TSLA Jul 2020 150.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
5.75
+0.13 (+2.31%)
At close: 3:03PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close5.62
Open6.50
Bid4.20
Ask6.20
Strike150.00
Expiry date2020-07-17
Day's range5.72 - 6.50
Contract rangeN/A
Volume4
Open interest246
  • Coronavirus: Car industry pivot to ventilators isn't the miracle solution to global shortfall
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Car industry pivot to ventilators isn't the miracle solution to global shortfall

    With a wealth of 3-D printing capabilities and production power, governments have been reaching out to the car industry for support.

  • Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory to Cut On-Site Staff by 75%
    Bloomberg

    Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory to Cut On-Site Staff by 75%

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc.’s Nevada gigafactory is reducing on-site staff by 75% in the coming days to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, according to the county where the plant is located.Storey County said local companies regularly tell it about the measures they are taking to adhere to guidelines aimed at combating the outbreak. The gigafactory produces battery packs and electric motors with partner Panasonic Corp.Panasonic said its half of the factory has been idle since a few days after Nevada ordered the closing of non-essential businesses on or about March 17. Tesla representatives in China didn’t immediately respond to calls seeking comment.Two Tesla employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to an internal email this week, which didn’t specify which office they worked in. Last week, Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk capitulated to pressure from police and county health officials to suspend production at Tesla’s lone U.S. car-assembly plant in California.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla to slash on-site staff at Nevada factory by 75% due to virus - county manager
    Reuters

    Tesla to slash on-site staff at Nevada factory by 75% due to virus - county manager

    BEIJING/TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. electric carmaker Tesla Inc plans to slash on-site staff at its Nevada battery plant by around 75% due to the coronavirus pandemic, the local county manager said on Thursday. The move comes after its Japanese battery partner Panasonic Corp said it would scale down operations at the Nevada factory this week before closing it for 14 days. The factory produces electric motors and battery packs for Tesla's popular Model 3 sedans.

  • Tesla to slash on-site staff at Nevada factory by 75% due to virus: county manager
    Reuters

    Tesla to slash on-site staff at Nevada factory by 75% due to virus: county manager

    BEIJING/TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. electric carmaker Tesla Inc plans to slash on-site staff at its Nevada battery plant by around 75% due to the coronavirus pandemic, the local county manager said on Thursday. The move comes after its Japanese battery partner Panasonic Corp said it would scale down operations at the Nevada factory this week before closing it for 14 days. The factory produces electric motors and battery packs for Tesla's popular Model 3 sedans.

  • Tesla email reveals two employees have tested positive for COVID-19
    TechCrunch

    Tesla email reveals two employees have tested positive for COVID-19

    Two Tesla employees, who had been working at home for nearly two weeks, have tested positive for COVID-19, according to an internal email sent Thursday morning by the company's head of environmental, health, and safety department and viewed by TechCrunch . The employees were not symptomatic in the office, and both are quarantined at home and recovering well, according to the email from Tesla's EHS department head Laurie Shelby. Tesla could not be reached for comment.

  • Tesla Says Two Employees Tested Positive for Coronavirus
    Bloomberg

    Tesla Says Two Employees Tested Positive for Coronavirus

    (Bloomberg) -- Two Tesla Inc. employees have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to an internal email.The two staffers had been working from home for almost two weeks and were not symptomatic when they were in the office, according to the memo. Both are quarantined at home and recovering well, the company told employees.The email was sent out by Tesla’s environment, health and safety department and signed by Laurie. The head of the division is Laurie Shelby, a vice president. Tesla didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment on the memo, which doesn’t specify which office the employees worked in.Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk last week capitulated to pressure from police and county health officials to suspend production at Tesla’s lone U.S. assembly plant in California. The state has confirmed more than 3,100 coronavirus cases, trailing only New York and New Jersey.Tesla kept the factory open for several days despite shelter-in-place orders first made by San Francisco-area counties and then the governor. While the company said internally that its factory was an essential business, local officials publicly said otherwise.Musk, 48, has dramatically shifted his tone on a viral illness that became a global pandemic. After weeks of downplaying virality and death rates, calling panic over the virus “dumb” and repeatedly tweeting his view that overreaction would do more harm than the disease itself, he’s now pledged to make ventilators and posted about donating masks to hospital workers.(Updates with background in fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Two Tesla employees test positive for coronavirus: company email
    Reuters

    Two Tesla employees test positive for coronavirus: company email

    Tesla's email, seen by Reuters, did not disclose in which unit or at what location the employees work but said the employees were quarantined and recovering well. Tesla said the employees' direct coworkers, who had also been working from home for nearly two weeks, had been immediately notified to quarantine at home and watch for symptoms. "I feel this is important to share with everyone at Tesla not to cause stress or panic but so you hear this information directly from Tesla," Laurie Shelby, head of Tesla's environmental and safety department, said in the email.

  • Detroit's near future based on SUVs, not EVs, production plans show
    Reuters

    Detroit's near future based on SUVs, not EVs, production plans show

    General Motors Co and Ford Motor Co have widely touted their commitment to emission-free electric cars, but their production plans show a growing reliance on ever-larger gas-powered vehicles. The two biggest U.S. automakers will make more than 5 million SUVs and pickup trucks in 2026, but only about 320,000 electric vehicles, according to detailed production plans for North America seen by Reuters.

  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk: New York gigafactory will reopen for ventilator production
    TechCrunch

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk: New York gigafactory will reopen for ventilator production

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk said Wednesday that the company's factory in Buffalo, New York will open "as soon as humanly possible" to produce ventilators that are in short supply due to the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 attacks the lungs and can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. There are about 160,000 ventilators in the United States and another 12,700 in the National Strategic Supply, the NYT reported.

  • Coronavirus: Elon Musk donates over 1,200 ventilators to California hospitals
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Elon Musk donates over 1,200 ventilators to California hospitals

    Elon Musk has donated more than 1,000 ventilators to hospitals in Los Angeles after previously calling the coronavirus panic 'dumb'.

  • Auto Bigwigs Shift Gears to Ventilators Amid Coronavirus Woes
    Zacks

    Auto Bigwigs Shift Gears to Ventilators Amid Coronavirus Woes

    As ventilator makers scramble to meet demand, auto biggies like General Motors, Tesla and others are lending a hand in the fight against COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Virus Skeptic Musk Donates Ventilators in What Governor Calls ‘Heroic Effort’
    Bloomberg

    Virus Skeptic Musk Donates Ventilators in What Governor Calls ‘Heroic Effort’

    (Bloomberg) -- Elon Musk, the chief executive officer of Tesla Inc. and an outspoken skeptic of the severity of the coronavirus outbreak, donated more than 1,000 ventilators to officials in Los Angeles to meet demand as the pandemic becomes more severe.The billionaire said in a tweet he helped acquire 1,255 of the machines from China last week and arranged them to be air-shipped to Los Angeles. He thanked Tesla staff and customs officials in China and Los Angeles for assistance.“Elon Musk: how about this? I told you a few days ago he was likely to have 1,000 ventilators this week,” California Governor Gavin Newsom told reporters in a briefing Monday. “They arrived in Los Angeles and Elon Musk is already working with the hospital association and others to get those ventilators out in real time. It’s an heroic effort.”Musk’s move comes after he tweeted dismissively about whether there will even be a ventilator shortage. The entrepreneur had also called the panic surrounding the outbreak “dumb” and said that kids are “essentially immune” despite evidence that it can be serious for some children. Musk spent days dueling with local officials over a county shelter-in-place order before Tesla finally idled production at its lone U.S. car-assembly plant.Musk’s fortune has been whipsawed by the spread of the Coronavirus. His net worth surged to about $45 billion in February, but has dropped to $27 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index, a ranking of the world’s 500 wealthiest people. Tesla now joins General Motors Co. in providing ventilators after one Tesla customer urged him to re-purpose Tesla’s factory to produce the machines.Newsom said six California companies have offered their facilities to manufacture gowns and he’s in conversation with another 25 providers that want to start 3D printing masks for health-care workers.Updated models predict the state is 50,000 hospital beds short to meet needs as the pandemic spreads, the governor said. For the health-care workers who will staff those additional beds, Newsom said the state is looking to procure 1 billion gloves and more than 500 million masks.“That’s not a typo,” Newsom said.Related: Musk Talks Ventilators With Medtronic as It Doubles Production(Updates with Musk’s net worth decline in fifth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla CEO says bought ventilators in China for U.S
    Reuters

    Tesla CEO says bought ventilators in China for U.S

    Tesla bought hospital ventilators in China and shipped them to the United States, CEO Elon Musk said on Tuesday. Tesla's purchase comes as governments across the globe appeal to automakers and aerospace companies help procure or make ventilators and other medical equipment. "China had an oversupply, so we bought 1255 FDA-approved ResMed, Philips & Medtronic ventilators on Friday night & airshipped them to LA," Musk said on Twitter.

  • The Doctor Isn't Quite Ready to Skype You Now
    Bloomberg

    The Doctor Isn't Quite Ready to Skype You Now

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Telemedicine, long hyped as a more efficient approach to health care, is finally taking off.People who suspect they’re suffering from Covid-19 symptoms are being told to self-isolate. But they also need to seek medical advice. Many are turning towards telemedicine providers, who eliminate the need to leave home by connecting the potentially ill with medical professionals in a telephone or video call. For healthcare providers, a remote consultation is considerably more cost effective (and safer) than an in-person visit.Telemedicine has for years promised a great deal, but previously delivered very little. All of a sudden it looks like it has genuine potential. French firm Doctolib SAS said last week that it had seen an 18-fold jump in the number of video consultations in the past month. U.S. health insurers have meanwhile agreed to cover coronavirus-related telemedicine, while the federal government has made it easier for Medicare recipients to use.Investors are keen on buying into an industry that the market leader, Teladoc Health Inc., estimates could be worth $10 billion in annual U.S. revenue. Shares in Teladoc, the sector’s only publicly traded firm of note, have doubled in value since the start of the year – the S&P 500 is down about 30% in the same period.With a $12 billion market valuation, Teladoc trades on 16 times predicted 2020 sales, according to Bloomberg data. That would make it the most highly valued stock in a basket of hot software companies compiled by Jefferies analysts David Windley and Ben Flox. Even tech darling ServiceNow Inc., a cloud computing firm, trades at 10 times expected sales. Small wonder analysts have been revising down their recommendations on Teladoc stock.Superficially, the conditions are ripe for matching investment capital with an industry that needs to grow. When Tesla Inc.’s stock enjoyed a similar jump in January and February, the electric vehicle manufacturer did an opportunistic share sale. But things aren’t quite so simple for the telemedicine industry.Volatile markets make it hard to see how Teladoc, whose shares have seen 20% swings, could sell equity or one of its rivals could raise money by going public. Venture capital firms are also targeting resources on the defense of existing investments rather than seeking out new ones. To meet the surging demand effectively, they likely need that money.Questions over where telemedicine’s profitability will settle may also make investors pause. As with any new sector, first-mover advantages may be eroded over time by competition. New entrants have been emerging fast, with venture capital piling into the burgeoning health-tech sector. In 2018, $895 million was invested in telehealth startups, according to PitchBook data.While Teladoc’s share-price surge is comparable to Tesla’s, its business model is more akin to Uber’s: it’s essentially a two-way marketplace. The value resides partly in the software that poses questions to patients to ensure they’re directed to the most suitable physician. The main barrier to entry is signing up enough doctors to attract patients, and (although less so today) enough patients to use the service.In tech, the usual method of addressing such problems is to throw money at them — in this case, by providing generous financial incentives to both sides of the market to sign up. As Uber, whose software connects riders to the nearest driver, has found, fights to outspend rivals may be best avoided. The ride-hailing company sold regional businesses to well-capitalized competitors in India, China and southeast Asia — cashing out of markets where it lacks scale instead of getting into price wars in the hope of eventually emerging as the dominant player.The need for capital is underscored by the operational challenges raised by Covid-19. Providers are still struggling to enlist sufficient doctors to meet demand, and are facing tech issues too, CNBC reported last week. Doctolib has an advantage, since it already has a database of doctors from its original business arranging medical appointments more efficiently.The industry has an opportunity to lessen the strain on the global health system. But whether it can overcome financial and operational constraints to make a significant difference to the current crisis remains to be seen.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • World's Richest Have Lost Over $1 Trillion In Stock Market Crash
    Oilprice.com

    World's Richest Have Lost Over $1 Trillion In Stock Market Crash

    The old adage “the rich keep getting richer” no longer holds true.

  • Corporate America to the rescue?
    Yahoo Finance

    Corporate America to the rescue?

    Firms like Facebook, Amazon and General Motors hope pitching in to defeat the coronavirus will make people forget past grievances with them.

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