UBS - UBS Group AG

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
12.15
-0.07 (-0.57%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

12.24 +0.09 (0.74%)
Pre-market: 4:15AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close12.22
Open12.11
Bid12.25 x 29200
Ask0.00 x 1100
Day's range12.07 - 12.20
52-week range11.32 - 16.68
Volume3,070,660
Avg. volume2,844,901
Market cap46.548B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.10
PE ratio (TTM)11.38
EPS (TTM)1.07
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.69 (5.62%)
Ex-dividend date2019-05-06
1y target est16.00
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • UBS downgrades GE after 42% runup this year: 'Taking a breather'
    CNBC23 hours ago

    UBS downgrades GE after 42% runup this year: 'Taking a breather'

    UBS lowers its rating on shares of General Electric to neutral from buy.

  • Business Wire4 days ago

    Mariia Eroshin CFA, CFP® Appointed as Financial Advisor at San Francisco UBS Private Wealth Management Office

    UBS Private Wealth Management is proud to announce that Mariia Eroshin, CFA, CFP®, has joined the Northwest Private Wealth Management market, as a Financial Advisor and Senior Vice President—Wealth Management in San Francisco. Eroshin has had a long and successful career in the financial services industry, holding senior roles at several other firms including a multi-family office before joining UBS. For the last 11 years, Mariia has been an Adjunct Faculty at University of San Francisco, teaching in a Master of Science in Financial Analysis Program.

  • CNBC4 days ago

    Deutsche Bank gets its first broker upgrade after mass restructure

    UBS has become the first broker to upgrade Deutsche Bank's stock following its initiation of a historic restructuring program.

  • Deutsche Bank (DB) Restructuring: What You Need to Know & What's Next
    Zacks7 days ago

    Deutsche Bank (DB) Restructuring: What You Need to Know & What's Next

    This weekend, German lender Deutsche Bank (DB) announced a major restructuring plan that it will undertake over the next four years. The restructuring is projected to cost a total of $8.3 billion and is to be completed by the end of 2022.

  • Business Wire8 days ago

    UBS Declares Coupon Payments on 22 ETRACS Exchange Traded Notes

    PYPE: linked to the NYSE® Pickens Core Midstream™ Index

  • China to Speed Up Pace of Opening Markets: Banks to Gain?
    Zacks13 days ago

    China to Speed Up Pace of Opening Markets: Banks to Gain?

    Foreign firms are set to benefit as China plans to end all ownership limits within its financial sector a year earlier than previously stated.

  • Business Wire18 days ago

    UBS Advisor Thomas Mahoney Named to Forbes' List of Best-in-State Wealth Advisors

    UBS Financial Services Inc. announced today that Thomas Mahoney, a Private Wealth Advisor at The Mahoney Group in Los Angeles, has been named to the Forbes' Best-in-State Top Wealth Advisors list, for the state of California. Mahoney is a 32-year veteran of the financial services industry and is respected as an intense, focused and highly service-oriented professional. After receiving his B.B.A. in Finance from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mahoney earned an M.B.A. from Pepperdine University in California.

  • UBS cuts Tesla forecast: 'Deliveries may provide a pop, but earnings may cause a drop'
    CNBC18 days ago

    UBS cuts Tesla forecast: 'Deliveries may provide a pop, but earnings may cause a drop'

    UBS slashes its earnings forecast and price target for Elon Musk's Telsa.

  • Reuters25 days ago

    Former UBS China banker given 9 years in prison for insider trade

    BEIJING/HONG KONG (Reuters) - A former UBS banker in China has been sentenced to nine years in prison by a Shanghai court for disclosing inside information related to an acquisition deal in 2017, court documents show and sources with knowledge of the case said. The documents said that Sang shared information with two associates about a Chinese shipping firm's acquisition of a Hong Kong company. Two people with knowledge of the case said that Sang was a former vice president in the investment banking department at UBS Securities, the Swiss bank's Chinese brokerage unit.

  • UBS scrambles to calm rich Chinese clients over 'pig' comment: sources
    Reuters25 days ago

    UBS scrambles to calm rich Chinese clients over 'pig' comment: sources

    SINGAPORE/HONG KONG (Reuters) - UBS has asked its senior client advisers to call or even meet private banking customers from China who have raised concerns about a comment from one of the bank's economists that some people interpreted a racist slur, sources told Reuters. A reference to Chinese pigs was made in an inflation analysis podcast by UBS global chief economist Paul Donovan, who has since been put on a leave of absence as the bank reviews the matter. The Swiss private banking giant has told senior managers to prioritse any concerns on the matter raised by customers in China, a key market for UBS, and to explain its position on the remark and actions taken so far, the sources familiar with the matter said.

  • UBS Seeks to Defuse ‘Chinese Pig’ Outcry in Regulator Meetings
    Bloomberg25 days ago

    UBS Seeks to Defuse ‘Chinese Pig’ Outcry in Regulator Meetings

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.UBS Group AG is taking steps to ensure its head start over competitors in China isn’t jeopardized by controversial comments by a senior economist that already cost the firm at least one bond deal.In previously scheduled meetings with Chinese regulators this week, senior Asia-based UBS executives said that economist Paul Donovan’s use of the phrase “Chinese pig” in an analysis of swine flu wasn’t meant to be derogatory, according to people with knowledge of the matter. Regulators responded that the bank should take extra care with the language it uses in research, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the information is private.UBS executives came away from the discussions with the impression that the firm’s China business would avoid a material hit from regulators, the people said.The meetings suggest a measured response by Chinese authorities after Donovan’s comments sparked a social-media outcry. While the country’s State-Owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission has informally advised government-run companies to temporarily suspend hiring UBS for deals, it has stopped short of issuing a ban, people familiar with the matter said.UBS has been quick to capitalize on China’s moves to further open its financial markets, last year becoming the first global bank to get permission to take a majority stake in an existing onshore securities joint venture. The firestorm over Donovan’s comments, made in a regular audio note, illustrates the balancing act foreign investment banks face in China at a time of heightened political tensions globally, with domestic rivals willing to seize on any missteps.China Railway Construction Corp., a state-owned infrastructure company, excluded the bank from a bond sale last week. UBS expects to lose a few more debt mandates for smaller government-run companies, but the roles are junior and the loss of fees negligible, a person familiar with the firm said.“Does this matter? It matters if you are a Chinese pig,” Donovan said in his audio commentary, which was emailed last week. “It matters if you like eating pork in China. It does not really matter to the rest of the world. China does not export a lot of food. The only global relevance would be if Chinese inflation influenced politics and other policies.”A spokesman for UBS, which publicly apologized for Donovan’s remarks and put him on leave, declined to comment. SASAC didn’t reply to a faxed request for comment. Last week, an association representing Chinese-owned securities firms in Hong Kong called for UBS to dismiss those involved.UBS raised its stake in UBS Securities Co., the local joint venture, to 51% in December. Chief Executive Officer Sergio Ermotti has already moved to take advantage of winning control, beefing up the ranks of senior executives at the JV. For UBS, already the world’s largest private bank, the swelling ranks of millionaires in China represents a huge untapped business opportunity.JPMorgan Chase & Co., Nomura Holdings Inc. and Morgan Stanley have also bought majority stakes in their Chinese JVs or started taking steps to do so. In about two years, China is expected to let foreign banks purchase full ownership -- a move that may spur them to pour more resources into their local operations.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Cathy Chan in Hong Kong at kchan14@bloomberg.net;Steven Yang in Beijing at kyang74@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Philip Lagerkranser at lagerkranser@bloomberg.net, ;Shiyin Chen at schen37@bloomberg.net, Michael PattersonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com27 days ago

    Advisor Slide: Wirehouses’ Waning Headcounts

    Only Merrill Lynch has added net advisors over the past five years -- and breakaways are not the reason.

  • UBS Loses China Bond Deal After Economist's Pig Remark
    Bloomberg29 days ago

    UBS Loses China Bond Deal After Economist's Pig Remark

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.One of China’s biggest state-owned infrastructure companies excluded UBS Group AG from a bond deal after the bank’s global chief economist sparked a furor with his use of the phrase “Chinese pig.”The decision by China Railway Construction Corp. marked the first known case of a corporate issuer distancing itself from UBS over last week’s comment by economist Paul Donovan. His quip on the swine flu epidemic led to a public uproar in China even as some on Wall Street said the reaction was overblown.While lost fees from the deal will have a negligible impact on UBS’s bottom line, the signaling effect from a major state-owned company is potentially worrisome for the Swiss firm as it tries to prevent the drama from damaging its investment-banking and wealth-management businesses.The stakes are high for UBS, which has had a presence in China longer than many of its peers and was the first foreign business to win approval for a majority shareholding in a local securities venture under relaxed ownership rules. Most wealth managers still serve China’s rich from offshore centers such as Hong Kong and Singapore, but the nation’s massive pool of onshore money, estimated at around $20 trillion, is a huge prize for the industry.UBS declined to comment on the CRCC deal.Donovan made the “Chinese pig” comment on Wednesday as he attempted to explain why the country’s swine flu outbreak shouldn’t concern investors eyeing the international inflation outlook.“Does this matter? It matters if you are a Chinese pig,” Donovan said. “It matters if you like eating pork in China. It does not really matter to the rest of the world. China does not export a lot of food. The only global relevance would be if Chinese inflation influenced politics and other policies.”Even as many English speakers viewed the phrasing as innocuous, it set off a firestorm on Chinese social media. The comment was condemned by two Communist Party publications and by trade groups representing Chinese brokerages. Haitong International Securities Group, which competes against UBS for China-related business, said on Friday that it had suspended its activities with the bank.CRCC decided against hiring UBS as a joint global coordinator on a dollar-bond sale, a spokesman for the Beijing-based company said on Monday. The decision was prompted by the pig comment, people familiar with the matter said. CRCC gave the mandate to banks including Citigroup Inc., HSBC Holdings Plc and ICBC International.Donovan apologized for his remark last week, saying in an interview with Bloomberg Television that he unwittingly used culturally insensitive language. UBS later placed the 47-year-old economist on leave and said it was evaluating whether more steps needed to be taken.“We apologize unreservedly for any misunderstanding caused by these innocently intended comments,” UBS said in an emailed statement. “We have removed the audio comment from circulation. To be clear, this comment was about inflation and Chinese consumer prices rising, which was driven by higher prices for pork.”UBS shares fell almost 1% last week, outpacing losses among European peers and extending declines over the past year to 24%. The stock rose 1% at 10:46 a.m. London time on Monday.(Updates UBS shares in final paragraph.)\--With assistance from Yan Zhang.To contact the reporter on this story: Cathy Chan in Hong Kong at kchan14@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Philip Lagerkranser at lagerkranser@bloomberg.net, Michael Patterson, Jeanette RodriguesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • UBS loses role in bond deal for Chinese firm on outcry over pig comment
    Reuters29 days ago

    UBS loses role in bond deal for Chinese firm on outcry over pig comment

    UBS has lost a lead role on a U.S. dollar bond deal for state-backed China Railway Construction Corp, just days after a Chinese outcry over a senior UBS economist's use of "pig" in connection with Chinese food price inflation. While UBS apologized for the remark on Thursday and put the analyst on leave on Friday, the furor led Haitong International Securities, a leading Chinese brokerage, to suspend all business with the Swiss group as some Chinese bankers and analysts criticized the bank for a lack of cultural awareness. On Monday, a spokesman at Chinese infrastructure giant CRCC confirmed it had dropped the Swiss banking giant from the deal, but did not give a reason.

  • UBS puts economist on leave in growing China pig row
    Reuterslast month

    UBS puts economist on leave in growing China pig row

    BEIJING/SHANGHAI/ZURICH (Reuters) - UBS has put on leave a senior economist whose comments about pigs in China caused an outcry and prompted one Chinese firm to suspend all business with Switzerland's largest bank. UBS apologised on Thursday for any misunderstanding caused by Paul Donovan's comments, which it said were about inflation and a rise in Chinese consumer prices due to higher pork prices. Donovan's comments, perceived by some as a racist slur, had further ramifications when Haitong International Securities, the Hong Kong unit of Chinese brokerage Haitong Securities Co, said it has suspended all collaboration with UBS.

  • UBS top economist put on leave after “Chinese pigs” comment provokes outcry
    MarketWatchlast month

    UBS top economist put on leave after “Chinese pigs” comment provokes outcry

    A top analyst at UBS took a leave of absence after his inclusion of the phrase “Chinese pigs” in research commentary this week.

  • Hong Kong protests may hit luxury brands like Burberry and Hermes
    Yahoo Finance UKlast month

    Hong Kong protests may hit luxury brands like Burberry and Hermes

    UBS warns investors to watch out for risks associated with the potential continuation of the riots.

  • Morgan Stanley Seeks Authority for Majority Stake in China JV
    Zackslast month

    Morgan Stanley Seeks Authority for Majority Stake in China JV

    Morgan Stanley (MS) wants to obtain majority stake in one of its two joint ventures in China.

  • Credit Suisse, UBS have boosted capital positions: SNB
    Reuterslast month

    Credit Suisse, UBS have boosted capital positions: SNB

    Switzerland's biggest banks, UBS and Credit Suisse, have improved their capital positions but must strengthen their crisis planning, the Swiss National Bank said on Thursday, citing conclusions of financial watchdog FINMA. "The Swiss big banks Credit Suisse and UBS have slightly improved their capital situation overall, in spite of the moderate deterioration in economic and financial conditions", the central bank said in its 2019 financial stability report. UBS and Credit Suisse have until the end of 2019 to prepare so-called resolution plans that would prevent taxpayers from having to bail them out in the event of a crisis.

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