TSLA Jun 2021 15.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
0.2500
+0.0200 (+8.70%)
At close: 1:07PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close0.2300
Open0.2300
Bid0.0000
Ask0.8000
Strike15.00
Expiry date2021-06-18
Day's range0.2300 - 0.2300
Contract rangeN/A
Volume5
Open interest518
  • Tesla (TSLA) Stock Moves -1.62%: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Tesla (TSLA) Stock Moves -1.62%: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Tesla (TSLA) closed at $667.99, marking a -1.62% move from the previous day.

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    The #1 Insider Signal Every Trader Should Know

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  • Tesla (TSLA) Up 6% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
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    Tesla (TSLA) Up 6% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

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  • Auto Stock Roundup: TM Invests in Pony.ai, ADNT Trims View & More
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    Auto Stock Roundup: TM Invests in Pony.ai, ADNT Trims View & More

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  • Coronavirus Concerns Put Brakes on Tesla's Relentless Rally
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    Coronavirus Concerns Put Brakes on Tesla's Relentless Rally

    Tesla (TSLA) still holds extensive upside potential, provided it penetrates the China market when the coronavirus scare fades and the Berlin Gigafactory becomes operational by next summer as promised.

  • Panasonic Parting Ways Isn't Bad for Tesla
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    Panasonic Parting Ways Isn't Bad for Tesla

    Panasonic bowing out of the solar panel JV will have no major effect on Tesla.

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  • Tesla's Rally Finally Broke Down
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    Tesla's Rally Finally Broke Down

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  • Tesla shares slump as coronavirus hits China car registrations
    Reuters

    Tesla shares slump as coronavirus hits China car registrations

    Data from LMC Automotive showed that 3,563 Tesla vehicles were registered in China in January, up from 853 vehicles a year earlier, but down from the 6,613 vehicles registered in December. Tesla registrations fluctuate significantly from month to month, LMC data showed. In October 2019, Tesla owners registered just 763 vehicles, LMC data showed.

  • Tesla & Panasonic to Abort Solar-Cell Production in New York
    Zacks

    Tesla & Panasonic to Abort Solar-Cell Production in New York

    Tesla (TSLA) and Panasonic's decision to cease their solar cell partnership for Gigafactory 2 comes as another setback to the already strained relationship between the two firms.

  • Tesla Sinks on Weak China Registrations Before Brunt of Virus
    Bloomberg

    Tesla Sinks on Weak China Registrations Before Brunt of Virus

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. shares fell after China registration data indicated a significant sequential slowdown in demand before the electric-car maker started feeling the brunt of any impact from the coronavirus.Registrations of new Tesla cars plunged 46% to 3,563 in January from December, according to state-backed China Automotive Information Net, which gathers industry data based on insurance purchases. Of the January registrations, 2,605 were for cars built in China.While Tesla had bucked the trend in China’s waning electric-car market in the previous two months, the January drop shows that the U.S. brand isn’t immune to challenges the broader industry is facing. China’s car market probably is headed for a third straight annual decline as the coronavirus outbreak exacerbates a slump started by an economic slowdown and trade tensions.Tesla shares dropped as much as 6.8% shortly after the start of regular trading. The stock had soared 86% this year through the close Wednesday, partly driven by optimism about the company starting to produce Model 3 sedans at a newly built plant near Shanghai.In total, deliveries of new-energy vehicles in China from carmakers to dealerships tumbled 54% last month, according to the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers, an industry body.Tesla began delivering locally built Model 3s to customers in China last month, seeking to boost volumes amid rising competition from the likes of BMW AG and Daimler AG, which are also bringing out new electric cars. The sedans assembled domestically qualify for tax exemptions and subsidies the company has missed out on in the past.The locally manufactured models helped Tesla’s January registrations increase from just 853 a year earlier.The timing of China’s Lunar New Year complicates year-over-year comparisons in the first months of 2020. The holiday fell in January this year and in February in 2019.But business has ground to a halt this month due to the coronavirus, and automakers are expected to come up well short of last year’s sales levels in February. Deliveries to dealers this month are set to slide about 75%, resulting in about a 40% drop in the first two months of 2020, according to the China Passenger Car Association.(Updates with regular trading in deck headline and fourth paragraph)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Chunying Zhang in Shanghai at czhang714@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Craig Trudell, Tony RobinsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, Enbridge, DuPont de Nemours, Delta Air Lines and Palo Alto Networks
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    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Tesla, Enbridge, DuPont de Nemours, Delta Air Lines and Palo Alto Networks

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  • Bloomberg

    A Bailout Won’t Help China’s Tesla Wannabe, NIO

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Will a provincial government be able to save China’s Tesla wannabe? Investors seem to think so. The reality may be different.New York-listed NIO Inc., a self-described pioneer in China’s premium electric vehicle market and rival to Elon Musk’s company, said Tuesday that it has made a tentative agreement with the municipal government of Hefei in Anhui province for funding support. The company will move its China headquarters there from Shanghai and says it plans to raise more than 10 billion yuan ($1.43 billion) in light of the partnership. Other details were sparse. The stock surged as much as 34%.Those are lofty ambitions considering the company was sitting on $1.5 billion of debt and is expected to post negative free cash flow of $1.4 billion for 2019, according to Bloomberg estimates. Earlier this month, NIO said it had raised $100 million in one-year convertible notes, bringing the aggregate to $200 million of private placements this year. It said it was “working on several financing projects, the outcome of which is uncertain at this stage.” Meanwhile, as the coronavirus hobbles China Inc., NIO can’t afford to pay its workers on time.The company has done a few similar partnerships. Last year, it entered into a 10 billion yuan agreement to finance research and development and a new manufacturing facility with a state-owned fund in Beijing, E-Town Capital, in exchange for a minority stake. NIO counts the likes of Baillie Gifford  & Co. (a big Tesla investor), Tencent Holdings Ltd. and Temasek Holdings Pte among its backers. It has continuously burned cash since before going public in 2018. In the third quarter, it went through around 1.5 billion yuan to 2 billion yuan, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts estimate. They also forecast another cash outflow of 14 billion yuan before the company can break even in 2023. As NIO noted in its latest results announcement for the third quarter, its “cash balance is not adequate to provide the required working capital and liquidity for continuous operation in the next 12 months.”A helping hand from Beijing can’t turn around its operations at this rate of burn. Part of the fundamental problem is that the company doesn’t make its own cars. They’re manufactured by state-backed Anhui Jianghuai Automobile Group Corp., or JAC, at a plant in Hefei – where it’s moving – under a five-year agreement signed in 2016. The cost-effectiveness is questionable: For the first three years, NIO paid on a per-car basis and foot the bill for the plant’s operating losses. It isn’t clear what the arrangement is now.Under the new agreement, NIO plans to build a manufacturing facility. It previously scrapped plans for one in Shanghai, where Tesla has been welcomed by the local government. Even though car sales have inched up, NIO has continued to spend well beyond its means. The cost of selling vehicles and other products rose faster than revenues in the third quarter. But its cost of sales rose to 2.1 billion yuan, up 2.3% from the second quarter, and climbed 30% from a year earlier. Research and development expenses came down from the second quarter but were almost flat on-year at 1.02 billion yuan, accounting for almost 60% of revenues.In its latest earnings call, the company said it was taking cost-reduction measures. It cut around 2,000 jobs between January and September last year. What money NIO does bring in may be better spent on making the cars, rather than feeding hype around them. More than cash, NIO seems to need a new strategy if it wants to survive.To contact the author of this story: Anjani Trivedi at atrivedi39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Patrick McDowell at pmcdowell10@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coronavirus Fears: Should You Be Investing or Playing It Safe?
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    Coronavirus Fears: Should You Be Investing or Playing It Safe?

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  • Tesla, Panasonic Ending Solar-Roof Partnership at N.Y. Plant
    Bloomberg

    Tesla, Panasonic Ending Solar-Roof Partnership at N.Y. Plant

    (Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. and Panasonic Corp. plan to end their solar partnership at the electric-car maker’s state-subsidized factory in New York.Panasonic is ceasing its participation in the venture as part of a global overhaul of its solar business, according to a statement. The company will end its manufacturing operations at the factory in Buffalo, New York, by May, and exit the facility by the end of September.The Japanese conglomerate’s withdrawal comes as Tesla again tries to ramp production of its sleek Solar Roof product and nears a deadline to meet certain staffing requirements. The glass roof tiles have yet to capture a significant piece of the market in the years since Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk used the product to justify acquiring debt-ridden SolarCity Corp. in 2016.“Does it complicate the solar-roof story? Yes,” said Gordon Johnson, an analyst at GLJ Research and a Tesla bear. “Musk has been saying they’re going to ramp the solar-roof business in a big way. He promised 1,000 solar roofs a week by the end of last year, but that did not happen.”Tesla didn’t address an inquiry seeking comment. Panasonic spoke for its partner in its statement announcing that it would pull out: “According to Tesla, this does not impact Tesla’s future solar growth business plans,” the Osaka-based company said.As of earlier this month, the Buffalo plant needed to add about 360 more workers to bring its total to 1,460 by April, or pay a $41.2 million penalty.“Tesla informed us that they have not only met, but exceeded their next hiring commitment in Buffalo,” Howard Zemsky, chairman of the Empire State Development, a New York economic agency, said in a statement. “As of today, Tesla said they have more than 1,500 jobs in Buffalo and more than 300 others across New York State.” He added that the agency would work to verify those numbers.Tesla has begun rolling out the Solar Roof to customers in California, many of whom are affluent homeowners who already own its electric cars. The company is racing to hire roofers, installers and electricians in more than a dozen U.S. states.Panasonic and Tesla have had a tumultuous relationship since they unveiled an agreement in 2014 for the Japanese company to make the batteries that power the American company’s electric cars. Last year, Musk publicly blamed Panasonic for constraining production of Model 3 sedans. Just this month, Chinese battery maker Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. won a two-year contract to supply Tesla’s new factory near Shanghai.In the statement Wednesday, Panasonic said it will continue to produce car batteries with Tesla at a plant in Nevada. That operation was profitable for the first time in the quarter that ended in December.The Nikkei reported Panasonic’s plans to end the New York partnership earlier. The newspaper said Tesla has been using cells sourced from China for the Solar Roof.“Making a solar roof is more technically challenging than producing a normal solar panel,” Xiaoting Wang, an analyst at BloombergNEF, said in an email. Roofs are “supposed to play two roles and should meet more strict standards, such as higher mechanical strength.”(Updates with BloombergNEF analyst’s comment in the last paragraph)\--With assistance from Dana Hull.To contact the reporters on this story: Pavel Alpeyev in Tokyo at palpeyev@bloomberg.net;Brian Eckhouse in New York at beckhouse@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, ;Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Chester DawsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coronavirus Concerns Further Plague China Auto Industry
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    Coronavirus Concerns Further Plague China Auto Industry

    Amid coronavirus, the China auto industry has taken a severe beating of late, with shutdown of factories, dealerships with less customer traffic, supply-chain disruption and annual motor show delay.

  • Panasonic to exit solar production at Tesla's NY plant as partnership frays
    Reuters

    Panasonic to exit solar production at Tesla's NY plant as partnership frays

    TOKYO/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Panasonic Corp said it would exit solar cell production at Tesla Inc's New York plant, the latest sign of strain in a partnership where Panasonic's status as the U.S. electric vehicle (EV) maker's exclusive battery supplier is ending. The move increases uncertainty over Tesla's solar business which is already under scrutiny, having been drastically scaled back since the U.S. firm bought it for $2.6 billion in 2016. Tesla has informed New York that Panasonic's withdrawal "has no bearing on Tesla's current operations", the state said in a statement.

  • The 25 best-performing large cities in the US: Milken Institute
    Yahoo Finance

    The 25 best-performing large cities in the US: Milken Institute

    The Milken Institute is out with its annual Best-Performing Cities Index, and San Francisco takes the top spot for 2020.

  • Panasonic to exit solar production at Tesla's New York plant as partnership frays
    Reuters

    Panasonic to exit solar production at Tesla's New York plant as partnership frays

    TOKYO/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Panasonic Corp said it would exit solar cell production at Tesla Inc's New York plant, the latest sign of strain in a partnership where Panasonic's status as the U.S. electric vehicle (EV) maker's exclusive battery supplier is ending. The move increases uncertainty over Tesla's solar business which is already under scrutiny, having been drastically scaled back since the U.S. firm bought it for $2.6 billion in 2016. Tesla has informed New York that Panasonic's withdrawal "has no bearing on Tesla's current operations", the state said in a statement.

  • Tesla’s Autopilot, Cell Phone Use Blamed in 2018 Fatal Crash
    Bloomberg

    Tesla’s Autopilot, Cell Phone Use Blamed in 2018 Fatal Crash

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. crash investigators faulted Tesla Inc.’s Autopilot system and the driver’s distraction by a mobile device for a fatal accident in 2018 and called on Apple Inc. and other mobile phone makers to do more to keep motorists’ attention on the road.Tesla was heavily criticized for not doing enough to keep drivers from using its driver-assist function inappropriately. American regulators, which have guidelines but no firm rules for the emerging automated driving systems, were also attacked by the safety board.“It’s time to stop enabling drivers in any partially automated vehicle to pretend that they have driverless cars, because they don’t have driverless cars,” National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt said.The hearing was a searing critique of how Tesla and other carmakers have introduced new technologies that automate aspects of driving but still require constant human supervision, and of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s light-touch approach to regulating the safety of those systems.Even though the Tesla SUV in the 2018 crash in northern California had previously veered toward a concrete barrier, the driver, an Apple employee, allowed the semi-autonomous system to essentially steer itself as it passed that same location and moved toward a highway barrier, the NTSB concluded. The driver failed to intervene because he was distracted, likely because he was playing a game on a mobile phone provided by his company, which lacked a policy prohibiting employees from using devices while driving, the NTSB found.The NTSB has for years issued warnings about distracted driving and its deadly toll on the roadways. During the hearing, it called on Apple and other mobile phone manufacturers to develop protections to prevent misuse of electronic devices behind the wheel as a default setting.The agency also urged the NHTSA to conduct a fresh evaluation of Autopilot and take enforcement action if necessary if the agency finds defects.“We urge Tesla to continue to work on improving their Autopilot technology and for NHTSA to fulfill its oversight responsibility to ensure that corrective action is taken when necessary,” Sumwalt said.The death of 38-year-old Apple engineer Walter Huang in March 2018 in Silicon Valley prompted the NTSB to issue its strongest findings to date on safety risks posed by automated driving systems and driver distraction by mobile devices.“Limitations within the Autopilot system caused the SUV to veer towards the area with a concrete barrier that it ultimately struck, which the driver didn’t attempt to stop due to distraction,” the board found.NTSB recommended that both mobile device manufacturers such as Apple, Google and Samsung Electronics Co., as well as employers more broadly, do more to combat distracted driving.Mobile phone manufacturers should lock out features on the devices as a default setting, rather than as an optional feature that must be activated manually, the NTSB said. Employers should adopt policies banning non-emergency mobile phone use by employees when behind the wheel.The NTSB posted a document on Monday in its public record on the crash showing Apple didn’t have a policy on distracted driving.“I checked around with various groups and we do not have a policy related to phone use and driving,” wrote an Apple representative in an email response to the NTSB, which was posted to the safety board’s public investigative files on Monday.An Apple spokesman said the company expects its employees to follow the law. Tesla didn’t respond to a request for comment but has said it has updated Autopilot in part to issue more frequent warnings to inattentive drivers and that its research shows drivers are safer using the system than not. Tesla has also repeatedly stressed that drivers must pay attention while using Autopilot.The combination of growing mobile device use in semi-autonomous cars, in which drivers can take their eyes off the road for long periods, is a combustible mix, said NTSB Vice Chairman Bruce Landsberg.“What this crash illustrates is not only do we have the old kind of distraction” Lansberg said. Partly-automated driving systems present “yet another kind, which is the automation complacency of the system almost kind of always works, except when it doesn’t.”NTSB board member Jennifer Homendy criticized the NHTSA for issuing a recent statement saying it was trying to limit regulations to make cars more affordable.“What we should not do is lower the bar on safety,” Homendy said. “That shouldn’t even be considered for an agency that has the word safety in its name.”NHTSA said in a statement it was aware of the NTSB’s report and would review it. It also said distracted driving remains a concern and that drivers of every motor vehicle available currently on sale are required to remain in control at all times.It is also conducting more than a dozen of its own investigations into Tesla crashes linked to its semi-autonomous system known as Autopilot. Tesla is one of the leading developers of automated driving technology.Warnings to DriverHuang’s Tesla struck the concrete highway barrier at about 70 miles (113 kilometers) per hour. His hands weren’t detected on the steering wheel for about one-third of the drive and the car twice issued automated warnings to him.A protective barrier on the highway designed to reduce the crash impact wasn’t in place, the NTSB found.In addition, Tesla and government agencies haven’t bothered to respond to NTSB’s recommendations related to an earlier, similar crash.Smartphone manufacturers and software developers have taken some steps to address distracted driving. Apple’s iPhone, for example, has a feature to block text message and other notifications when driving that a user can activate in the phone’s settings.“The challenge is that they’re all passive systems. They require you as the owner of the phone to take that action, and many won’t or don’t because they don’t have to,” said Kelly Nantel, vice president of roadway safety at the National Safety Council.While the safety board stopped short of concluding that NHTSA’s lack of actions were part of the cause of the crash, it found that the regulator hadn’t done enough to set safety standards and called its approach to semi-automated vehicles “misguided.”Separately, the NTSB is prepared to cite the highway-safety regulator’s actions in another fatal Tesla crash as a contributing factor.In a March 2019 crash in Delray Beach, Florida, a Tesla drove into the side of a truck without braking, killing the driver. The conclusions of the investigation haven’t been published, but were read by Homendy during Tuesday’s meeting.(Updates with details from hearing, beginning in the fourth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Ryan Beene in Washington at rbeene@bloomberg.net;Alan Levin in Washington at alevin24@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesla and U.S. regulators strongly criticized over role of Autopilot in crash
    Reuters

    Tesla and U.S. regulators strongly criticized over role of Autopilot in crash

    NTSB board members questioned Tesla's design of its semi-automated driving assistance system and condemned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for a "hands-off approach" to regulating the increasingly popular systems. NHTSA has "taken a nonregulatory approach to automated vehicle safety" and should "complete a further evaluation of the Tesla Autopilot system to ensure the deployed technology does not pose an unreasonable safety risk," NTSB said.

  • IBD Live: Analyzing Tesla Stock; How To Manage The Coronavirus Sell-Of
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    IBD Live: Analyzing Tesla Stock; How To Manage The Coronavirus Sell-Of

    The IBD Live Team assessed Tesla stock on Thursday as the market continued to fall amid the coronavirus sell-off. Now that IBD has officially changed our market outlook to "market in correction" from the prior "market uptrend" designation, is it time to take profits in Tesla or continue to hold it through the sell-off?

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