UNA.AS - Unilever N.V.

Amsterdam - Amsterdam Delayed price. Currency in EUR
42.60
-0.63 (-1.46%)
At close: 5:39PM CET
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close43.24
Open42.42
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range41.64 - 42.83
52-week range38.42 - 57.77
Volume6,486,669
Avg. volume5,771,969
Market cap100.402B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.44
PE ratio (TTM)19.91
EPS (TTM)2.14
Earnings date30 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield1.64 (3.80%)
Ex-dividend date20 Feb 2020
1y target est51.42
  • 3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy for my ISA in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy for my ISA in this market crash

    These three FTSE 100 dividend stocks have smashed the market over the last 10 years. Roland Head thinks they could be perfect for a Stocks and Shares ISA.The post 3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I'd buy for my ISA in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Bloomberg

    Why Disease and Xenophobia Go Hand in Hand

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Pandemics have always been fellow travelers of globalization. A third phenomenon stalks in their shadow: racism.That's worrying. The global threat of Covid-19 seems to be leading not to a unified global response, but to an American president who until Tuesday was describing it as a “Chinese virus” while officials in Beijing stirred up conspiracy theories on social media about a U.S. military origin for the disease. Already, stories are proliferating of people subject to abuse and attacks for “coughing while Asian,” or being turned away from businesses because of actual or presumed Chinese ethnicity.Sadly, there’s nothing new in this. As my colleague Pankaj Mishra has written, the current situation parallels events a century ago, when the first interconnected world economy unraveled into the chaos of World War I. It was disease, as much as war and revolution, that drove that collapse.The age of sail had imposed a natural restraint on both epidemics and migration. It took as long as a month to cross the Atlantic, meaning any infections had already burned themselves out by the time a port was reached. When typhus spread to North America among Irish emigrants fleeing the potato famine of the 1840s under sail, the onboard outbreaks were so notorious that the boats were nicknamed “coffin ships.”Steamships changed all that, opening up ocean transport by drastically lowering its cost and cutting the time needed for transatlantic crossings to less than a week. That helped spark the first era of mass migration as millions of Europeans left for the new world — but it also put the length of a transatlantic journey well within the period when diseases could spread unnoticed.Cholera, which had previously been confined to an endemic area around Bengal, spread among the officers and traders of the British Empire to inflict devastating epidemics on every continent. Smallpox pandemics played a crucial role in the Americas since Columbus’s day, enabling colonialism due to their devastating impacts on indigenous populations. Yellow fever crept up repeatedly from the Caribbean and central America to ravage the southern U.S. In 1889, the first modern influenza pandemic spread rapidly from Russia to North America.Since that era, immigration restrictions and public health measures have often gone hand-in-hand. It’s no coincidence that sites in New York Harbor synonymous with migration such as Ellis Island and Liberty Island started life as quarantine stations. “International mobility is central to the globalization of infectious and chronic diseases,” according to a 2007 bulletin from the World Health Organization. “The history of health and foreign policy reflects long-term links to migration issues.” As people confined to their homes will be well aware, limits on human movement and interaction are crucial to holding back outbreaks of disease. Racism, however, exploits a flaw in human reasoning quite as effectively as infections exploit flaws in our immune defenses. The central fallacy is to assume that if international travel helps spread disease, a perceived “foreign” group is most likely to be carriers. Viruses, though — unlike people — don’t much discriminate by race.(2)The Covid-19 outbreak in Italy is a case in point. Several commentators have claimed without evidence that the source across the north of the country was the large number of Chinese migrants working in Italy’s fashion sector. In fact, tracing the contacts of the infected and finding “patient zero” is a well-established practice in epidemics, and there’s no sign of any significant origins among garment workers. All the research to date suggests the key source was instead a 38-year-old Unilever Plc employee named Mattia from the town of Codogno.Despite the lack of evidence that ethnic groups are responsible for disease, the canard has been frequently been used to justify racist measures. One notorious 19th-century cartoon from Australia’s Bulletin magazine presented China as a malignant octopus attacking the country, two of whose arms were labeled “smallpox” and “typhoid.”It was a similar story in the U.S. Only about 1% of the mostly European immigrants coming to Ellis Island around the turn of the 20th century were rejected for medical reasons. By contrast, some 17% of the more Asian migrant population at San Francisco’s Angel Island was disbarred for sickness, owing in large part to more intrusive screening and vague disease categories applied to non-Europeans. Anti-Chinese measures like San Francisco’s Cubic Air Ordinance were justified on public health grounds as measures to combat “insanitary” overcrowding. For much of the past century, the relative absence of pandemics has put the alliance between racism and disease into remission. Vaccines, antibiotics, sewerage systems and a better understanding of hygiene have proved our most powerful tools for fighting disease. One of the more enduring threats of coronavirus may be the way it changes this calculus. With luck, the connections built up during this era of mass migration will keep xenophobia in check. Trump said Tuesday he would stop using the term “Chinese virus.” That’s a start. (1) Some diseases do appear to be prevalent at different rates among different ethnic groups, such as hepatitis C, although the mechanism for this isn't well understood. Many people with African ancestry are less likely to die from the malaria amoeba thanks to a side-effect of sickle-cell anemia, a blood condition.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Volatility 101: Should Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Shares Have Dropped 16%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Volatility 101: Should Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Shares Have Dropped 16%?

    Most people feel a little frustrated if a stock they own goes down in price. But sometimes broader market conditions...

  • Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks could offer impressive dividend prospects. in my view.The post Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Business Wire

    Unilever ‘United for America’ Initiative Helps Protect Lives and Livelihoods From the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Unilever United States today announced its ‘United for America’ initiative, a wide-ranging set of measures to support the American people during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

  • Spain Sells $11 Billion of Debt, No Problem at All
    Bloomberg

    Spain Sells $11 Billion of Debt, No Problem at All

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nothing says funding is not a problem during this crisis than a 10 billion-euro ($11 billion) debt issue. Spain, in a state of emergency because of the coronavirus, achieved this on Tuesday with a seven-year bond sale that attracted more than 36 billion euros of orders.The country was one of 11 high-grade borrowers testing the waters in what was the busiest day of the month for bond sales and the fourth-busiest of the year. This week’s volumes have already surpassed the total of the first three weeks of March, when the outbreak really suppressed supply. Wednesday is set to be even bigger.Raising such a jumbo deal did mean Spain had to offer a yield that was 18 basis points higher than an existing, slightly shorter seven-year bond. Its last syndicated issue, earlier this year, came with a lower yield than its existing debt. However, the world has changed profoundly and issuers have to be prepared to dangle a carrot to entice investor demand. In the circumstances, this wasn’t much of a premium for investors.A similar phenomenon was also evident for the European Investment Bank, whose three-year bond deal came at an 11 basis-point premium to its existing equivalent. Likewise, premiums were in evidence Monday for new deals from the German States of Bavaria and Saxony-Anhalt. Though, again, they weren’t huge, which shows how desperate investors are to find somewhere to put their money.Corporate deals are making a comeback too: Unilever NV and Engie SA last week followed the trend for higher yields. Company issuance has seen the biggest decline in the bond market this year, unsurprisingly give the business shutdowns, running nearly 20% behind last year's pace. Coca Cola European Partners, Sanofi and Nestle SA all came to the market with multi-tranche issues on Tuesday, illustrating the improvement in conditions. Heineken NV, Danaher Corp. and Carrefour SA were doing benchmark euro deals on Wednesday.The European Central Bank can breathe a bit easier as its 1 trillion euros of quantitative easing planned for the rest of this year is starting to take effect. As there will be considerable emphasis on its corporate sector purchasing program, many of the new investment grade deals should benefit from being scooped up by the ECB, if they’re from Europe-based issuing entities.Wednesday has also seen the return of major banks with Lloyds Banking Group Plc, HSBC Holdings Plc, and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. all bringing euro deals. Credit spreads (the yield on corporate debt relative to sovereign benchmarks) have ballooned since late February, offering better returns for investors than government bonds if they have cash to put to work. Those spreads will start to narrow, but the virus has created a new paradigm, whereby a decent new-issue premium is essential to a successful deal. Normality is returning to European debt capital markets, but the heady days of super-tight credit spreads and incredibly low non-core government bond yields look to be over.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks!
    Fool.co.uk

    In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks!

    In the past three months, the FTSE 100 has fallen by 30% Here's what I would do now.The post In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market
    Fool.co.uk

    I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market

    In the current bear market, these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) stocks are holding up remarkably well. The post I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    FTSE 100 gains on weaker pound, jump in BAT shares

    The FTSE 100 edged higher in a choppy start on Thursday, supported by a jump in the shares of tobacco company BAT and a weaker pound as London braced for a virtual shutdown due to the spread of the novel coronavirus. The internationally focussed FTSE 100 rose 0.7% by 0827 GMT, as exporters benefitted from a plunge in sterling to its lowest level since March 1985. British American Tobacco climbed 3.7% after it said the outbreak has not had any material impact, while shares of other blue-chip companies including Diageo, BP and Unilever rose more than 3%.

  • I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus
    Fool.co.uk

    I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus

    Royston Wild owns this particular blue-chip. He thinks it's a brilliant buy for FTSE 100 investors following recent price falls. The post I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today
    Fool.co.uk

    These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares offer good value for money in my opinion.The post These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash

    Long-term investors like Warren Buffett should consider these FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) dividend stocks, says Roland Head.The post 3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Is the Unilever share price expensive at 4072p?
    Stockopedia

    Is the Unilever share price expensive at 4072p?

    Unilever (LON:ULVR) is a large cap stock in the Personal Products industry whose brands Axe, Dirt is Good (Omo), Dove, Hellmann's, Knorr, Lipton, Lux, Magnum,8230;

  • 2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now
    Fool.co.uk

    2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now

    My guess is that when the COVID-19 coronavirus fades from our collective consciousness, these two stocks will be making new highs.The post 2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Business Wire

    Unilever N.V. and Unilever PLC Announced That Each Filed Today, March 9, 2020, its Annual Report on Form 20-F

    Unilever N.V. and Unilever PLC announced that each filed today, March 9, 2020, its Annual Report on Form 20-F, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. A copy of this Annual Report on Form 20-F is available to download on its website at http://www.unilever.com/investorrelations or www.unilever.com. Copies of the Annual Report on Form 20-F are available, free of charge, upon request to Unilever PLC, Investor Relations Department, 100 Victoria Embankment, London EC4Y 0DY, United Kingdom.

  • Unilever’s share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy?
    Fool.co.uk

    Unilever’s share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy?

    Rachael FitzGerald-Finch discusses why she thinks you should consider buying Unilever right now. The post Unilever's share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things!
    Fool.co.uk

    If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things!

    With the news that the FTSE 100 has been falling, should I sell up or should I buy? There's one stock I particularly like.The post If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks!
    Fool.co.uk

    In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks!

    These FTSE 100 stocks are on my watch list for March, should the market crash make their share prices slide further.The post In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started
    Fool.co.uk

    This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started

    For those just starting to save for retirement, stocks and shares are cheaper now, and there is a long road ahead for recovery.The post This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Forget Euromillions! I think these FTSE 100 stocks are a better bet
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget Euromillions! I think these FTSE 100 stocks are a better bet

    In a bear market, I favour investing in companies selling consumable products, just like these FTSE 100 stocks.The post Forget Euromillions! I think these FTSE 100 stocks are a better bet appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy in this market crash

    G A Chester highlights two top-quality FTSE 100 businesses whose shares are trading at double-digit discounts to their previous highs.The post 2 FTSE 100 stocks I'd buy in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reckitt Benckiser Cries Over $6.5 Billion of Spilled Milk
    Bloomberg

    Reckitt Benckiser Cries Over $6.5 Billion of Spilled Milk

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When Laxman Narasimhan cut the full-year outlook for Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc in October, the company’s new chief executive officer threw in everything but the kitchen sink.On Thursday, he completed his demolition job of expectations at the maker of everything from Durex condoms to Dettol disinfectant, saying the operating margin would be much lower in the future and announcing a 5 billion-pound ($6.5 billion) writedown to the value of the Mead Johnson baby-formula business, which Reckitt bought just three years ago for $17 billion.Easing back on Reckitt’s margin expectations was essential, as it gives it the space to make some much-need investments to boost sales. Even in 2019, when its results were hurt by a poor flu season and the continued underperformance of Mead’s infant nutrition products, its operating margin was 26.2%, well ahead of Unilever’s 19.1% and Nestle’s 17.6%.Reckitt aims to invest about 2 billion pounds over the next three years to try to deliver mid-single digit organic revenue growth. It rose by just 0.8% in 2019. Part of this will be funded by 1.3 billion pounds of cost savings. But there will also be a hit to the margin of 3.5 percentage points this year, much bigger than the market had expected.Relaxing the margin also leaves room to change Reckitt’s hard-driving culture, which has historically obsessed about controlling costs and short-term earnings. Martin Deboo, an analyst at Jefferies, anticipates an operating margin of 22.7% in 2020. The company wants to return to a margin percentage in the mid-20s eventually.The new CEO has also signaled portfolio change. He has ditched a plan to split Reckitt into its hygiene and home business —  owner of brands such as the Cillit Bang cleaner and Vanish stain remover — and its health arm, which owns Nurofen painkillers and Scholl foot products. Reckitt will now remain as a single company, but with three divisions: hygiene; health and nutrition.This structure, together with the whopper writedown, suggests that the nutrition business — primarily Mead Johnson — might be for sale at the right price. That is wise, given the poor performance of baby milk since Reckitt acquired Mead. The foray into formula under former CEO Rakesh Kapoor looks like a colossal waste of money. Reckitt also missed out on buying Pfizer’s consumer health unit, a far better fit, because it was busy digesting Mead Johnson and needed to cut debt.Narasimham says Reckitt’s problems are operational. Still, fixing them won’t be straightforward, particularly with any coronavirus related disruption to consumption and supply chains. Given the economic context, the new growth and operating margin targets look a stretch.Also, an activist investor might be tempted to push for a breakup if his strategy doesn’t work, particularly if the shares, which fell about 5% on Thursday, decline further. The now abandoned plan to split the hygiene and home division from the health unit might have delivered value.If Narasimham doesn’t clean up at Reckitt, a hedge fund may try to do the job for him.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Forget buy-to-let! I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget buy-to-let! I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could offer long-term growth potential, in my opinion.The post Forget buy-to-let! I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Dan Loeb’s $48 Billion Target Has SomeTesty Investors
    Bloomberg

    Dan Loeb’s $48 Billion Target Has SomeTesty Investors

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Dan Loeb’s Third Point LLC says it has a history of working constructively with boards to promote the success of their companies. The activist’s latest goal seems to involve removing the board of Prudential Plc entirely, and dismantling the head office around it, as part of a breakup of the $48 billion insurer.That may not be as hard as it sounds.Once focused on Britain, Prudential has transformed into a large Asian insurer with a smaller U.S. business attached. Its shares suffer under a stark valuation discount to Hong Kong-listed peer AIA Group Ltd., and Loeb has set out a plausible explanation for why. The reason, he says, is that the Asian side needs capital to grow, but competes with shareholders for dividends. Likewise, the U.S. business would be better off conserving cash in support of its own capital strength. Meanwhile, most investors don’t want to invest in an Asian-U.S. hybrid insurer.The remedy sounds simple: Split Prudential into separate U.S. and Asian businesses with their own stock listings and dividend policies. The Asian shares would probably command a much higher valuation than whole the group does now,  providing an acquisition currency that would be a cheap source of growth capital. At the same time, scrapping the conglomerate structure would eliminate the need for a costly corporate center based in London.None of this is likely to be a huge surprise to Prudential’s directors. The board has already been simplifying the company, mainly by spinning off  the M&G Plc asset management business. That move has failed to address the valuation gap, so the next logical step would be to jettison the U.S. subsidiary and become a pure Asia play. Prudential’s chairman, Paul Manduca, is retiring next year anyway, and Chief Executive Officer Mike Wells has been in the role for five years. Manduca’s successor, banker and former government minister Shriti Vadera, has a chance to be radical.The real opponents to Loeb’s ideas are more likely to be found among Prudential’s long-term investors. Third Point is a new arrival taking on a longstanding problem. But Prudential has a large number of U.K. investors whose own narrow interests may be served by keeping it in its current form, paying high dividends via a London-listed share. Recall that consumer giant Unilever NV encountered huge resistance to an attempt to simplify its structure in 2018, while plumbing group Ferguson Plc is moving with extreme care about a possible re-domicile for the same reason.Loeb argues Prudential in two pieces would be worth twice what it is today. He may be right, but if a breakup involves a dividend cut along the way, it won’t be plain sailing.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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