LMT - Lockheed Martin Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
386.86
+0.92 (+0.24%)
At close: 4:03PM EST
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Previous close385.94
Open387.17
Bid386.06 x 800
Ask386.68 x 1000
Day's range385.10 - 388.90
52-week range241.18 - 399.96
Volume574,353
Avg. volume1,101,592
Market cap109.122B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.95
PE ratio (TTM)18.39
EPS (TTM)21.03
Earnings date27 Jan 2020 - 31 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield9.60 (2.49%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-29
1y target est403.42
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  • Bloomberg

    How Blacklisting Companies Became a Trade War Weapon

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Tariffs aren’t the only weapon in a trade war. Countries are also turning to “blacklists” to restrict the economic activities of certain foreign companies. While such steps are often described as necessary to preserve national security, they’re increasingly being deployed as policy tools to gain leverage in trade negotiations. In the case of the U.S. and China, disputes over human rights or geopolitics also can play a role.1\. Where is this happening?President Donald Trump has placed dozens of Chinese companies on the U.S. Commerce Department’s “entity list” -- a classification that restricts their ability to purchase U.S. software and components. China’s government has been considering hitting back with a blacklist of its own, targeting foreign companies, organizations and people it calls “unreliable entities.” Export powerhouses Japan and South Korea also have deployed trade restrictions in a renewal of a long feud dating back to Japan’s colonization of the Korean peninsula in the early 20th century.2\. Who is on the U.S. list?The most prominent among those blacklisted in May, primarily on national security grounds, is Huawei Technologies Co., the telecommunications giant at the forefront of fifth-generation, or 5G, mobile technology. In October, the U.S. added 28 Chinese companies -- including another eight technology giants -- for alleged human rights violations against Uighur Muslims in China’s far west Xinjiang province. Those companies include two of the world’s largest manufacturers of video surveillance products, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. and Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co., and a pair of artificial-intelligence companies, SenseTime Group Ltd. and Megvii Technology Ltd.3\. How is China responding?Slowly. In May, it said it was compiling its own list of “unreliable entities,” defined as those having “severely damaged the legitimate interests” of Chinese firms by not obeying market rules, violating contracts or blocking or cutting off supply for noncommercial reasons. None were identified but FedEx Corp. has been under particular scrutiny after China accused it of mis-routing some parcels sent by Huawei. In July, Chinese state media raised the specter of backlash against U.S. companies including General Dynamics Corp. and Honeywell International Inc. in connection with a proposed $2 billion U.S. arms sale to Taiwan. A month later, China vowed retaliation against U.S. companies participating in a proposed $8 billion U.S. sale of Lockheed Martin Corp. F-16 fighter jets to Taiwan. It also has pledged to retaliate against Trump’s sanctions related to human rights violations.4\. When will that happen?Soon, the Communist Party-backed Global Times said in early December. It reported said the list was being sped up in response to a bill moving through the U.S. Congress requiring measures against Chinese officials involved in alleged abuses of Uighurs. The bill passed the Senate in September and the House was set to vote on it in December. However, Chinese officials have said “soon” before.5\. What does it mean to be blacklisted by the U.S.?Those on the U.S. entity list are prohibited from doing business with American companies without first obtaining a U.S. government license. It was created in 1997 as a way to sanction companies that helped build weapons of mass destruction. It’s since been expanded to cover activities considered “contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.” Targets can be “businesses, research institutions, government and private organizations, individuals, and other types of legal persons,” according to the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security, which administers the list as part of U.S. Export Administration Regulations.6\. What about by China?Unclear. “Necessary measures will be taken” against those listed, was all Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said when he announced it May 31. However, the broad definition opens the possibility that a great swath of the global technology industry could be targeted, including U.S. giants such as Google, Qualcomm and Intel, as well as non-American suppliers that have cut off Huawei like Toshiba Corp. and SoftBank Group Corp.’s ARM Holdings. Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on his Twitter feed that U.S. officials and diplomats might face visa and travel restrictions.7\. What explains the increased use of blacklists?It’s part of what trade hawks in both governments see as a generational fight for technological and economic supremacy of the 21st century. The Chinese government has leveraged its massive state resources to support industrial policies like “Made in China 2025,” and a 2017 development strategy that aims to make China the world’s primary artificial intelligence innovation center by 2030. The Trump administration, backed by many in Congress, views this as a threat to America’s economic and national security and has actively sought to curb China’s technological ambitions.To contact the reporters on this story: Bryce Baschuk in Geneva at bbaschuk2@bloomberg.net;Brendan Murray in London at brmurray@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net, Laurence Arnold, Grant ClarkFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Lockheed Martin Wins $328M Deal to Acquire F-35 Components
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  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Italy approves second phase of F-35 investment programme - minister

    Italy will press ahead with an investment programme for F-35 fighter jets, Defence Minister Lorenzo Guerini said, after uncertainty over further orders from the Rome government had raised questions on production plans. "As the government aims to build on the investments made so far and seize the opportunities offered by the programme, I've decide to give a green light to the phase two," Guerini said during a parliamentary hearing on Thursday. Luigi Di Maio, leader of the co-ruling 5-Star Movement, said last year that F-35 fighter jets were not a priority for the country and that the programme had to be reviewed in 2019.

  • Lockheed Martin Secures $831M Deal to Support F-35 Program
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  • Lockheed (LMT) Up 5.3% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
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    Lockheed (LMT) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

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  • Lockheed Martin Wins Navy Deal to Configure CH-53K Aircraft
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  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Japan hosts first fully-fledged arms show looking for an edge in tech

    Japan's first ever fully fledged arms show opened on Monday, creating a forum that Japan's government hopes will help it tap technology it needs to counter threats posed by China and North Korean. Some 200 protesters gathered near the entrance of the convention centre near Tokyo, calling for the government-backed DSEI Japan exhibition to be shut down as they regarded it as an affront to the nation's pacifist constitution. Worried by increased Chinese military activity in the East China Sea and North Korea's ballistic missile advances, Japan has increased defence spending over the past seven years to around $50 billion annually, purchasing advanced U.S. stealth fighters, missile defence interceptors and radar systems.

  • Why Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE:LMT) Could Be Worth Watching
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  • Microsoft to Attend Pentagon Summit on Project Maven
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    (Bloomberg) -- Microsoft Corp. is sending representatives to a series of meetings with Pentagon officials Wednesday to discuss how companies can contribute to the military’s work on artificial intelligence, according to a list of participants reviewed by Bloomberg. Microsoft is the only Big Tech company set to attend the event, which is likely to draw objections from employees and protesters who have broad concerns about the use of AI for military purposes.About 140 companies and organizations are on the list of attendees, which includes Boeing Co., International Business Machines Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. Anduril Industries Inc., a new startup from former Facebook Inc. executive Palmer Luckey, will also be there. The defense contractor began working this year on Project Maven, a technology unit of the Pentagon whose official name is the Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team.For the last two years, Maven has been at the center of a contentious public debate over the technology industry’s willingness to help build military technology. The project uses computer vision software to automatically analyze footage gathered by U.S. military drones. Google, an early participant in Maven, said last summer it would stop working on the project, following protests from employees who said the work strayed too closely to autonomous weaponry. Employees at Clarifai, a small computer vision startup, also objected to Maven, although that company continued to work on the project. It is on the list of attendees for this week’s meetings, which are co-hosted by Maven officials.Wednesday’s event is billed as an “AI Industry Day,” and the stated goal is to develop AI technology to assist soldiers in the field. The government said it is particularly interested in facial recognition, natural language processing, social media data and drone footage.Microsoft has made significant inroads with its military business over the last year. It won a contract a year ago worth as much as $480 million to build combat-ready versions of its HoloLens augmented reality headsets. Last month, it also won a $10 billion contract called Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, to build cloud computing infrastructure for the Defense Department.Both contracts inspired criticism from Microsoft employees who said they hadn’t signed up to build weaponry. The company’s executives have consistently said they would not step back from working with the U.S. military. In a meeting with employees the week after the company won the JEDI contract, Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella said he respected dissenting opinions but that the company had always been unambiguous about its military work, according to a person who attended and asked not to be identified discussing a private event. A Microsoft spokesman declined to comment. Microsoft’s ties to government work have caused controversy in other areas, too. Workers at Microsoft’s GitHub unit have asked the company to cancel a contract with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. On Wednesday morning, a group of protesters gathered at a GitHub conference in San Francisco to draw attention to the issue.The Defense Department has put increasing focus on AI in recent years. It sees the technology as key to geopolitical competition with China. But building it has come with challenges. U.S. officials have spoken openly about tensions in the military’s relationship with tech companies.“Some employees in the tech industry see no compelling reason to work with the Department of Defense,” Lieutenant General Jack Shanahan, the head of the Pentagon’s Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, said at an event last week. Their reluctance, he said, often came from the government’s inability to adapt to the pace of the private sector: “We don’t make it easy for them.”(Updates with GitHub protests in the seventh paragraph.)To contact the author of this story: Joshua Brustein in New York at jbrustein@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, Vlad SavovFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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