of the highest among Chinese developers.What Bloomberg Opinion says:Evergrande’s dividend “is set to further aggravate its cash crunch. The confluence of weak first-half sales, falling cash collections, and cash burn from its electric-vehicle foray means Evergrande will struggle to shake off enough net debt to hit its target -- 70% of equity -- by mid-2020.”\--Kristy Hung, banking & real estate analystTo read the full report, click hereSo far, Hui doesn’t have much to show for all his grand plans, last month vowing to unveil a debut car by June 2020 -- a year later than first promised.Not only does that pit him against Elon Musk’s Tesla Inc., which has been churning out EVs for years, but also all the world’s major automakers, which are plowing tens of billions of dollars into EV production and research. Evergrande will also be entering a crowded local field at a time sales are slumping as the government reduces subsidies.The proposed dividend translates to a 50% payout ratio of the developer’s 37.4 billion yuan profit last year, the same since its listing. Shareholders will vote whether to approve the dividend at an extraordinary general meeting Jan. 15.Evergrande had deferred a decision on the 2018 dividend twice since March, partly to comply with Chinese regulatory rules as it pursues a back-door listing on the mainland for its real estate assets.The dividend is expected to be paid on or before Feb. 26, 2020, if it is approved by shareholders.While Evergrande has delayed dividend payments for the past three fiscal years, it indicated the fiscal 2019 payout will be made after it releases its annual report in March 2020.(Updates with share price in fourth paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Emma Dong in Shanghai at edong10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Katrina Nicholas at knicholas2@bloomberg.net, Peter VercoeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S. Says Accused Apple Secrets Thief Had Patriot Missile File
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Says Accused Apple Secrets Thief Had Patriot Missile File

    (Bloomberg) -- When U.S. prosecutors charged an Apple Inc. engineer in January with stealing trade secrets for a Chinese startup, a search of his home turned up something else, they said: a classified file from the Patriot missile program that belonged to his ex-employer, Raytheon Co.The discovery has added a striking national security wrinkle to an otherwise routine corporate espionage case, and the government says it merits keeping Jizhong Chen under close scrutiny.The Patriot document was discovered among numerous electronic devices and paper files from Chen’s former employers including General Electric -- some of which were stamped “confidential,” according to prosecutors.Chen, a U.S. citizen who was arrested on his way to catch a flight to China, is awaiting trial on charges that he collected photos, schematics and manuals from his work on Apple’s tightly guarded self-driving car project as he prepared to take a job with an unidentified rival.He has pleaded not guilty and remains free on $500,000 bail. But prosecutors argue the stash of sensitive data found in Maryland justifies subjecting him to location monitoring with an electronic device so he doesn’t disappear before his trial.Lawyers representing Chen and a second former Apple engineer facing similar charges -- who is also fighting prosecutors over the need for location monitoring -- contend the government is exaggerating the risk they’ll try to flee.The 2011 document relating to one of Raytheon’s best-known weapons was so secret that it “was not (and is not) permitted to be maintained outside of Department of Defense secured locations,” prosecutors said in an Oct. 29 filing that hasn’t previously been reported on by the media. Chen “has, for over eight years, illegally possessed classified national security materials taken from a former employer.”How a classified document ended up at an engineer’s home raises provocative questions, but they’re unlikely be answered in open court at a hearing set for Monday. A prosecutor and an attorney for Chen both declined to comment ahead of the hearing. A Raytheon spokeswoman didn’t respond to a request for comment.Read More: Tesla to Apple: Help Us Nail Robocar-Secrets Thief at China FirmAfter prosecutors first raised concerns about the evidence they found in Maryland, a magistrate judge agreed in March to extend an electronic monitoring requirement to give the government time to investigate. She finally ordered an end to the monitoring in October -- and prosecutors are now asking a district judge to overrule her.Lawyers for Chen say prosecutors have had enough time to present further evidence of criminal conduct. They also note that the federal office that supervises defendants on probation has concluded monitoring is no longer necessary because Chen has complied with all the conditions of his release and found full-time employment.Daniel Olmos represents both Chen and Zhang Xiaolang, who also worked on Apple’s autonomous driving project before he was arrested in July 2018 and accused of trying to take the company’s trade secrets to China-based XMotors. The lawyer makes an argument that goes to the heart of the cases against both men: There’s no evidence that Apple’s intellectual property was shared with a third party. That’s significant because possession of the information alone isn’t necessarily a crime.Olmos also contends that each of the engineers has strong ties in the U.S. and the trips they were about to take to China when they were arrested were planned for the purpose of visiting relatives, not escaping prosecution.“The government’s argument that Mr. Zhang poses a flight risk because he is a Chinese citizen is insufficient to warrant GPS monitoring,” Olmos said in a filing. “Mr. Zhang has full-time employment, a new family, and no travel documents.”The cases are U.S. v. Chen, 19-cr-00056, and U.S. v. Zhang, 18-cr-00312, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California (San Jose).To contact the reporters on this story: Peter Blumberg in San Francisco at pblumberg1@bloomberg.net;Robert Burnson in San Francisco at rburnson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Anthony Lin, Peter BlumbergFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Elon Musk Beats Back Defamation Lawsuit Over Insulting Tweet

    (Bloomberg) -- Elon Musk beat back a defamation claim from a British cave expert who sued the billionaire CEO over a tweet in which Musk labeled Vernon Unsworth a “pedo guy.”A federal jury in Los Angeles Friday took about an hour to return a verdict that said Musk’s insult fell short of defamation.“We were pretty much unanimous from the word ‘go,”’ said Carl Shusterman, a 70-year-old immigration lawyer who served on a jury for the first time.Shusterman said the verdict was straight-forward because it wasn’t clear if the tweet was actually about Unsworth, since Musk didn’t name him. The judge told the jurors that was one of the elements required to establish defamation, Shusterman said.“My faith in humanity has been restored,” Musk said after the verdict.It’s another win for Musk, 48, who’s managed to get out of legal trouble relatively unscathed. Musk agreed to step down from his role of chairman of Tesla Inc. for three years in 2018 to settle a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission lawsuit over a tweet the regulator said misled investors. But he’s run Tesla and SpaceX as usual.“It’s the last formal distraction from when Elon Musk went off the Twitter rails in 2018,” said Gene Munster of Loup Ventures. “Putting that to rest -- regardless of what the jury decided --is a step forward for Musk.”Unsworth had sought $190 million in damages for the harm he claimed to have suffered from the tweet, and to punish Musk. Musk said he fired off the tweet in anger after Unsworth insulted him and his team in a television interview.“I respect the jury’s decision,” Unsworth said after the verdict. “I’ll take it on the chin and move on.”His lawyers were less gracious, repeatedly referring to Musk as a “billionaire bully.”L. Lin Wood, one of Unsworth’s lawyers, said he wasn’t happy with the outcome. “He deserved a different kind of justice,” Wood said. Wood said he hasn’t decided whether to appeal the verdict.The four-day civil trial featured Wood and Alex Spiro -- two heavyweights squaring off in the courtroom. Wood had represented Richard Jewell, the security guard falsely accused of being connected to the Centennial Olympic Park bombing during the 1996 Summer Olympics.Spiro, a former prosecutor based in New York, lists rapper Jay-Z, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and several NBA players, including ex-Knick Charles Oakley as former clients.Spiro issued a five-word statement after the verdict.“The jury got it right,” he said.It was the first time that Musk has been called as a witness at a trial, despite numerous legal spats, including one with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission over a tweet the regulator said misled investors.Musk told the jury the tweet aimed at Unsworth shouldn’t have been taken literally and was sent because the caver insulted his effort to help rescue members of a Thai soccer team from a flooded cave in 2018.The rescue effort had riveted the attention of the world’s media. Musk and engineers at his companies prepared a mini submarine, built with rocket parts, to help. The kids, aged 11 to 16, were saved without the use of the sub.The high-profile effort from the celebrity CEO drew derision from Unsworth, who knew the caves well and helped in the rescue effort. He told CNN that Musk could “stick his submarine where it hurts” and that it had no chance of working.Musk responded on Twitter, calling Unsworth a “pedo guy” and adding: “Never saw this British expat guy who lives in Thailand (sus) at any point when we were in the caves.” Sus -- meaning suspect, or suspicious.Later, he asked why Unsworth hadn’t sued him. Musk also hired a private investigator to dig into Unsworth’s personal life and leak information to British tabloids.Unsworth, a financial consultant who divides his time between England and Thailand, described to the jury the effect the tweet had on him.“When you combine ‘sus’ and ‘pedo guy,’ I took it as I was being branded a pedophile,” Unsworth said on Wednesday. “I feel vulnerable and sometimes, when I’m in the U.K., I feel isolated.”490 StoriesIt was a tweet heard around the world. An expert witness for Unsworth told the jury that 490 English-language stories were published mentioning the “pedo guy” tweet -- not including stories about the litigation.Musk, who had apologized to Unsworth on Twitter, did so again in court. But Unsworth told the jury he had nothing to apologize for to Musk.Musk told the jury he found Unsworth’s comments in the CNN interview wrong and insulting -- especially to his team which he said worked hard to help in the rescue effort -- and so he fired back.“I thought he was just some random, creepy guy that the media interviewed,” Musk said of Unsworth.Neither man impressed Shusterman, the juror. He said there was no need for Unsworth to put down Musk’s mini submarine, and Musk’s response was equally immature.“I felt it was like two junior high school students fighting,” Shusterman said.(Updates with juror’s comment in third paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Edvard Pettersson in Los Angeles at epettersson@bloomberg.net;Kelly Gilblom in London at kgilblom@bloomberg.net;Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Joe Schneider, Steve StrothFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Teflon Musk Wins Again With Escape From Defamation Firestorm

    (Bloomberg) -- Even before the verdict came in Friday, Elon Musk had earned the sobriquet Teflon Man on Twitter.Once a jury decided that he hadn’t defamed a British man by calling him a “pedo guy” in a post on the social media platform -- Musk’s favorite -- his reputation as a controversy-stirring billionaire who escapes relatively unscathed from the firestorms he creates for himself seemed to be sealed.Dan Ives, a Wedbush Securities analyst who covers Tesla Inc., one of Musk’s companies, repeated it: “Right now he’s the Teflon man.” But, Ives added, “it’s a cautionary tale and hopefully situations like this don’t repeat.”There have been more than a few of those already for Musk, who is chief executive officer of Tesla and chairman and CEO of SpaceX. His boards have tolerated them, his fans love him all the more for his antics and investors don’t seem to mind. Tesla shares have rallied more than 60% in the past six months.The defamation lawsuit “was the last formal distraction from when Elon Musk went off the Twitter rails in 2018,” said Gene Munster of Loup Ventures.Even with the positive outcome for Musk, it remains a highly unusual case for a CEO.In July 2018, as the world was riveted by efforts to save a Thai youth soccer team stuck in a flooded cave, Musk’s engineers tried to help by making a mini submarine out of rocket parts. Vernon Unsworth, an expert caver instrumental in the rescue, told CNN that the mini-sub was little more than a publicity stunt. Musk fired off the “pedo guy” tweet -- and hired a private investigator to dig into Unsworth’s personal life and leak information to British tabloids.From there, Musk seemed to lurch from crisis to crisis -- and emerged each time with relatively mild consequences. Another Twitter post in August 2018 got him into hot water with the Securities and Exchange Commission; the agency sued him for securities fraud because he said he was taking Tesla private at $420 a share and had “funding secured,” which he in fact did not. (Tesla is still a public company, by the way.)His settlement with the SEC cost him $20 million and stripped him of his board chairmanship for three years, but he kept running the company as before anyway.Then there was the famous pot-smoking episode on Joe Rogan’s popular podcast in September 2018. Photos of Musk puffing on a cigar-sized joint went viral in a case of unfortunate optics for SpaceX, which has a contract with NASA to fly astronauts to the International Space Station. Musk later acknowledged in an email to SpaceX employee that the stunt was “not wise.”Musk was back in the SEC’s sights this February with a Twitter post about Tesla production figures that the agency contended violated the settlement agreement. A judge declined the SEC’s request to hold Musk in contempt and told both sides to “put on your reasonableness pants” and work something out. They did, amending the original deal to include specific topics that Musk can’t tweet about without prior approval from a Tesla lawyer.On the highly active Twitterverse of Tesla watchers, Friday’s outcome brought a mix of condemnation and applause -- as well as marveling that Teflon Musk had struck again.Lin Wood, Unsworth’s attorney, had his own take: “Goliath wins almost every time.”To contact the reporter on this story: Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Anne Reifenberg, Kara WetzelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Elon Musk found not liable in case brought against him by British diver
    TechCrunch

    Elon Musk found not liable in case brought against him by British diver

    After a three-day trial, Elon Musk was found not liable for defamation in a federal court today in Los Angeles, where Musk reportedly owns a cluster of six homes as well as oversees the operations of both SpaceX and Tesla. British diver Vernon Unsworth had brought the suit against Musk in the fall of 2018 after Musk tweeted that Unsworth was a "pedo guy," meaning a pedophile. Why: after Musk and his employees developed what they called a mini-submarine or escape pod to save a children's soccer team from a flooded cave in Thailand in July of 2018, Unsworth -- a stranger to Musk and an experienced diver with specific knowledge of the cave -- called the production a "PR stunt" when asked about the effort in an interview with CNN.

  • Tesla Inc boss Elon Musk wins defamation trial over 'pedo guy' tweet
    Reuters

    Tesla Inc boss Elon Musk wins defamation trial over 'pedo guy' tweet

    A U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles on Friday found in favour of Tesla Inc boss Elon Musk in the defamation lawsuit brought against him by a British cave explorer who Musk had branded a "pedo guy" on Twitter. The plaintiff, Vernon Unsworth, was seeking $190 million (£148 million) damages against Musk, who during the trial estimated his net worth at $20 billion.

  • Bloomberg

    British Cave Expert Seeks $190 Million in Damages From Musk

    (Bloomberg) -- Elon Musk should pay $190 million in damages to a British cave expert who claims he was defamed by the chief executive of Tesla Inc. in a tweet, the caver’s lawyer told a jury at the end of a trial in Los Angeles.A jury of five women and three men will decide the issue. Before the panel began deliberating, shortly after 1 p.m. in Los Angeles, standing next to the defense table where Musk was seated, L. Lin Wood told them: “Elon Musk is a liar.”Wood asked the jury to award $5 million in actual damages, $35 million in assumed damages and $150 million in punitive damages.Musk called Vernon Unsworth a “pedo guy” in a tweet, responding to an interview the caver gave on television in which he criticized Musk’s effort to use a miniature submarine to rescue members of a soccer team trapped in a Thai cave in 2018.Musk had argued “pedo guy” actually meant “creepy old man,” but Wood said Musk knows that’s not true.“He dropped a bomb on this man,” Wood told the jury, as a tight-lipped Musk glared at the lawyer.Musk’s lawyer Alex Spiro said in his closing argument that Unsworth hadn’t provided any evidence showing he was harmed by the tweets. Although he claimed on the stand to have suffered emotional damage from being a called a pedophile, Spiro said nobody believed he was accused of the crime.Spiro also argued that there had been no independent confirmation that Unsworth suffered emotionally. Unsworth’s Thai companion, Tik, was the only one who noticed when he had a “bad day,” the caver told the jury. But Tik never testified.“Tik’s been with him through this whole thing,” Spiro said. “Where’s Tik?”(Updates with Musk’s lawyer)To contact the reporters on this story: Edvard Pettersson in Los Angeles at epettersson@bloomberg.net;Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Glovin at dglovin@bloomberg.net, Joe Schneider, Steve StrothFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    US STOCKS-Wall Street climbs on solid jobs data, trade hopes

    Wall Street ended solidly higher on Friday as a strong jobs report and optimism about U.S.-China trade negotiations ahead of an upcoming deadline helped stoke investor risk appetite. The Dow and the Nasdaq ended the session down from last Friday's close. "This type of report shows underlying economic strength, and it gives corporate management confidence in the strength of the economy," said Tim Ghriskey, chief investment strategist at Inverness Counsel in New York.

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