UNA.AS - Unilever N.V.

Amsterdam - Amsterdam Delayed price. Currency in EUR
54.60
-0.25 (-0.46%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close54.85
Open55.00
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range54.43 - 55.00
52-week range45.12 - 55.33
Volume2,743,501
Avg. volume3,156,010
Market cap142.485B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.44
PE ratio (TTM)15.69
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield1.64 (3.69%)
Ex-dividend date20 Feb 2020
1y target estN/A
  • 3 FTSE 100 growth stocks I’d buy as the global economy crashes
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 growth stocks I’d buy as the global economy crashes

    Looking for lifeboats as economic conditions worsen? These FTSE 100 heroes could be just what you're seeking, says Royston Wild.The post 3 FTSE 100 growth stocks I’d buy as the global economy crashes appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 2 FTSE 100 shares I’d buy in the stock market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 shares I’d buy in the stock market crash

    The coronavirus stock market crash has thrown up some bargains in the FTSE 100. Here are two that are a solid buy for me.The post 2 FTSE 100 shares I’d buy in the stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Unilever: a high-quality investment?
    Stockopedia

    Unilever: a high-quality investment?

    High-quality companies outperform junk companies in the stock market. From Robert Novy-Marx to Joseph Piotroski, the world’s foremost investment academics have8230;

  • Bloomberg

    No Touching, No Actors as Advertisers Confront Life in Isolation

    (Bloomberg) -- Shaking hands has a publicity problem -- so does walking through crowds, attending a concert and passing out high fives.Scenes like these are disappearing from advertisements as companies come to grips with public health orders to self isolate and limit the spread of the novel coronavirus pandemic. Ads that were in the works have been shelved and campaigns have to be reworked on a short timeline. Travel and hospitality companies have gone quiet. Meanwhile, with so much of the world on lockdown, it’s not exactly easy to shoot new commercials.“You have to ask what meaning does your commercial have right now, given that everything has changed in the immediate realities of life,” said Mark Lund, chief executive officer of McCann Worldgroup U.K. “How do you avoid that tone deafness which might offend and alienate people?”The U.K. advertising regulator said it got 163 complaints about a KFC television ad in March which featured people licking their fingers. Complaints said it was irresponsibly encouraging unsanitary behavior, according to a spokesperson for the Advertising Standards Authority. When the agency contacted the fried-chicken fast food chain, whose longtime slogan is “Finger lickin’ good,” the company had already decided to pull the ads.Unilever Plc suspended its “Unstoppable” campaign for Domestos, including a video ad that said the toilet cleaner kills germs that are “hiding, breeding, infecting the weak.”Getting InventiveIn addition to new sensitivities around hygiene, advertisers are having to cope with limited resources to make new commercials as production crews and actors self-isolate.“World War II comes to advertising land. What can you make out of this empty washing-up-liquid bottle and a bit of sticky-back plastic?” said Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer of Digitas Inc.’s U.K. business. “It’s about being inventive.”A cookie brand that Digitas works with had to pivot quickly from a campaign about going out to one about staying in and staying safe, she said. Agencies are getting creative with footage that’s already been shot, and they’re looking at user-generated content and social-media influencers, though the quality can be hit-and-miss, Fosse said.Lund said that McCann has done an ad for grocery store Aldi using existing footage and resurrecting an animated carrot from its Christmas campaign telling shoppers to “go easy” on the vegetables.As the lockdown drags on, advertisers will also have to make the decision about whether to make a bigger pivot on campaigns, such as commissioning more animation and using computer-generated imagery that can be produced by teams of graphic designers, art directors and 3D modelers working from home.“The likelihood is things will take a bit longer, but there is no creative compromise,” said Mark Benson, CEO of global creative ad studio Moving Picture Company. Brands are coming to the studio to complete ads that were already in production with special effects, he said. “For example, an auto spot where the car would have normally been shot by a specialist auto director -- it still can be, but the car will be built by animators in computer graphics instead of shot live-action on location.”New TechnologyAnimation and visual effects studios were already changing the way they work so teams can collaborate remotely, and shifting computing horsepower from office servers to the cloud. The shock of the coronavirus will hasten the move to new video production methods, said Neil Hatton, CEO of film and TV industry lobby group the UK Screen Alliance.“There are parallels with the Japanese tsunami, which accelerated a move from production delivered on tape to production on computer file as the tsunami wiped out the tape-manufacturing companies on the coast of Japan,” said Hatton.For an industry that prides itself on creativity, ingenuity is more important than ever. Advertisers may be facing a worse setback than the 10% retraction in marketing spending that followed the 2009 financial crisis, Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Matthew Bloxham said. Ads typically cost companies the equivalent of about 11% or 12% of sales and are easy to reduce. The slump is going to spread quickly from the travel and leisure industry clients, who cut their spending immediately, to luxury goods, cars and clothes, he said.Read more: TV Industry Faces Billions in Lost Ads During Sports Hiatus“We know that it’s going to be quite a sharp kind of effect -- the question is how long that effect goes on for,” McCann’s Lund said. “We’re having conversations with our clients about what does the world look like on the other side and what does it mean for brands and how they exist in people’s lives.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Watch out for the post-Covid-19 reset. I think Unilever will come out well
    Fool.co.uk

    Watch out for the post-Covid-19 reset. I think Unilever will come out well

    In the post-Covid-19 world, many companies will go bust. I think Unilever is an example of a company that will flourish.The post Watch out for the post-Covid-19 reset. I think Unilever will come out well appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Some of the UK's biggest firms are pooling resources to build NHS ventilators
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Some of the UK's biggest firms are pooling resources to build NHS ventilators

    UK government has ordered 10,000 ventilators from industrial consortium including Airbus, Bae Systems, Meggit, Ford and Rolls-Royce.

  • 3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy for my ISA in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy for my ISA in this market crash

    These three FTSE 100 dividend stocks have smashed the market over the last 10 years. Roland Head thinks they could be perfect for a Stocks and Shares ISA.The post 3 quality FTSE 100 stocks I'd buy for my ISA in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Bloomberg

    Why Disease and Xenophobia Go Hand in Hand

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Pandemics have always been fellow travelers of globalization. A third phenomenon stalks in their shadow: racism.That's worrying. The global threat of Covid-19 seems to be leading not to a unified global response, but to an American president who until Tuesday was describing it as a “Chinese virus” while officials in Beijing stirred up conspiracy theories on social media about a U.S. military origin for the disease. Already, stories are proliferating of people subject to abuse and attacks for “coughing while Asian,” or being turned away from businesses because of actual or presumed Chinese ethnicity.Sadly, there’s nothing new in this. As my colleague Pankaj Mishra has written, the current situation parallels events a century ago, when the first interconnected world economy unraveled into the chaos of World War I. It was disease, as much as war and revolution, that drove that collapse.The age of sail had imposed a natural restraint on both epidemics and migration. It took as long as a month to cross the Atlantic, meaning any infections had already burned themselves out by the time a port was reached. When typhus spread to North America among Irish emigrants fleeing the potato famine of the 1840s under sail, the onboard outbreaks were so notorious that the boats were nicknamed “coffin ships.”Steamships changed all that, opening up ocean transport by drastically lowering its cost and cutting the time needed for transatlantic crossings to less than a week. That helped spark the first era of mass migration as millions of Europeans left for the new world — but it also put the length of a transatlantic journey well within the period when diseases could spread unnoticed.Cholera, which had previously been confined to an endemic area around Bengal, spread among the officers and traders of the British Empire to inflict devastating epidemics on every continent. Smallpox pandemics played a crucial role in the Americas since Columbus’s day, enabling colonialism due to their devastating impacts on indigenous populations. Yellow fever crept up repeatedly from the Caribbean and central America to ravage the southern U.S. In 1889, the first modern influenza pandemic spread rapidly from Russia to North America.Since that era, immigration restrictions and public health measures have often gone hand-in-hand. It’s no coincidence that sites in New York Harbor synonymous with migration such as Ellis Island and Liberty Island started life as quarantine stations. “International mobility is central to the globalization of infectious and chronic diseases,” according to a 2007 bulletin from the World Health Organization. “The history of health and foreign policy reflects long-term links to migration issues.” As people confined to their homes will be well aware, limits on human movement and interaction are crucial to holding back outbreaks of disease. Racism, however, exploits a flaw in human reasoning quite as effectively as infections exploit flaws in our immune defenses. The central fallacy is to assume that if international travel helps spread disease, a perceived “foreign” group is most likely to be carriers. Viruses, though — unlike people — don’t much discriminate by race.(2)The Covid-19 outbreak in Italy is a case in point. Several commentators have claimed without evidence that the source across the north of the country was the large number of Chinese migrants working in Italy’s fashion sector. In fact, tracing the contacts of the infected and finding “patient zero” is a well-established practice in epidemics, and there’s no sign of any significant origins among garment workers. All the research to date suggests the key source was instead a 38-year-old Unilever Plc employee named Mattia from the town of Codogno.Despite the lack of evidence that ethnic groups are responsible for disease, the canard has been frequently been used to justify racist measures. One notorious 19th-century cartoon from Australia’s Bulletin magazine presented China as a malignant octopus attacking the country, two of whose arms were labeled “smallpox” and “typhoid.”It was a similar story in the U.S. Only about 1% of the mostly European immigrants coming to Ellis Island around the turn of the 20th century were rejected for medical reasons. By contrast, some 17% of the more Asian migrant population at San Francisco’s Angel Island was disbarred for sickness, owing in large part to more intrusive screening and vague disease categories applied to non-Europeans. Anti-Chinese measures like San Francisco’s Cubic Air Ordinance were justified on public health grounds as measures to combat “insanitary” overcrowding. For much of the past century, the relative absence of pandemics has put the alliance between racism and disease into remission. Vaccines, antibiotics, sewerage systems and a better understanding of hygiene have proved our most powerful tools for fighting disease. One of the more enduring threats of coronavirus may be the way it changes this calculus. With luck, the connections built up during this era of mass migration will keep xenophobia in check. Trump said Tuesday he would stop using the term “Chinese virus.” That’s a start. (1) Some diseases do appear to be prevalent at different rates among different ethnic groups, such as hepatitis C, although the mechanism for this isn't well understood. Many people with African ancestry are less likely to die from the malaria amoeba thanks to a side-effect of sickle-cell anemia, a blood condition.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Volatility 101: Should Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Shares Have Dropped 16%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Volatility 101: Should Unilever Group (AMS:UNA) Shares Have Dropped 16%?

    Most people feel a little frustrated if a stock they own goes down in price. But sometimes broader market conditions...

  • Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks could offer impressive dividend prospects. in my view.The post Why I’d buy these 2 cheap FTSE 100 dividend shares in an ISA after the stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Spain Sells $11 Billion of Debt, No Problem at All
    Bloomberg

    Spain Sells $11 Billion of Debt, No Problem at All

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nothing says funding is not a problem during this crisis than a 10 billion-euro ($11 billion) debt issue. Spain, in a state of emergency because of the coronavirus, achieved this on Tuesday with a seven-year bond sale that attracted more than 36 billion euros of orders.The country was one of 11 high-grade borrowers testing the waters in what was the busiest day of the month for bond sales and the fourth-busiest of the year. This week’s volumes have already surpassed the total of the first three weeks of March, when the outbreak really suppressed supply. Wednesday is set to be even bigger.Raising such a jumbo deal did mean Spain had to offer a yield that was 18 basis points higher than an existing, slightly shorter seven-year bond. Its last syndicated issue, earlier this year, came with a lower yield than its existing debt. However, the world has changed profoundly and issuers have to be prepared to dangle a carrot to entice investor demand. In the circumstances, this wasn’t much of a premium for investors.A similar phenomenon was also evident for the European Investment Bank, whose three-year bond deal came at an 11 basis-point premium to its existing equivalent. Likewise, premiums were in evidence Monday for new deals from the German States of Bavaria and Saxony-Anhalt. Though, again, they weren’t huge, which shows how desperate investors are to find somewhere to put their money.Corporate deals are making a comeback too: Unilever NV and Engie SA last week followed the trend for higher yields. Company issuance has seen the biggest decline in the bond market this year, unsurprisingly give the business shutdowns, running nearly 20% behind last year's pace. Coca Cola European Partners, Sanofi and Nestle SA all came to the market with multi-tranche issues on Tuesday, illustrating the improvement in conditions. Heineken NV, Danaher Corp. and Carrefour SA were doing benchmark euro deals on Wednesday.The European Central Bank can breathe a bit easier as its 1 trillion euros of quantitative easing planned for the rest of this year is starting to take effect. As there will be considerable emphasis on its corporate sector purchasing program, many of the new investment grade deals should benefit from being scooped up by the ECB, if they’re from Europe-based issuing entities.Wednesday has also seen the return of major banks with Lloyds Banking Group Plc, HSBC Holdings Plc, and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. all bringing euro deals. Credit spreads (the yield on corporate debt relative to sovereign benchmarks) have ballooned since late February, offering better returns for investors than government bonds if they have cash to put to work. Those spreads will start to narrow, but the virus has created a new paradigm, whereby a decent new-issue premium is essential to a successful deal. Normality is returning to European debt capital markets, but the heady days of super-tight credit spreads and incredibly low non-core government bond yields look to be over.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks!
    Fool.co.uk

    In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks!

    In the past three months, the FTSE 100 has fallen by 30% Here's what I would do now.The post In the market crash, I’d consider investing in these FTSE 100 stocks! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market
    Fool.co.uk

    I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market

    In the current bear market, these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) stocks are holding up remarkably well. The post I expect these FTSE 100 stocks to outperform in this bear market appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    FTSE 100 gains on weaker pound, jump in BAT shares

    The FTSE 100 edged higher in a choppy start on Thursday, supported by a jump in the shares of tobacco company BAT and a weaker pound as London braced for a virtual shutdown due to the spread of the novel coronavirus. The internationally focussed FTSE 100 rose 0.7% by 0827 GMT, as exporters benefitted from a plunge in sterling to its lowest level since March 1985. British American Tobacco climbed 3.7% after it said the outbreak has not had any material impact, while shares of other blue-chip companies including Diageo, BP and Unilever rose more than 3%.

  • I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus
    Fool.co.uk

    I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus

    Royston Wild owns this particular blue-chip. He thinks it's a brilliant buy for FTSE 100 investors following recent price falls. The post I think this FTSE 100 growth stock can keep growing earnings despite the coronavirus appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today
    Fool.co.uk

    These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares offer good value for money in my opinion.The post These 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks are in free-fall. Here’s why I’d buy them in an ISA today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash

    Long-term investors like Warren Buffett should consider these FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) dividend stocks, says Roland Head.The post 3 FTSE 100 stocks I think Warren Buffett would buy in this market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • 2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now
    Fool.co.uk

    2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now

    My guess is that when the COVID-19 coronavirus fades from our collective consciousness, these two stocks will be making new highs.The post 2 high-quality FTSE 100 shares I’d buy right now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Unilever’s share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy?
    Fool.co.uk

    Unilever’s share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy?

    Rachael FitzGerald-Finch discusses why she thinks you should consider buying Unilever right now. The post Unilever's share price is RISING despite the bear market. Is it a buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things!
    Fool.co.uk

    If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things!

    With the news that the FTSE 100 has been falling, should I sell up or should I buy? There's one stock I particularly like.The post If the FTSE 100 drops more in March, I’ll look to do these 2 things! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks!
    Fool.co.uk

    In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks!

    These FTSE 100 stocks are on my watch list for March, should the market crash make their share prices slide further.The post In the March bear market, I’ll be watching these FTSE 100 stocks! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started
    Fool.co.uk

    This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started

    For those just starting to save for retirement, stocks and shares are cheaper now, and there is a long road ahead for recovery.The post This market crash might be good for your pension if you are just getting started appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

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