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Recent 52-Week Highs

Recent 52-Week Highs

8.96k followers1 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track stocks that have set 52-week highs within the last week. This list is generated daily, ranked by market cap and limited to the top 30 stocks that meet the criteria.

1 symbols

  • Cloudflare Fades Early Gain
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    Cloudflare Fades Early Gain

    The emerging leader in the software space reversed lower Tuesday after hitting a new high.

  • Cloudflare Shows Uncanny Strength
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    Cloudflare Shows Uncanny Strength

    The company operates a cloud platform, offering a range of network services

  • Dow Jones Dives After Historic 3-Day Surge
    Investor's Business Daily Video

    Dow Jones Dives After Historic 3-Day Surge

    Major stocks fell sharply Friday, ending the week on a sour note, as the coronavirus continued to spread rapidly in the U.S.

  • Coronavirus selloff spares cybersecurity stocks because security is a 'corporate need'
    Yahoo Finance

    Coronavirus selloff spares cybersecurity stocks because security is a 'corporate need'

    Cybersecurity stocks have seen a boost as more companies shift to work from home.

  • Implied Volatility Surging for Cloudflare (NET) Stock Options
    Zacks

    Implied Volatility Surging for Cloudflare (NET) Stock Options

    Investors need to pay close attention to Cloudflare (NET) stock based on the movements in the options market lately.

  • US$22.61 - That's What Analysts Think Cloudflare, Inc. Is Worth After These Results
    Simply Wall St.

    US$22.61 - That's What Analysts Think Cloudflare, Inc. Is Worth After These Results

    Last week, you might have seen that Cloudflare, Inc. (NYSE:NET) released its yearly result to the market. The early...

  • 400 Million Social Media Users Are Set to Lose Their Anonymity in India
    Bloomberg

    400 Million Social Media Users Are Set to Lose Their Anonymity in India

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and TikTok will have to reveal users’ identities if Indian government agencies ask them to, according to the country’s controversial new rules for social media companies and messaging apps expected to be published later this month.The requirement comes as governments around the world are trying to hold social media companies more accountable for the content that circulates on their platforms, whether it’s fake news, child porn, racist invective or terrorism-related content. India’s new guidelines go further than most other countries’ by requiring blanket cooperation with government inquiries, no warrant or judicial order required.India proposed these guidelines in Dec. 2018 and asked for public comment. The Internet and Mobile Association of India, a trade group that counts Facebook Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google among its members, responded that the requirements “would be a violation of the right to privacy recognized by the Supreme Court.”But the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology is expected to publish the new rules later this month without major changes, according to a government official familiar with the matter.“The guidelines for intermediaries are under process,” said N.N. Kaul, the media adviser to the minister of electronics & information technology. “We cannot comment on the guidelines or changes till they are published.”The provisions in the earlier draft had required platforms such as Google’s YouTube or ByteDance Inc.’s TikTok, Facebook or its Instagram and WhatsApp apps, to help the government trace the origins of a post within 72 hours of a request. The companies would also have to preserve their records for at least 180 days to aid government investigators, establish a brick-and-mortar operation within India and appoint both a grievance officer to deal with user complaints and a government liaison. The Ministry is still finalizing the language and content.The rules cover all social media and messaging apps with more than 5 million users. India, with 1.3 billion people, has about 500 million internet users. It isn’t clear whether the identities of foreign users would be subject to the Indian government’s inquiries.Law enforcement agencies around the world have been frustrated by tech companies that have refused to identify users, unlock devices or generally cooperate with government investigations, particularly in cases relating to terrorism.In India, where the internet -- and fake news -- are still relatively new phenomenon, a false report of rampant child abduction and organ harvesting circulated widely via WhatsApp, leading to mob violence and over three dozen fatal lynchings in 2017 and 2018.WhatsApp refused a request from the government to reveal the origins of the rumors, citing its promise of privacy and end-to-end encryption for its 400 million Indian users. It instead offered to fund research into preventing the spread of fake news and mounted a public education campaign in the country, its biggest global market.WhatsApp will “not compromise on security because that would make people less safe,” it said in a statement Wednesday, adding its global user base had reached over 2 billion. “For even more protection, we work with top security experts, employ industry leading technology to stop misuse as well as provide controls and ways to report issues — without sacrificing privacy.”At the same time, tech companies and civil rights groups say the new rules are an invitation to abuse and censorship, as well as a burdensome requirement on new and growing companies.In an open letter to India’s IT minister Ravi Shankar Prasad, executives from Mozilla Corp., GitHub Inc. and Cloudflare Inc. said the guidelines could lead to “automated censorship” and “increase surveillance.“ In order to be able to trace the originator of content, platforms would basically be required to surveil their users, undermine encryption, and harm the fundamental right to privacy of Indian users, they said.Companies such as Mozilla or Wikipedia wouldn’t fall under the new rules, the government official said. Browsers, operating systems, and online repositories of knowledge, software development platforms, are all exempt. Only social media platforms and messaging apps will be covered.To contact the reporter on this story: Saritha Rai in Bangalore at srai33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Janet Paskin, Abhay SinghFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Cyber expert: 'Bored kids' are committing cyberattacks to avoid tests
    Yahoo Finance

    Cyber expert: 'Bored kids' are committing cyberattacks to avoid tests

    Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince says that bored students are committing cyberattacks to get out of taking tests.

  • Presidential elections are like 'the World's Cup of cybersecurity attacks': Cloudflare CEO
    Yahoo Finance

    Presidential elections are like 'the World's Cup of cybersecurity attacks': Cloudflare CEO

    Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince joins Yahoo Finance live from the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos.

  • Cloudflare is giving away its security tools to US political campaigns
    TechCrunch

    Cloudflare is giving away its security tools to US political campaigns

    Network security giant Cloudflare said it will provide its security tools and services to U.S. political campaigns for free, as part of its efforts to secure upcoming elections against cyberattacks and election interference. The company said its new Cloudflare for Campaigns offering will include distributed denial-of-service attack mitigation, load balancing for campaign websites, a website firewall and anti-bot protections. Cloudflare's co-founder and chief executive Matthew Prince said there was a "clear need" to help campaigns secure not only their public-facing websites but also their internal data security.

  • Cloudflare acquires stealthy startup S2 Systems, announces Cloudflare for Teams
    TechCrunch

    Cloudflare acquires stealthy startup S2 Systems, announces Cloudflare for Teams

    Cloudflare announced that it has acquired S2 Systems, a browser isolation startup founded by former Microsoft execs. The two companies did not reveal the acquisition price. Matthew Prince, co-founder and CEO at Cloudflare, says that this acquisition is part of a new suite of products called Cloudflare for Teams, which has been designed to protect an organization from threats on the internet.

  • GitHub, Mozilla and Cloudflare appeal to India to be transparent about changes in its intermediary liability rules
    TechCrunch

    GitHub, Mozilla and Cloudflare appeal to India to be transparent about changes in its intermediary liability rules

    Microsoft’s GitHub, Mozilla and Cloudflare have urged India to be transparent about the amendments it is making to an upcoming law that could affect swathes of companies and the way more than half a billion people access information online. In December 2018, the Indian government proposed changes to its intermediary rules (PDF) that would require any service that facilitates communication between two or more users and had more than 5 million users in India to set up a local office and have a senior executive in the nation who could be held responsible for any legal issues. The proposal also suggested that any of these services must be able to take down questionable content within 24 hours and share the user data within 72 hours of request.

  • Exclusive: Labour sticks to 'basic' $20 cyber defence after attacks, emails show
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Labour sticks to 'basic' $20 cyber defence after attacks, emails show

    Britain's opposition Labour Party was using a $20-a-month "basic security" service to protect its website when hackers attempted to force it offline last week and temporarily slowed down online campaigning, according to internal emails seen by Reuters. Such entry-level protection is not recommended for large organisations at high risk of cyberattacks, but the messages show Labour has since decided against upgrading to an increased security package on grounds of cost. Labour and Britain's governing Conservative Party were hit by back-to-back cyberattacks last week, just days into an election campaign security officials have warned could be disrupted by foreign hackers.

  • Exclusive: UK's Labour sticks to 'basic' $20 cyber defense after attacks, emails show
    Reuters

    Exclusive: UK's Labour sticks to 'basic' $20 cyber defense after attacks, emails show

    Britain's opposition Labour Party was using a $20-a-month "basic security" service to protect its website when hackers attempted to force it offline last week and temporarily slowed down online campaigning, according to internal emails seen by Reuters. Such entry-level protection is not recommended for large organizations at high risk of cyberattacks, but the messages show Labour has since decided against upgrading to an increased security package on grounds of cost. Labour and Britain's governing Conservative Party were hit by back-to-back cyberattacks last week, just days into an election campaign security officials have warned could be disrupted by foreign hackers.

  • Cloudflare (NET): Latest IPO To Disappoint Investors
    Zacks

    Cloudflare (NET): Latest IPO To Disappoint Investors

    Cloudflare (NET): Latest IPO To Disappoint Investors

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