TSLA Jul 2020 510.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
3.1500
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 3:45PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close3.1500
Open3.5700
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0000
Strike510.00
Expiry date2020-07-17
Day's range3.1500 - 3.6000
Contract rangeN/A
Volume8
Open interest193
  • Geely's Polestar plans China showroom expansion to compete with Tesla: sources
    Reuters

    Geely's Polestar plans China showroom expansion to compete with Tesla: sources

    Polestar, the premium electric vehicle maker owned by China's Geely, plans a big expansion of its showroom network in the mainland, sources said, as it prepares for delivery of cars to compete with Tesla Inc's <TSLA.O> locally made Model 3. Showroom strength is becoming an important differentiator for electric vehicle (EV) makers in the world's biggest auto and EV market, as they line up new model launches. Polestar, which plans to deliver Polestar 2 electric sedans in China from July, currently has one showroom, in the capital Beijing.

  • Why Tesla Stock Jumped on Monday
    Motley Fool

    Why Tesla Stock Jumped on Monday

    Despite no notable Tesla-specific news over the weekend, shares of the electric-car maker are rising on Monday. Here's what investors should know.

  • How SpaceX is 'revolutionizing the space industry'
    Yahoo Finance

    How SpaceX is 'revolutionizing the space industry'

    SpaceX and NASA’s historic human spaceflight proves what space investors are betting on — commercial companies that can lower the cost to access space.

  • Stock Market News: SpaceX Success Launches Tesla, Virgin Galactic Stocks
    Motley Fool

    Stock Market News: SpaceX Success Launches Tesla, Virgin Galactic Stocks

    A partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and privately held launch company SpaceX was responsible for sending two astronauts to the International Space Station. The news lifted shares of two other companies, Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) and Virgin Galactic Holdings (NYSE: SPCE), for related but somewhat different reasons. Tesla shares rose almost 6% Monday morning, reaching their best level since their February all-time highs.

  • Will protests and looting permanently damage the economy?
    Yahoo Finance

    Will protests and looting permanently damage the economy?

    Here's how investors should be thinking through the impact of social unrest sweeping the country.

  • Here's Why Amyris Is Soaring Today
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Amyris Is Soaring Today

    Shares of Amyris (NASDAQ: AMRS) soared as much as 20.9% today after an article on Seeking Alpha suggested the synthetic biology company could be the next Tesla. On the one hand, what investor wouldn't want to own the next Tesla? Shares of the electric vehicle manufacturer and energy pioneer have jumped 3,570% since the initial public offering (IPO).

  • Auto Stock Roundup: NSANY Incurs Biggest Loss in 20 Years, AZO Beats on Q3 Earnings
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: NSANY Incurs Biggest Loss in 20 Years, AZO Beats on Q3 Earnings

    Nissan (NSANY) incurs fiscal 2019 loss of 671.2 billion yen, which marks the worst in two decades. Meanwhile, AutoZone (AZO) tops fiscal Q3 earnings estimates despite coronavirus woes.

  • The Station: Amazon eyes Zoox, Aurora goes back to school and Cabana hits the road
    TechCrunch

    The Station: Amazon eyes Zoox, Aurora goes back to school and Cabana hits the road

    Take a look at the most recent survey we conducted with a bunch of venture capitalists about mobility and what areas interest them most. A photo below, courtesy of Cris Moffitt, shows a sliver of the thousands of bikes at the yard in North Carolina. Keaks (Kirsten Korosec) has been working on a big(ish) story about JUMP for the last week.

  • Tesla Breaks Out
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    Tesla Breaks Out

    Tesla blasted higher, clearing an 869.92 cup-with-handle buy point. The successful SpaceX launch was a trigger for Tesla, but the stock has been trading tightly for a few weeks.

  • Where Will Tesla Be in 5 Years?
    Motley Fool

    Where Will Tesla Be in 5 Years?

    Since even before its IPO, top electric-car maker Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) has faced tough questions about its future. After that, they were skeptical about the economics of manufacturing a mass-market electric car. Throughout it all, Tesla's reputation, its footprint, and -- for the most part, anyway -- its share price grew and grew and grew (as did its debt load; more on that later).

  • Musk's SpaceX set to retry historic rocket launch
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Musk's SpaceX set to retry historic rocket launch

    The mission is a milestone in Musk’s drive to make space travel less expensive, marking the first time a commercially developed spaceship will have carried Americans into orbit.

  • Why Is Tesla (TSLA) Up 3.1% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Tesla (TSLA) Up 3.1% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Tesla (TSLA) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Elon Musk Collects Payout Valued at $775 Million from Tesla
    Motley Fool

    Elon Musk Collects Payout Valued at $775 Million from Tesla

    The Tesla CEO meets milestones to earn his first tranche of performance pay, but not all shareholders approve.

  • Zoom Stock Is the Tesla of Video Communications
    Motley Fool

    Zoom Stock Is the Tesla of Video Communications

    If you think Zoom Video Communications is overvalued, has no moat, and has security issues, just remember that these are all issues Tesla had to overcome as well to deliver amazing shareholder returns.

  • What’s Keeping Stocks Afloat? The ‘Microsoft Market’
    Bloomberg

    What’s Keeping Stocks Afloat? The ‘Microsoft Market’

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Stocks were supposed to be mired in a bear market after they plunged in March as the coronavirus pandemic shuttered business and sent U.S. unemployment to its highest rate since the Great Depression.Even a 62% recovery by the S&P 500 Index by the middle of May failed to comfort experts like billionaire money managers Stan Druckenmiller and David Tepper , who characterized stocks as the worst investments of their careers. They weren't alone; amid an estimated 47% collapse in gross domestic product, fewer than a quarter of respondents to an Evercore ISI survey said they expected the next 10% move in the market to be higher.So far, though, stocks have held their own as economic indicators sagged, regaining 37% of their value from the low point in mid-March. “The stock market looks increasingly divorced from economic reality,” a New York Times article on the phenomenon proclaimed.Or maybe not — not if you think of it as the Microsoft market. No company has defied the pessimism more than Microsoft Corp., and for a lot of sensible reasons. The Seattle-based maker of global business and consumer software led all publicly traded companies most of the year with a $1.4 trillion market valuation, exceeded only by Saudi Arabian Oil Co. which isn't yet freely traded.Unlike the largest fossil fuel company, which lost 13% since its December $1.9 trillion initial public offering, Microsoft is within 5% of its Feb. 11 record high and appreciated $947 billion since 2015, more than any of the 10 largest companies, including Apple Inc., Alphabet Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. The gap between Microsoft and Aramco narrowed to $229 billion from $840 billion, a trend likely to continue amid weak global growth in the months ahead.That's because Microsoft, unlike Aramco, is a mainstay of the global economy, developing and supplying 75% of the operating systems used by computers and servers worldwide, according to the market-analysis company IDC.Microsoft's vast infrastructure and productivity applications enable companies, governments and individuals to navigate increasing social and workforce disruption caused by the pandemic and other disasters stoked by global warming and climate change.As one of the anchors of the Nasdaq 100 Index (more than 80% are technology firms) Microsoft signifies the growing dependence of the economy on these companies, which this year outperformed the Dow Jones Industrial Average by the most since 2000 (Nasdaq 100 gained 8% as the DJIA lost 10%), according to data compiled by Bloomberg.“Microsoft could emerge stronger than most of its rivals once the Covid-19 crisis subsides, in our view, as enterprises spend more to upgrade their infrastructure and applications, translating into above-consensus, double-digit sales growth from fiscal 2022-2021,” said Anurag Rana, a senior analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence in a May 15 report. “Its deep portfolio of cloud products, client relationships and security spending are differentiators.”Such confidence is prompted by the past five quarters, when Microsoft earnings for the first time exceeded forecasts by at least 10% after beating the average of analyst estimates in all but one of the 23 quarters since 2015, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Unlike its five more glamorous peers — Facebook Inc., Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google (Alphabet) — Microsoft has an uninterrupted growth rate with the least volatility, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.To be sure, the Faang companies and similar technology marvels retained much of their value during the Coronavirus pandemic. Netflix has gained 28% since the end of 2019; Amazon is up 30%, Apple 9%, Facebook 10%. Tesla Inc., the maker of electric, battery-powered vehicles, rallied 93% since the end of 2019 and is worth just $59 billion less than No. 1 Toyota Motor Corp.Tesla anticipated the remotely engaged economy by selling its vehicles online and improving the customer experience with periodic, automatic software upgrades. The traditional auto companies haven't fared well. Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, is down 24% since the end of 2019 and General Motors Co., the largest U.S. auto maker, declined 28% and is worth only 26% of Tesla's current market capitalization of $149 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.That's why the Dow, once the benchmark of corporate America, is a shadow of its former self as industrial companies represent just 9% of the average, down from 16% in 2000, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.“Microsoft already had a great relationship with Fortune 2000 tech departments because of its dominance in Windows and Office software products,” said Bloomberg's Rana in a recent interview. “As these legacy companies look to invest more digitally transforming their business post Covid-19, Microsoft should get its fair share of work” — lifting the stock market as it helps transform the economy.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Matthew Winkler, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Bloomberg News, writes about markets.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla Slashes Vehicle Prices: Here's What Investors Should Know
    Motley Fool

    Tesla Slashes Vehicle Prices: Here's What Investors Should Know

    In a surprise move, electric-car maker Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) cut the prices of some of vehicles by as much as 6% this week. While investors can't know for sure exactly what spurred the decision for the price decrease, it almost certainly reflected an effort to increase demand for its vehicles. Further, it's possible that price cuts also reflected improved manufacturing costs.

  • Stock Market Wrap-Up: Why Tesla's Price Cuts and Beyond Meat's Stock Drop Shouldn't Worry You
    Motley Fool

    Stock Market Wrap-Up: Why Tesla's Price Cuts and Beyond Meat's Stock Drop Shouldn't Worry You

    As we've seen recently, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI) had larger gains than the broader market, but the S&P 500 (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC) and Nasdaq Composite (NASDAQINDEX: ^IXIC) also managed to pick up ground. Among individual stocks, Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) shares were surprisingly little changed, even after the electric automaker announced a move that made some fear that vehicle demand could be weaker than previously believed. Tesla shares were up a fraction of a percent Wednesday following news overnight that the automaker had chosen to cut prices of some its vehicles.

  • Why NIO Stock Is Rising Today
    Motley Fool

    Why NIO Stock Is Rising Today

    What happened Shares of Chinese electric-vehicle maker NIO (NYSE: NIO) were trading higher amid a broad-based rally on Wednesday afternoon, after a JPMorgan analyst upgraded the stock ahead of Thursday's earnings report.

  • Tesla’s Price Cuts Signal Demand Weaker Than Stock Suggests
    Bloomberg

    Tesla’s Price Cuts Signal Demand Weaker Than Stock Suggests

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc.’s overnight price cuts suggest the coronavirus is putting a bigger damper on demand than has been reflected in the electric-car maker’s share price.The $5,000 reductions for the Model S and X and $2,000 cut for the Model 3 were an “acknowledgment that Tesla isn’t immune to material North American demand weakness,” Craig Irwin, an analyst at Roth Capital Partners, said in a report Wednesday.“With the stock trading in the stratosphere,” Irwin wrote, “the key question is, ‘Can Tesla continue to deliver an interesting growth rate in the U.S.?’”Credit Suisse’s Dan Levy said the discounts change the narrative around the company’s volume this quarter. Prior to the price cuts, investors were concerned demand would be limited by tight inventory. The company shut down production at its lone U.S. auto plant on March 23 and rushed to reopen the facility -- initially without local authorities’ permission -- in mid May.Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk tweeted at the beginning of the month that Tesla’s shares were trading too high in his view. While the tweet dragged down the stock on May 1, it advanced another 18% through Tuesday’s close. While analysts have speculated the company’s sales will hold up better than the broader industry, forecaster IHS Markit is projecting at least a 22% contraction in global auto deliveries this year.“Price cuts are likely tactical and aimed at supporting demand in the U.S. in the context of today’s pandemic,” Pierre Ferragu, the New Street Research analyst whose $1,100 price target for Tesla’s stock is the highest on Wall Street, wrote in a report. He said the Model 3, X and S “all have reached their full potential in the U.S.”Tesla erased earlier declines to trade up 0.2% to $820.66 as of 3 p.m. in New York. The stock has almost doubled this year.Read more: Costly Electric Vehicles Confront a Harsh Coronavirus Reality(Updates with New Street Research report in sixth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The #1 Insider Signal Every Trader Should Know
    Zacks

    The #1 Insider Signal Every Trader Should Know

    If you're going to buy when the insiders do, then you want only their top picks. Learn an easy way to find them.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Will Take Robot Cars to a Whole New Level

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Amazon.com Inc.’s interest in acquiring a self-driving car pioneer is the prime example (pun intended) of how expectations for driverless vehicles have been recalibrated.The e-commerce giant is in advanced talks to buy Zoox Inc. for less than the $3.2 billion at which it was valued in 2018, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. Given the California-based startup’s approach to autonomous cars, its fate is particularly instructive.In a very crowded field, Zoox was practically alone in aiming to build a whole new kind of electric-powered vehicle, and to operate the fleet itself. Peers such as Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo, General Motors Co.’s Cruise unit, Ford Motor Co. and Volkswagen AG’s joint venture Argo AI, and Aurora Innovations Inc. have focused solely on developing the self-driving technology that could subsequently be fitted into vehicles.Zoox wanted to be Tesla Inc., Waymo and Uber Technologies Inc. all rolled into one.Back in 2015, that seemed like an attractive proposition. If the triple threat to the automotive industry was autonomous technology, electric drivetrains and ride-hailing, why not embrace all three? After all, there were expectations that by 2020 robotaxis would ferry you around the world’s metropolises. Capital flowed into self-driving car startups, typified by the $1 billion GM spent acquiring Cruise in 2016.Those dreams, needless to say, have failed to materialize. Companies that had aimed to jump straight to the fourth of five levels of autonomy have quietly downshifted. (The first level of self-driving encompasses driver-assistance functions such as cruise control, and the fifth is full automation.) Bloomberg New Energy Finance doesn’t expect vehicles with Level Four automation to start gaining traction until 2034. Even then, they will likely represent just 831,000 of the 95 million-unit global car market that year.What’s more, the expense of developing, building and operating a fleet of self-driving cars would be considerable. Even deep-pocketed Alphabet and GM have sought outside investment for their efforts. Established carmakers are meanwhile focusing their capital on electric cars, a more imminent threat. And owning and operating a fleet is expensive too. Zoox had a tough sell to investors: In 15 years’ time, it might have been an attractive business.Which brings us to Amazon. Even if robotaxis aren’t coming any time soon, there are alternative applications for autonomous technology that fall squarely in the Seattle-based firm’s wheelhouse, namely, logistics. Given Amazon’s shipping costs are set to hit $90 billion a year, tech from Zoox could help save $20 billion in shipping costs, according to Morgan Stanley analysts. Its solutions could be used across warehousing and distribution. Buying Zoox could take Amazon's other moves in this field — an existing investment in Aurora and experiments with self-driving truck specialist Embark and electric vanmaker Rivian — to a whole new level.Amazon has become the fantasy acquirer for any number of companies seeking a soft landing: theater chains, brick-and-mortar retailers, food deliverers, mobile carriers, real estate brokers, dental suppliers, film studios and plenty more besides.Sometimes, just sometimes, those deals make sense. Zoox is one of them.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla Cutting Car Prices to Spur Demand
    Motley Fool

    Tesla Cutting Car Prices to Spur Demand

    The electric vehicle company had strong first-quarter results, but COVID-19 related lockdowns have put a damper on North American car sales.

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