UBER - Uber Technologies, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
30.68
+0.25 (+0.82%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

32.39 +1.71 (5.57%)
Before hours: 5:38AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close30.43
Open31.02
Bid32.70 x 1400
Ask0.00 x 1200
Day's range30.51 - 31.57
52-week range13.71 - 45.63
Volume14,981,137
Avg. volume29,295,493
Market cap53.199B
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-6.66
Earnings date06 Aug 2020 - 10 Aug 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est40.74
  • Uber reportedly agrees to acquire Postmates for $2.65 billion
    TechCrunch

    Uber reportedly agrees to acquire Postmates for $2.65 billion

    Uber has reportedly agreed to buy Postmates in an all-stock deal worth $2.65 billion. According to Bloomberg, the deal may be announced on Monday morning. Like other travel- and transportation-related businesses, Uber's ride-hailing segment has been negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, due to shelter-in-place orders throughout the United States.

  • Uber, Postmates Agree on $2.65 Billion All-Stock Deal
    Bloomberg

    Uber, Postmates Agree on $2.65 Billion All-Stock Deal

    (Bloomberg) -- Uber Technologies Inc. has agreed to acquire Postmates Inc. in a $2.65 billion all-stock takeover expected to be announced as soon as Monday morning in the U.S., according to people familiar with the matter.Uber Eats head Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty is expected to continue to run Uber’s combined delivery business, according to a person who asked not to be identified discussing a private deal. Under their agreement, Postmates Chief Executive Officer Bastian Lehmann and his team will stay on to manage Postmates as a separate service, another person said.The takeover would help Uber gain ground against privately-held DoorDash Inc., the current market leader in U.S. food delivery. While Postmates hasn’t kept pace with DoorDash, it maintains a strong position in Los Angeles and the American Southwest, both of which could be valuable to Uber Eats.Representatives for Uber and Postmates declined to comment.Read more: Uber, Posting First-Ever Decline in Rides, Says Worst Is OverUber and Postmates had held discussions on and off for about four years but the talks accelerated about a week ago after Uber approached the latter firm, one of the people said. The move for Postmates comes on the heels of Uber’s failed bid to acquire publicly traded GrubHub Inc., which was scooped up by Europe’s Just Eat Takeaway.com NV for $7.3 billion. Uber’s board of directors has approved the deal, a person said, though the plans could still be subject to change.Uber closed at $30.68 on Friday, after it had gone up more than 4% on initial reports of its bid for Postmates.Founded in 2011, Postmates was one of the first to let customers in the U.S. order meal delivery using a mobile app. However, competition has intensified in recent years and Postmates has fallen to a distant fourth. The company said in February 2019 that it had filed paperwork confidentially for an initial public offering but never went public. It raised private capital last year in a deal that valued the business at $2.4 billion.(Updates with Lehmann’s new role from the second paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Uber, Postmates agree on $2.65 billion all-stock deal - Bloomberg News
    Reuters

    Uber, Postmates agree on $2.65 billion all-stock deal - Bloomberg News

    The deal has been approved by Uber's board and could be announced as soon as Monday, Bloomberg reported, adding that Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, head of Uber's food delivery business, Uber Eats, is expected to continue to run the combined delivery business. Uber and Postmates did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment. Last week, Reuters reported that Postmates had revived plans for an initial public offering following dealmaking in the U.S. online food delivery service sector that sparked acquisition interest in the company.

  • Uber, Postmates agree on $2.65 billion all-stock deal: Bloomberg News
    Reuters

    Uber, Postmates agree on $2.65 billion all-stock deal: Bloomberg News

    The deal has been approved by Uber's board and could be announced as soon as Monday, Bloomberg reported, adding that Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, head of Uber's food delivery business, Uber Eats, is expected to continue to run the combined delivery business. Uber and Postmates did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment. Last week, Reuters reported that Postmates had revived plans for an initial public offering following dealmaking in the U.S. online food delivery service sector that sparked acquisition interest in the company.

  • Why Uber's Stock Fell 14.4% in June
    Motley Fool

    Why Uber's Stock Fell 14.4% in June

    Uber (NYSE: UBER) saw its stock price decline by 14.4% in June, according to data provided by S&P Global Market Intelligence. With no end in sight, investors should brace for more red ink from the company.

  • Uber Technologies (UBER) Gets Flex CEO as New Board Member
    Zacks

    Uber Technologies (UBER) Gets Flex CEO as New Board Member

    Uber Technologies (UBER) welcomes Revathi Advaithi aboard as an independent director and member of the Audit Committee.

  • Lime puts Jump bikes back on London streets
    TechCrunch

    Lime puts Jump bikes back on London streets

    Jump bikes are returning to London — this time through its new owner Lime . London is the first city in Europe to see Jump bikes return since Uber offloaded the company to Lime in a complex deal that unfolded in May. Lime raised $170 million in a funding round led by Uber, along with other existing investors Alphabet, Bain Capital Ventures and GV. As part of the deal, Lime acquired Jump, the electric bike and scooter division that Uber acquired in 2018 for around $200 million.

  • Uber Is Coming to Tokyo After Six Years in Japan
    Bloomberg

    Uber Is Coming to Tokyo After Six Years in Japan

    (Bloomberg) -- After six years in Japan, Uber Technologies Inc. is finally coming to Tokyo.Starting Friday, users in the Japanese capital will be able to hail taxis using the Uber app, according to Tom White, who heads the company’s operations in the country. Uber is partnering with three local taxi operators to make 600 cars available primarily in the city’s central business district and the popular areas of Shinagawa, Akihabara and Asakusa.The U.S. company has done things a little differently in the world’s No 3. economy, which has strict regulations covering ride-sharing. The San Francisco-based company has focused on growing its food-delivery business, which now encompasses about 25,000 restaurants in 20 prefectures. For rides, it’s built partnerships with taxi companies in provincial cities, including the popular tourist destinations of Kyoto, Osaka and Hiroshima. In Tokyo, its offering has been limited to black-car hires till now.“We wanted to do it right, having learned lessons in smaller markets,” White said in an interview. “We are in a better position to not just offer a good service to riders, but also to have lasting relationships with taxi companies.”In Tokyo, Uber is partnering with Hinomaru Limousine Co., Tokyo MK Corp. and Ecosystem and is in talks with more operators, White said. The goal is to extend coverage to all of the capital’s central districts by the end of the year. That brings the total number of Japanese cities where the service is available to 12.Despite the regulatory challenges, Japan has only grown in importance for Uber. After years of costly battles, ride-hailing giants have struck deals to stay out of each other’s core markets. In 2016, Uber ceded China to Didi Chuxing in exchange for a stake in its former rival. It pulled out of Russia in a similar manner the following year, and sold its Southeast Asian operations to Grab in 2018. That left few reservoirs of untapped growth.Despite being the second-largest taxi market in the world -- generating some $15 billion in annual revenue -- most locals in Japan still hail a cab by flagging one down in the street. Apps are used for less than 5% of the rides, White said. Others have also spotted the opportunity. Sony Corp., startup Japan Taxi and China’s Didi are among those that have rolled out competing taxi-hailing apps.“We are very much still in the early days,” White said. “There is still tremendous opportunity in this market. And the success of Uber Eats shows that people are open to the brand.”(Corrects size of Japanese market in the penultimate paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    SoftBank's Latest Unicorn IPO Is Just Delightful

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s been six months since we got to enjoy a SoftBank Vision Fund exit.(1) Thankfully, Lemonade Inc. doesn’t disappoint.Founded in Israel and based in New York, its stock had a great first-day pop, despite pricing below its most recent private valuation. The company is a web-based provider of insurance to renters and landlords. After asking a few questions, such as address and living situation, Lemonade gives a quote for monthly coverage.Management believes that Lemonade has a technological edge in calculating risk that will ensure it collects more in premiums than it will pay out in claims. Yet a look at Lemonade’s mission statement tells what you really need to know about why this is a very SoftBank kind of company. Harness technology and social impact to be the world's most loved insurance company.Seriously. Lemonade doesn’t just want to be loved. “We are making insurance more delightful, more affordable, more precise, and more socially impactful,” it promises (emphasis added). The words “delight” or “delightful” appear 34 times in its prospectus.When you remember that SoftBank Group Corp.’s most famous, and infamous, investment to date — The We Co. — had a mission to “elevate the world’s consciousness,” it’s understandable why boss Masayoshi Son just couldn’t resist. Son’s outfit loves Lemonade so much that it owns 21.8%, diluted from 27.3% after the $319 million offering in New York.Like a couple of other SoftBank unicorns that have since gone public — Uber Technologies Inc. and Slack Technologies Inc. — Lemonade has been losing money. CEO Daniel Schreiber told Bloomberg Television’s Emily Chang that the company is on a path to profitability, with losses per dollar of insurance premiums sold shrinking. More recently, business has been “little impacted by the epidemic, much to our surprise,” he said.In truth, earnings don’t actually matter to investors as long as the shares rise and SoftBank gets to book paper profits.This debut comes just as the SoftBank and its Vision Fund recover from a disastrous March quarter, followed by a rebound in the June period. According to the prospectus, Lemonade was valued at $42.21 per share in its last funding round, which closed in September. An initial offer document, dated June 30, had Lemonade priced between $26 and $28 apiece, which means SoftBank would have taken a haircut of around 33%, or about $170 million, in the three months to the end of June.The massive 139% pop Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange reverses SoftBank’s loss immediately, but can only be realized in the current quarter, which still has a long way to go. Buckle up for another roller-coaster ride.What’s even more SoftBank-like about this investment is the ownership structure. According to the prospectus, SoftBank and other venture capital firms, along with officers and directors, beneficially own a mathematically impossible 135% of the stock.On paper, Schreiber and co-founder Shai Wininger hold 28.3% and 29% respectively, while Mwashuma Nyatta — a managing partner at SoftBank Group International — has 21.8%. Except, not really. Those three don’t own all of that stock, but they’re the only members of a  “joint investment committee having sole voting and dispositive control” over the shares held by SoftBank. So, while SoftBank owns a fifth of the company, it’s handing that voting power back to the founders, who then claim “beneficial ownership.” Having seen the need to push Travis Kalanick out of Uber and Adam Neumann from WeWork, you’d have thought SoftBank may have learned its lesson about giving founders too much control. To be clear, there’s no suggestion that Schreiber or Wininger deserve to be shown the door, but when you own 22% of the stock, you’d think that a certain amount of voting rights may come with it.But this is SoftBank, and we’ve all learned to expect its investments and exits to be somewhat “delightful.”(1) The previous IPO, OneConnect Financial Technology Co., has gone on to be a blockbuster.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Uber adds another director to its board: Flex CEO Revathi Advaithi
    TechCrunch

    Uber adds another director to its board: Flex CEO Revathi Advaithi

    Uber has a new, independent board member, shows a new SEC filing: CEO Revathi Advaithi of 51-year-old Flex, which is among the world’s largest electronic manufacturers and competes against Taiwan’s Foxconn Technology. Advaithi, a mechanical engineer who grew up in India with four sisters, was appointed to the top job in February of last year after spending roughly 10 years with the electronic manufacturing company Eaton, where she was COO and oversaw its global electrical business. Specifically, Flex once counted among its biggest customers the Chinese company Huawei, for which it provided contract services for products like smartphones and 5G base stations.

  • Postmates Not Waiting on Uber Offer As It Readies IPO Filing Next Week
    Motley Fool

    Postmates Not Waiting on Uber Offer As It Readies IPO Filing Next Week

    Although Uber Technologies (NYSE: UBER) is reportedly negotiating to acquire Postmates for $2.6 billion, the meal delivery service isn't waiting around for an offer that may not ultimately materialize. Fox Business News reports Postmates is planning on filing the necessary paperwork for an initial public offering (IPO) that could come as soon as next week. A Morgan Stanley analysis shows the sector generates about $30 billion in revenue from the fees and commissions charged for delivery.

  • Is SoftBank Stock a Buy?
    Motley Fool

    Is SoftBank Stock a Buy?

    The bulls were impressed by its $100 billion tech-focused Vision Fund, which it co-owns with other major investors. The bears often highlight the messy performance of SoftBank's investments, including Uber's disappointing IPO and WeWork's failed IPO, the slow growth of its domestic telecom business, and the potential impact of the new Japanese recession.

  • Uber extends mask requirement for drivers, riders, launches new campaign
    Reuters

    Uber extends mask requirement for drivers, riders, launches new campaign

    The company in a new campaign video showing Uber drivers and food delivery workers said wearing a mask was a way to thank them for their essential services during weeks of lockdown. Since the requirement took effect in May, Uber drivers have needed to take a selfie to verify they are wearing a mask before starting work. A company executive in May said Uber was looking into developing a similar feature to verify riders' compliance with the policy.

  • In Brazil, delivery drivers for Uber, Rappi and others protest amid pandemic
    Reuters

    In Brazil, delivery drivers for Uber, Rappi and others protest amid pandemic

    More than a thousand food delivery drivers on motorcycles gathered in São Paulo on Wednesday to protest their work conditions, set by Uber Technologies Inc and makers of other apps, as their services remain in high demand due to coronavirus lockdowns. The drivers seek better pay and improved health measures, with Brazil now a coronavirus epicenter and delivery workers facing exposure to the virus. Drivers paraded through Sao Paulo's Paulista Avenue, the city's main thoroughfare, blocking traffic, and also protested in other Brazilian cities.

  • Wirecard Is a Wild Card, Even Without SoftBank Money
    Bloomberg

    Wirecard Is a Wild Card, Even Without SoftBank Money

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What’s more perplexing, a company that can’t seem to avoid due diligence failures, or one that throws its name behind a controversial partner without putting in a dime? Investors in SoftBank Group Corp. may have seen a bit of both. Now, its entanglement with Wirecard AG leaves shareholders wondering exactly what kind of business they’ve been sinking their money into.Over the past year, SoftBank’s $80 billion startup splurge has quickly unraveled, as WeWork imploded and the initial public offering of Uber Technologies Inc. fell flat. But unlike WeWork, Wirecard won’t force SoftBank to write down any assets — because the tech conglomerate never put money into Wirecard itself.Instead, SoftBank facilitated a 900 million euro ($1 billion) convertible bond deal for the German digital payments company. Without requiring any SoftBank cash, the deal appeared to give the company’s stamp of approval to Wirecard, which had faced scrutiny over its accounting for years before admitting that 1.9 billion euros had gone missing from its accounts.(1) Wirecard’s shares soared more than 25% between the announcement of the tie-up and its signing.The outlines of this offering emerged in April 2019. It was eventually sold to Mubadala Investment Co. — Abu Dhabi’s sovereign fund, and the second biggest backer of the Vision Fund after Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund — as well as a few senior SoftBank employees, according to the Financial Times.This instrument gave investors the option to convert their holdings into 6.9 million Wirecard shares, or 5.6% of the company at the time, at 130 euros per share — just over a 5% premium. To convince its existing holders to accept this dilution, Wirecard talked at length of the “economic benefits” of a strategic partnership with SoftBank, from geographic expansion into Japan and South Korea, to access to the Vision Fund’s vast portfolio, according to an invitation to Wirecard’s annual general meeting last June. “The potential on the equity side is much, much higher than the potential dilution,” then-CEO Markus Braun, who has since resigned, said at the time of the announcement. SoftBank echoed similar sentiments. But shortly after Sept. 18, 2019 — when the companies’ strategic tie-up was signed, and Wirecard’s stock was trading at 158 euros per share — Credit Suisse Group AG repackaged and resold those instruments, which were issued just hours before, to a broader group of investors at substantially less attractive terms. In other words, Mubadala et al got some of their Wirecard stake for free, thanks to SoftBank. Now that Wirecard has filed for insolvency, one can’t help wondering why SoftBank got involved in the first place. After a series of high-profile due diligence errors, SoftBank can ill afford any brush with a company battling corporate governance issues. This question is particularly relevant right now, because the Japanese tech giant is rapidly closing its conglomerate discount through aggressive share buybacks and sales of its most prized assets.On March 23, founder Masayoshi Son unveiled a 4.5 trillion yen ($42 billion) asset sale and an additional 2 trillion yen share repurchase over the next year. SoftBank’s conglomerate discount has since narrowed to just 29%, compared with 65% during its mid-March low, according to Bernstein Research. On average, SoftBank sported a valuation discount of 38% after the initial closing of the Vision Fund in 2017, using the firm’s methodology.SoftBank has more than doubled in market value since mid-March, and is now up 15% for the year. But once the company sells off its best holdings, its net-asset-value discount is only set to widen again. Such metrics reflect business behavior, history, strategy and vision, all of which are getting worse at SoftBank. As the Wirecard drama unfolds, it may well turn into this year's WeWork, another public-relations disaster for Son.(1) In early 2019, the Financial Times published a series of investigative reports questioning Wirecard’s internal controls.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian markets. She previously wrote on markets for Barron's, following a career as an investment banker, and is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Rebuffed by Grubhub, Uber Eats Seeks a Deal With Postmates
    Motley Fool

    Rebuffed by Grubhub, Uber Eats Seeks a Deal With Postmates

    Last November, Uber (NYSE: UBER) CEO Dara Khosrowshahi outlined the company's strategy for its food delivery business, Uber Eats. What was left unspoken in that message was that Uber would also pull out of markets where it didn't believe it could be one of the top two players, as it seeks to bring the historically unprofitable food delivery business out of the red. Since last October, Uber Eats has exited South Korea, India, Czech Republic, Egypt, Honduras, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Uruguay, and Ukraine, as it's eyed a pre-pandemic goal of reaching profitability on an adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) basis by the end of this year, which it since pushed back to 2021.

  • For Uber Eats, a Postmates Deal Is Better Than Nothing
    Bloomberg

    For Uber Eats, a Postmates Deal Is Better Than Nothing

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Uber Technologies Inc. needs to act fast to buttress its food-delivery business. It now has a second chance and shouldn’t blow it.Late Monday, the New York Times reported that Uber Eats-parent Uber Technologies Inc. made an offer to acquire Postmates Inc., citing people familiar with the matter. A deal for Postmates would value the company at around $2.6 billion and could be announced next week or sooner, according to the Wall Street Journal. Reuters also reported on Monday that Postmates is considering an initial public offering as well.This isn’t Uber’s first attempt at consolidation for its food-delivery unit. Earlier this year, the company was in serious negotiations to merge with Grubhub, but lost out in a bidding war to Just Eat Takeaway.com NV. The European competitor announced a deal to buy Grubhub for $7.3 billion in early June. While this second option isn’t as ideal as the first for Uber, it’s still worth trying, and for the same reason: A merger would improve profitability and help make Uber Eats viable. As an industry in aggregate, Uber Eats and its three other U.S. food delivery competitors — DoorDash, Grubhub and Postmates — has been hemorrhaging cash as they compete against each other with lavish promotions and deals. Uber Eats alone lost more than $300 million in adjusted Ebitda, a measure of profitability, in its latest reported quarter, while Grubhub posted a $33 million loss for its first quarter.If Uber can take a player out of the equation, it would help rationalize the level of discounting, thereby lowering losses. Further, an Uber Eats-Postmates merger will likely generate significant cost savings as any overlapping administrative expenses can be eliminated.A Postmates acquisition also has the benefit that it would be more amenable on antitrust grounds. Some analysts have said worries over potential regulatory issues were part of what nixed the Uber Eats-Grubhub combination, which would have united two big players:An Uber Eats deal with Postmates would boost the combined companies’ total market share to around 30%. It would still allow for a robust level of competition for much of the country and be less likely of an issue for regulators to block. So, while Grubhub would have been a better deal for Uber with its larger market power and higher potential for cost synergies, a deal with Postmates is better than the status quo. Plus, it comes at a lower purchase price as well.The clock is ticking. Uber’s status quo isn’t sustainable. Yes, the company has a strong balance sheet with $9 billion in cash as of the end of its last quarter, but it also lost more than a billion dollars in those three months, too. Even a big cash pile won’t last long, if it doesn’t get its losses under control. A deal with Postmates would help fix that.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Uber Looks to Buy Rival Postmates for $2.6 Billion
    Motley Fool

    Uber Looks to Buy Rival Postmates for $2.6 Billion

    It looks like Uber Technologies (NYSE: UBER) didn't abandon the mergers and acquisitions market after failing to buy food delivery specialist Grubhub (NYSE: GRUB). The Wall Street Journal reports Uber is now in talks to acquire Postmates for $2.6 billion in a deal that could be announced next week or even sooner. Failing a merger, Postmates may go public.

  • Uber Is Said to Be in Talks to Buy Delivery Rival Postmates
    Bloomberg

    Uber Is Said to Be in Talks to Buy Delivery Rival Postmates

    (Bloomberg) -- Uber Technologies Inc. is in talks to purchase Postmates Inc., said a person familiar with the discussions, seeking to expand food delivery services in the U.S. and capitalize on a surge in orders during the coronavirus pandemic.Postmates is alternatively exploring various paths to go public, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the discussions are private. One option it’s considering would involve merging with a special purpose acquisition company, the person said.In the talks with Uber, a deal could value Postmates at $2.6 billion, according to the Wall Street Journal. Representatives for Uber and Postmates declined to comment. The New York Times reported earlier Monday that Uber had made an offer to acquire Postmates.Uber shares were up 4.1%, to $30.83 Tuesday morning in New York.Founded in 2011, Postmates was one of the first to let customers in the U.S. order meal delivery using a smartphone app. However, competition has grown intense in recent years, and Postmates is now a distant fourth. The company said in February 2019 that it had filed paperwork confidentially for an initial public offering but never went public. It raised a private investment later that year valuing the business at $2.4 billion.The effects of the virus have boosted food delivery, though it hasn’t resulted in profits. The market is highly competitive, and the margins are slim. A deal could help Uber Eats, Uber’s delivery arm, at a time when the pandemic has decimated Uber’s main business of ride hailing. In recent months, Uber has cut about a quarter of its staff and shed side businesses. The food delivery unit, Uber Eats, has been a bright spot for the company as more customers have ordered in, facing widespread restaurant closures.Postmates wasn’t Uber’s first choice for an acquisition. Uber attempted to buy Grubhub this year, but the proposed deal fell through earlier this month when European rival Just Eat Takeaway.com NV bought it instead. Uber’s bid for Grubhub, one of the larger players in the U.S. food delivery market, was likely to have raised antitrust concerns, according to analysts.(Updates shares in fourth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Uber (UBER) is Reportedly Looking to Purchase Postmates
    Zacks

    Uber (UBER) is Reportedly Looking to Purchase Postmates

    After the Grubhub-deal failure, Uber (UBER) is said to be in talks to buy Postmates, its smaller rival in the food-delivery space.

  • Uber bus just around the corner on post-pandemic public transit map
    Reuters

    Uber bus just around the corner on post-pandemic public transit map

    Urban transportation's transformation has shifted up a gear as the coronavirus crisis turns travel habits on their head, with Uber making allies of public transit systems by now offering to sell them its software expertise. This means Marin County's Transportation Authority will next month allow passengers in the San Francisco Bay area to book a trip through the Uber app, but rather than someone's private car they will ride wheelchair-accessible public vans. From the streets of Utah's Salt Lake City to Missouri's St. Louis and New Jersey's Jersey City, more than 120 U.S. transit agencies have launched collaborations with ride-hail firms in the past two years, data analyzed by Reuters shows.

  • Ride-hailing giant Ola adds tipping option to its app
    TechCrunch

    Ride-hailing giant Ola adds tipping option to its app

    You can now tip your Ola driver. The Indian ride-hailing giant said on Tuesday that it has rolled out this feature to its users in India, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom -- all the nations where it currently operates. Ola said riders in each market will see a range of denominations they can pick as the amount they wish to tip digitally.

  • After losing Grubhub, Uber reportedly hails Postmates
    TechCrunch

    After losing Grubhub, Uber reportedly hails Postmates

    Uber has reportedly made an offer to buy food delivery service Postmates, according to The New York Times. For those who have been paying attention to Uber, this appetite is not new, albeit consistent. A little over a month ago, the ride-hailing company was reportedly pursuing an acquisition of Grubhub, another food delivery company.

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