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Cannabis Stocks

Cannabis Stocks

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  • For Business, Veganism Is the New Vaping
    Bloomberg

    For Business, Veganism Is the New Vaping

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Big food is salivating over fake meat after the blockbuster initial public offering of Beyond Meat Inc., the leading plant-based protein brand, in May.  Traditional producers have rushed into the booming market for meat substitutes, which threaten to take a slice of their business. Tyson Foods Inc. was an early investor in Beyond Meat, but sold its stake before the company’s trading debut and announced its own line of faux meat. Other U.S. companies, such as Smithfield Foods Inc., are introducing alternative protein products. European giants are getting in on the act too, with Nestle SA snapping up California-based Sweet Earth two years ago and Unilever NV buying The Vegetarian Butcher last year.It’s a familiar playbook. The big drinks companies have bought craft brewers. Major cosmetics houses are blending more artisan scents into perfumes. But there’s one segment where the similarities – and potential pitfalls -- are striking: tobacco, which is trying to woo smokers with the products they describe as lower risk, such as electronic cigarettes. Just as the tobacco industry has turned to vaping products to cope with high taxes and declining rates of smoking, big food sees a growing market for meat substitutes as people eat less animal protein and governments slap taxes on their other unhealthy products (and even consider levies on red meat). But traditional food manufacturers eager for vegan profits may struggle with some of the same obstacles tobacco has faced with vaping: adoption and regulation.Just look at Japan. It’s the most developed nation for devices that heat, rather than burn, tobacco, accounting for about 25% of the market. While tech-savvy early adopters were quick to switch to the new devices, older generations were slower to follow suit.Meat substitutes could see a similar trajectory. Analysts at Barclays Plc point out that men drive demand for meat. Convincing them –particularly older generations to switch -- will be crucial. Plant protein substitutes also tend to be more expensive. The premium will need to be whittled away for consumption to be widespread.While there’s no suggestion that fake meat products cause harm in any way – as has been alleged in some cases with vaping –  not everyone agrees that they are healthier than animal protein. Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. said it would not be stocking meat alternatives because they are too processed for the burrito chain. Beyond Meat has hit back at the claims, saying that its products and facilities are more transparent than those in the meat industry. More importantly, faux meat manufacturers will need to keep innovating – and investing – to grow, just as tobacco companies have had to come up with ways to make electronic cigarettes more satisfying for smokers to encourage them to switch. Plant-based protein producers will need to stay one step ahead of the competition with new ingredients, akin to how the market for milk substitutes expanded from soy to embrace soaring demand for nut and oat drinks. Beyond Meat and Nestle’s Sweet Earth use peas for their meatless dishes; Unilever’s The Vegetarian Butcher uses lupine beans to give some meals a fatty, nutty flavor. The possibilities are endless.Yet with innovation comes the risk of alienating consumers and inviting regulation. The magic ingredient at Impossible Foods Inc. – the other big independent plant-based protein maker – is heme, which gives its burgers a bloody meat-like taste. The ingredient is genetically engineered. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently found heme to be safe as a color additive, paving the way for sales in supermarkets. But using a genetically-engineered ingredient could turn off the very ethical, health-customers Impossible wants to attract.As big food courts vegans, it will confront pickier consumers than smokers-turned-vapers. Already some are worried about Burger King cooking the Impossible Whopper on the same grill as meat burgers, unless the customer asks for it to be prepared separately.A bigger danger would be if any plant products were found to contain animal traces. Impossible recently partnered with meat processor OSI Group to add more manufacturing capacity and ease supply constraints. It has dedicated capacity at OSI’s facilities, and the production line is not shared with animal-derived products. But it’s a risky move, and one that traditional meat producers going vegan will also have to manage.Like big tobacco, food manufacturers are already confronting challenges to the way they label products. States including Arkansas and Mississippi have banned companies from using the word “burgers” or “dogs” to describe plant-based alternatives. That’s a regulatory breeze compared the crackdown on vaping. In June, San Francisco became the first U.S. city to ban the sale of electronic cigarettes. But it’s still a headwind in what is a nascent industry. While the path of big tobacco highlights some of the challenges facing plant-based protein, there’s one more appetizing similarity. Last year, Altria Group Inc., which owns Philip Morris, took a 35% stake in Juul Labs Inc., the U.S. market-share leader in electronic cigarettes, valuing the company at $38 billion. Beyond Meat is now valued at a staggering $9 billion, almost a third of what food giant Tyson is worth. Such lofty valuations reflect long-term consumer trends. But as the tobacco industry has learned from its foray into alternatives, big food producers shouldn’t assume fake meat is an easy recipe for success.  To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stephanie Baker at stebaker@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Tilray, Splunk, and Retrophin Slumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Tilray, Splunk, and Retrophin Slumped Today

    Find out how earnings and other factors hit these stocks.

  • Aphria Makes ParcelPal Deal, Son Wins License
    Market Realist

    Aphria Makes ParcelPal Deal, Son Wins License

    Today, Aphria announced a deal with ParcelPal to deliver medical cannabis to patients. Also, Cole Cacciavillani's son has won a cannabis store license.

  • Smokable Hemp: Banned in North Carolina in May 2020
    Market Realist

    Smokable Hemp: Banned in North Carolina in May 2020

    On May 1, smokable hemp will be banned in North Carolina. The state passed the North Carolina Farm Act, removing smokable hemp from its permissible list.

  • Can Marijuana Legalization Spark Beto O’Rourke’s Bid?
    Market Realist

    Can Marijuana Legalization Spark Beto O’Rourke’s Bid?

    Marijuana reform is central to Beto O’Rourke's 2020 presidential campaign—how could his agenda that affect the cannabis industry?

  • Here's What You Should Know About AbbVie Inc.'s (NYSE:ABBV) 6.3% Dividend Yield
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's What You Should Know About AbbVie Inc.'s (NYSE:ABBV) 6.3% Dividend Yield

    Today we'll take a closer look at AbbVie Inc. (NYSE:ABBV) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a strong...

  • Why Aurora Cannabis May Have Made a Big Mistake By Not Partnering With a Beverage Company
    Motley Fool

    Why Aurora Cannabis May Have Made a Big Mistake By Not Partnering With a Beverage Company

    The battle for the edibles market, and beverages, in particular, is about to heat up, and Aurora Cannabis could be in danger of falling behind its peers.

  • Motley Fool

    Tilray Signs Landmark European Shipment Deal

    The company will deliver $3.3 million worth of medical cannabis from its facility in Portugal to Germany.

  • Boston Beer (SAM) Up 44% in 6 Months: Will Momentum Sustain?
    Zacks

    Boston Beer (SAM) Up 44% in 6 Months: Will Momentum Sustain?

    Boston Beer (SAM) remains committed to the three-point growth plan. Also, the company's focus on cost savings, long-term innovation, and the revival of Samuel Adams and Angry Orchard brands bode well.

  • James Simons: What Interests Him in the Cannabis Space?
    Market Realist

    James Simons: What Interests Him in the Cannabis Space?

    James Simons is the world’s wealthiest hedge fund manager. He made significant investments in the cannabis sector this year.

  • 3 Popular Pot Stocks At or Near Their 2019 Lows That Still Aren't Worth Buying
    Motley Fool

    3 Popular Pot Stocks At or Near Their 2019 Lows That Still Aren't Worth Buying

    Despite plunging valuations, these well-known marijuana stocks are worth avoiding.

  • Why Did Tilray Stock Rise More than 10% Yesterday?
    Market Realist

    Why Did Tilray Stock Rise More than 10% Yesterday?

    Tilray (TLRY) stock rose 10.4% on Wednesday. According to Bloomberg, the company expects to be profitable in Canada in the next quarter or two.

  • Marijuana: What Do Buffett and the Richest Americans Think?
    Market Realist

    Marijuana: What Do Buffett and the Richest Americans Think?

    Marijuana is a hot topic right now! From presidential candidates to the wealthiest Americans, everyone is talking about the sector.

  • Motley Fool

    When Will the Big Canadian Cannabis Producers Become Profitable?

    Hint: Most are years away from delivering consistent profits. But there's one notable exception.

  • Altria Stock: Key Indicators and Risks
    Market Realist

    Altria Stock: Key Indicators and Risks

    Altria (MO) stock has lagged the broader market in 2019. On August 17, the CDC noted that it is investigating lung diseases linked to e-cigarette use.

  • Aphria’s Strategic Growth Initiatives Drive APHA Stock
    Market Realist

    Aphria’s Strategic Growth Initiatives Drive APHA Stock

    Aphria stock (APHA) has surged 26.4% since the company announced its Q4 earnings results. Will Aphria's growth strategy keep paying off?

  • Synlogic Discontinues Development of SYNB1020, Stock Down
    Zacks

    Synlogic Discontinues Development of SYNB1020, Stock Down

    Synlogic (SYBX) discontinues the development of its early-stage pipeline candidate, SYNB1020, for the treatment of hyperammonemia, following disappointing study results.

  • New Study Shows 14% of Americans Use CBD
    Motley Fool

    New Study Shows 14% of Americans Use CBD

    Yet cannabis products represent a largely untapped market in the U.S.

  • Bloomberg

    Tilray to Post a Profit in Canada in the ‘Next Quarter or Two,’ CEO Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Tilray Inc. will be profitable in Canada in the “next quarter or two” and in Europe in the next two to three quarters, according to Chief Executive Officer Brendan Kennedy.“We’ll continue to invest in new regions and new countries, but on an existing basis in terms of our existing footprint, we see profitability within the next half year to year,” Kennedy said in an interview on Bloomberg TV.The pot producer’s stock jumped as much as 8.9% following Kennedy’s comments. It had lost 36% over the previous five sessions after Tilray reported a wider-than-expected loss of $17.9 million before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.Kennedy said last week that the industry is still in a growth phase and “you’d be constraining yourself if you were focused on profitability at this point.”Investors, however, are increasingly rewarding cannabis companies that turn a profit, or at least show a path to profitability, and punishing those that don’t. Canopy Growth Corp. fell 14% last Thursday after CEO Mark Zekulin said it won’t report a net profit for three to five years.To contact the reporters on this story: Kristine Owram in Toronto at kowram@bloomberg.net;Ed Hammond in New York at ehammond12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brad Olesen at bolesen3@bloomberg.net, Divya BaljiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    CannTrust’s 84% Plunge From Peak Wipes Out Gains Since IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Exactly two years after its debut, CannTrust Holdings Inc.’s stock has fallen beneath its listing price of C$2.50.The pot company has lost nearly two-thirds of its value since early July when it revealed it had broken Canadian regulations by growing cannabis in unlicensed areas of its greenhouse in Pelham, Ontario, potentially putting its license at risk.The negative headlines have mounted since then. Chief Executive Officer Peter Aceto was fired and Chairman Eric Paul resigned; a joint task force of securities regulators and police is investigating the company for potential “serious violations of the law”; auditor KPMG LLP withdrew its reports on the company’s year-end and first-quarter results; regulators found further breaches at a second facility in Vaughan, Ontario; and Ontario’s cannabis wholesaler is returning C$2.9 million worth of products at the company’s expense.CannTrust has hired Greenhill & Co. to explore potential alternatives including a sale.The stock fell as low as C$2.45 on Wednesday, down 5.8%. If it ends the day at that level, it would be the lowest close since September 2017. Short interest stood at 8% of the public float on Aug. 20, according to IHS Markit data.CannTrust is in the midst of an “organizational transformation, which has included a number of departures and the reassignment of roles and responsibilities,” company spokeswoman Jane Shapiro said in an email Wednesday.It has appointed Dan Hogan, formerly CEO of luggage and handbag retailer eBags Inc., as head of strategic priorities. Ken Doige has been named vice president of security. Doige was previously vice president of compliance and risk management at cannabis retailer Fire & Flower Holdings Corp.To contact the reporter on this story: Kristine Owram in Toronto at kowram@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brad Olesen at bolesen3@bloomberg.net, Morwenna ConiamFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Jim Cramer: Cronos and Aphria Passed Canopy Growth
    Market Realist

    Jim Cramer: Cronos and Aphria Passed Canopy Growth

    On Tuesday, Jim Cramer stated that Cronos Group and Aphria passed Canopy Growth. Canopy Growth has lost 15.3% of its stock value since its Q1 earnings.

  • Motley Fool

    This Pot Stock Is Headed for a Massive Meltdown According to 1 Analyst

    Is a plunge of 85% or more really in store for one of the biggest Canadian cannabis producers?

  • Could President Trump Boost the Cannabis Industry?
    Market Realist

    Could President Trump Boost the Cannabis Industry?

    President Trump might be waiting to use cannabis as a key platform during the upcoming election. Cannabis is a hot sector right now!

  • 4 of the Most Efficient Marijuana Stocks
    Motley Fool

    4 of the Most Efficient Marijuana Stocks

    These cannabis stocks should have some of the best growing yields per square foot in the industry.

  • Bayer Sells Animal Health Division to Elanco: Now What?
    Zacks

    Bayer Sells Animal Health Division to Elanco: Now What?

    On Tuesday, Bayer (BAYRY) announced the sale of its animal-health division to American competitor Elanco (ELAN), for a net price of $7.6 billion. The deal is expected to close in mid-2020 after regulatory approval.

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