BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
373.18
-1.74 (-0.46%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT
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Previous close374.92
Open374.25
Bid0.00 x 1000
Ask0.00 x 1100
Day's range372.68 - 378.70
52-week range292.47 - 446.01
Volume2,086,194
Avg. volume4,216,092
Market cap209.992B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.27
PE ratio (TTM)42.79
EPS (TTM)8.72
Earnings date23 Oct 2019
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.19%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-08
1y target est411.86
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Boeing (BA) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Boeing (BA) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    Boeing (BA) closed at $373.14 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.47% move from the prior day.

  • Southwest pilots say 737 MAX return may be delayed beyond Boeing's fourth quarter goal
    Reuters

    Southwest pilots say 737 MAX return may be delayed beyond Boeing's fourth quarter goal

    Southwest Airlines pilots predicted on Monday that the grounded Boeing 737 MAX airplane will return to the skies around February, weeks later than Boeing and airlines have projected. Southwest, United Airlines and American Airlines currently estimate the planes will be available to fly in early January. Boeing said Monday it is "working towards return to service in the fourth quarter." A key step - a certification test flight by Boeing - is not expected until early November.

  • Boeing MAX Flights: Airlines Extend Cancellations Again
    Market Realist

    Boeing MAX Flights: Airlines Extend Cancellations Again

    Last week, American Airlines (AAL) and United Airlines (UAL) announced that they would remove all 737 MAX flights from their schedule through early January.

  • Why Boeing 737 MAX May Not Fly Again This Year
    Market Realist

    Why Boeing 737 MAX May Not Fly Again This Year

    On October 11, an international safety panel slammed Boeing and the FAA for the faulty certification process for the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.

  • Investing.com

    Day Ahead: Top 3 Things to Watch

    Investing.com - Here's a preview of the top 3 things that could rock markets tomorrow.

  • PG&E, Boeing, Deere, Sears, Apple: Companies to Watch
    Yahoo Finance

    PG&E, Boeing, Deere, Sears, Apple: Companies to Watch

    PG&E, Boeing, Deere, Sears and Apple are the companies to watch.

  • Boeing CEO Loses Board Position amid 737 MAX Crisis
    Market Realist

    Boeing CEO Loses Board Position amid 737 MAX Crisis

    The Boeing 737 MAX 8 crisis has cost a lot for everyone. Most recently, CEO Dennis Muilenburg lost his job as chair of the company’s board.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Emirates president says he does not expect to take any Boeing 777x in 2020

    Emirates doubts it will receive any of the 115 Boeing 777-9s it has ordered next year, its president said on Monday, as the U.S. planemaker grapples with challenges in building the jet. Emirates, a launch customer of the world's biggest twin engined jet, was to receive its first 777-9 in 2020 but the manufacturer has suspended load testing of the plane. Now it doesn't look like we will have any," Tim Clark said at a conference in Dubai.

  • Emirates president says he does not expect to take any Boeing 777x in 2020
    Reuters

    Emirates president says he does not expect to take any Boeing 777x in 2020

    Emirates doubts it will receive any of the 115 Boeing 777-9s it has ordered next year, its president said on Monday, as the U.S. planemaker grapples with challenges in building the jet. Emirates, a launch customer of the world's biggest twin engined jet, was to receive its first 777-9 in 2020 but the manufacturer has suspended load testing of the plane. Now it doesn't look like we will have any," Tim Clark said at a conference in Dubai.

  • EU Seeks to Halt U.S. Tariffs Over Airbus Aid in Last-Gasp Plea
    Bloomberg

    EU Seeks to Halt U.S. Tariffs Over Airbus Aid in Last-Gasp Plea

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The European Union made a last-ditch appeal to the U.S. to refrain from triggering retaliatory tariffs over illegal subsidies to Airbus SE, warning of economic harm to both sides and repeating a call for a negotiated solution.European Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom told her U.S. counterpart, Robert Lighthizer, that his plan to hit $7.5 billion of EU goods ranging from planes to whiskey with duties would compel the EU to apply countermeasures in a parallel lawsuit over market-distorting aid to Boeing Co. U.S. levies would make a negotiated settlement harder to reach, she said.“I strongly believe that imposing additional tariffs in the two aircraft cases is not a solution,” Malmstrom said in an Oct. 11 letter to Lighthizer seen by Bloomberg News. “It would only inflict damage on businesses and put at risk jobs on both sides of the Atlantic, harm global trade and the broader aviation industry at a sensitive time.”The World Trade Organization is due to give final approval for U.S. retaliation in the Airbus case on Monday, allowing tariffs to kick in as planned on Friday.The trans-Atlantic dispute over aircraft aid risks fraying a trade truce struck between the U.S. and EU in July 2018. At the time, both sides pledged to try to scale back commercial barriers and avoid a repeat of tit-for-tat tariffs that began with President Donald Trump’s duties on European steel and aluminum on U.S. national-security grounds.The WTO cases over subsidies to Airbus and Boeing are 15 years old. Because of the calendar, the U.S. is entitled to strike first and the EU would follow suit sometime in 2020.Malmstrom gave no sign in her letter to Lighthizer that an idea floated in some EU circles for quicker European retaliation is gaining ground. The idea weighed was to hit back by invoking an unrelated, older WTO case against a now-defunct U.S. tax break given to companies, including Boeing, via subsidiaries known as foreign sales corporations.Instead, Malmstrom said the EU’s planned countermeasures of $12 billion would be applied “when the time comes on the parallel Boeing case.”Aside from causing economic harm, hastier European retaliation could undermine the EU’s claim to be working to uphold the WTO system that Trump’s protectionism is shaking.“We are ready to negotiate a settlement for both the Airbus and the Boeing case addressing remaining compliance obligations on both sides, putting these cases behind us,” Malmstrom said.To contact the reporter on this story: Jonathan Stearns in Brussels at jstearns2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Tony Czuczka, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Boeing Strips CEO of Chairman Job as 737 Max Crisis Drags On

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. stripped Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg of his role as chairman, leaving him little margin for error in his final push to resolve the crisis engulfing the company’s 737 Max jetliner.Separating the CEO and chairman roles will let Muilenburg focus on getting the grounded jet back in the air, Boeing said in a statement Friday. While the board expressed its continued support for Muilenburg, it pledged “active oversight” of his performance, a sign of the pressure he’s under to surmount regulatory hurdles and soothe the safety concerns of customers, pilots and passengers.Lead director David Calhoun, a senior executive at Blackstone Group Inc., will take over as non-executive chairman. Calhoun, 62, a former boss of General Electric Co.’s aviation division, stands out on the board for his deep aerospace experience and has been mentioned in years past as a contender for Boeing’s CEO job.“It provides stability and continuity but also introduces a new approach to leadership,” said Richard Aboulafia, an aerospace analyst at Teal Group. “It’s not a huge move in itself, but it creates the potential for a much bigger move.”Muilenburg, 55, is under increasing scrutiny as the global flying ban on the Max nears the seven-month mark, with little clarity on when Boeing’s best-selling jet will return to service. The planemaker’s reputation and finances have been battered since two Max crashes killed 346 people and prompted a worldwide grounding.The shares were little changed after the close of regular trading in New York, having advanced 1.1% to $374.92 in the Friday session. Boeing slumped after the flying ban began in March, but the stock has climbed 17% since mid-August as investors bet that the Max would soon return to service. That’s the biggest gain on the Dow Jones Industrial Average over that period.‘Full Confidence’The board will soon add a director who will serve on a new safety panel, Calhoun said in the statement. The Aerospace Safety Committee is part of a board-ordered safety push.“The board has full confidence in Dennis as CEO,” he said.Muilenburg, 55, said he was “fully supportive” of the change.“Our entire team is laser-focused on returning the 737 Max safely to service and delivering on the full breadth of our company’s commitments,” he said in the statement. He took the reins as CEO in July 2015 and added the chairmanship in March 2016.Governance ActivistsCorporate-governance activists had already been clamoring to separate the chairman and CEO positions.Boeing opposed a proposal to divide the roles at the annual meeting earlier this year, saying directors should be able to select their leadership structure rather than be bound by an “inflexible policy.” Investors rejected the measure but it won 27% support, up from 20% the year before, including abstentions and non-votes.Shareholder activist John Chevedden filed a proposal Oct. 9 to raise the matter again at Boeing’s 2020 annual meeting. Directors would have the discretion to phase in an independent chairman, “although it would be better to have an immediate transition,” the measure said.The Max’s return continues to slip amid scrutiny from sometimes fractious regulators. Until recent weeks, Boeing had insisted the plane would be cleared early in the fourth quarter. But the Max’s three U.S. operators -- Southwest Airlines Co., United Airlines Holdings Inc. and American Airlines Group Inc. -- have taken the single-aisle jet out of their flight schedules until January.A longer delay would jeopardize Muilenburg’s position as CEO, said Aboulafia.“If they’re on course for re-certification in the fourth quarter as they maintain, then he could hang on,” he said. “If it slips much beyond that, then his job is definitely at risk.”Boeing LiferAn aerospace engineer by training and Boeing lifer, the CEO has served as the company’s public face throughout the Max crisis. That’s made him a target of critics who contend that Boeing was too slow to fully explain the role its flight-control software played in the crashes.Muilenburg will have two critical chances to shape perceptions about his handling of the crisis this month: When third-quarter results are released on Oct. 23 and when he testifies before Congress a week later.Directors already should have insights into the financial results, which analysts anticipate to be dented by unexpectedly low deliveries of the 787 Dreamliner and other aircraft.Boeing’s tally of 63 deliveries, down from 190 shipments a year earlier, was 12 jetliners less than predicted by Cowen & Co. analyst Cai von Rumohr.The shortfall probably pared $900 million from third-quarter revenue and 25 cents to 30 cents a share from estimated earnings, von Rumohr said in an Oct. 8 report. That probably resulted in a cash outflow of $1.7 billion to $2 billion for the quarter, he said.‘Undue Pressures’Boeing announced the decision to split the CEO and chairman jobs on the same day that a review panel of global aviation experts delivered a scathing assessment of missteps by the company and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration in the development and certification of the Max.The Chicago-based manufacturer exerted “undue pressures” on some of its own employees who had FAA authority to approve design changes, according to a 69-page summary of the panel’s findings.Regulators assessing the aircraft sometimes didn’t follow their own rules, used out-of-date procedures and lacked the resources and expertise to fully vet the design changes implicated in two fatal crashes, the Joint Authorities Technical Review found.The findings are ratcheting up the pressure on Muilenburg as he seeks to guide Boeing out of one of the biggest crises in the modern jet era.When asked in an interview last week if he was the right person to lead Boeing out of the deepening turmoil, Muilenburg responded: “This is not about me, right? It’s about our company and what we do for our customers.” He then said, “I will serve in this role with everything that I have as long as the board wants me serving in this role.”(Updates with analyst comment in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Richard Clough.To contact the reporter on this story: Julie Johnsson in Chicago at jjohnsson@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Case at bcase4@bloomberg.net, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Boeing board strips CEO of chairman title amid 737 MAX crisis
    Reuters

    Boeing board strips CEO of chairman title amid 737 MAX crisis

    Separating the roles, which will enable Muilenburg to have "maximum focus" on steering daily operations, was the latest step the board has taken in recent weeks to improve executive oversight of its engineering ranks and industrial operations. Lead Director David Calhoun, a senior managing director at Blackstone Group, will takeover as non-executive chairman, Boeing said in its announcement, which came late on Friday afternoon without warning. It added that the board had "full confidence" in Muilenburg, who will retain the top job and remain on the board.

  • FAA must ramp up staffing to oversee airplane certification after 737 MAX - panel
    Reuters

    FAA must ramp up staffing to oversee airplane certification after 737 MAX - panel

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration had insufficient personnel to oversee the certification of new Boeing airplanes and should make significant reforms in how it approves new aircraft, an international aviation panel said Friday. The panel also faulted assumptions made by the airplane manufacturer in designing the 737 MAX and for not disclosing more information to the FAA.

  • Why Southwest Excluded Hawaii from Its Fare Hike
    Market Realist

    Why Southwest Excluded Hawaii from Its Fare Hike

    JPMorgan Chase analyst Jamie Baker revealed on October 10 that Southwest Airlines had excluded Hawaiian flights from the recent fare hike across its network.

  • Boeing, Renault, L Brands, Tilray, Nike: Companies to Watch
    Yahoo Finance

    Boeing, Renault, L Brands, Tilray, Nike: Companies to Watch

    Boeing, Renault, L Brands, Tilray and Nike are the companies to watch.

  • How to know if your next flight is on a Boeing 737 Max
    Yahoo Finance

    How to know if your next flight is on a Boeing 737 Max

    It's easy to see what kind of aircraft any given flight will have. Consumers may start looking for this information when the Boeing 737 Max comes back into service.

  • Raytheon (RTN) Secures Navy Deal to Support F-18 APG-79 AESA
    Zacks

    Raytheon (RTN) Secures Navy Deal to Support F-18 APG-79 AESA

    Raytheon (RTN) to deliver 101 spare part units for supporting the F-18 APG-79 active electronically scanned array radar system.

  • Boeing's (BA) 787 Fleet Hit by Aeroflot's Order Cancellation
    Zacks

    Boeing's (BA) 787 Fleet Hit by Aeroflot's Order Cancellation

    Boeing (BA) currently witnesses a weak demand trend for its large, long-haul 787 and 777 aircraft.

  • United Airlines cancels Boeing 737 MAX flights until January 6
    Reuters

    United Airlines cancels Boeing 737 MAX flights until January 6

    The company said it expects to cancel more than 8,000 flights for October, November, December and the first few days of January and that it will monitor regulatory updates and make adjustments accordingly. Among other U.S. airlines that operate the MAX, Southwest Airlines Co has canceled flights through Jan. 5, while American Airlines Group Inc has extended cancellations of Boeing 737 MAX flights through Jan. 15. The fast-selling 737 MAX has been grounded worldwide since mid-March while Boeing Co updates flight control software at the center of two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that together killed 346 people within a span of five months.

  • United Airlines cancels Boeing 737 MAX flights until Jan. 6
    Reuters

    United Airlines cancels Boeing 737 MAX flights until Jan. 6

    The company said it expects to cancel more than 8,000 flights for October, November, December and the first few days of January and that it will monitor regulatory updates and make adjustments accordingly. Among other U.S. airlines that operate the MAX, Southwest Airlines Co has cancelled flights through Jan. 5, while American Airlines Group Inc has extended cancellations of Boeing 737 MAX flights through Jan. 15.

  • Royal Air Maroc says has not canceled Boeing 737 MAX orders
    Reuters

    Royal Air Maroc says has not canceled Boeing 737 MAX orders

    Royal Air Maroc (RAM) has not canceled orders for the Boeing 737 MAX, the Moroccan national carrier said on Friday, following conflicting remarks about the fate of two jets. "The order to receive the two aircraft has never been canceled," Hakim Challot, director of external communications, told Reuters. RAM has taken delivery of two Boeing 737 MAX and these were grounded along with the worldwide fleet in March, shortly after the second of two fatal accidents involving the widely used jet.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Royal Air Maroc says has not cancelled Boeing 737 MAX orders

    Royal Air Maroc (RAM) has not cancelled orders for the Boeing 737 MAX, the Moroccan national carrier said on Friday, following conflicting remarks about the fate of two jets. "The order to receive the two aircraft has never been cancelled," Hakim Challot, director of external communications, told Reuters. RAM has taken delivery of two Boeing 737 MAX and these were grounded along with the worldwide fleet in March, shortly after the second of two fatal accidents involving the widely used jet.

  • FAA Faulted by Panel in Approving Boeing's 737 Max
    Bloomberg

    FAA Faulted by Panel in Approving Boeing's 737 Max

    Oct.11 -- The Federal Aviation Administration's approval procedure for Boeing Co.'s 737 Max jetliner has been called into question following a report from the Joint Authorities Technical Review. Bloomberg Intelligence's George Ferguson has the details on "Bloomberg Markets."

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