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Most Removed from Watchlists

Most Removed from Watchlists

2.64k followers19 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track stocks that were removed from most watchlists by Yahoo Finance Users. This list is generated daily and limited to the top 30 stocks that meet the criteria.

Curated by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track stocks that were removed from most watchlists by Yahoo Finance Users. This list is generated daily and limited to the top 30 stocks that meet the criteria.

Background

Yahoo Finance employs sophisticated algorithms to monitor and detect trends in the Global Financial Markets. We bring these insights to you in the form of watchlists.

Find other winning investment ideas with the Yahoo Finance Screener.

How are these weighted?

The stocks in this watchlist are weighted equally.

Performance

WatchlistChange today1-month return1-year returnTotal return
Most Removed from Watchlists----
^GSPC----

19 symbols

SymbolCompany nameLast priceChange% changeMarket timeVolumeAvg vol (3-month)Market cap
ORCLOracle Corporation55.28-0.22-0.40%16:02 GMT-47.71M12.88M169.64B
DDominion Energy, Inc.79.63-0.08-0.10%16:02 GMT-42.68M4.59M66.90B
SIRISirius XM Holdings Inc.5.92+0.02+0.40%16:00 GMT-417.97M31.18M25.69B
RBSThe Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc3.09-0.02-0.64%16:00 GMT-4714.11k2.04M18.54B
INVHInvitation Homes Inc.29.33-0.09-0.31%16:00 GMT-42.43M4.07M16.44B
VARVarian Medical Systems, Inc.173.09-0.42-0.24%16:03 GMT-42.87M956.96k15.74B
ADTADT Inc.12.02-0.76-5.95%16:00 GMT-410.02M5.47M9.26B
WBWeibo Corporation35.49-0.45-1.25%16:00 GMT-4921.14k1.90M8.04B
ERIEldorado Resorts, Inc.38.24+0.24+0.63%16:00 GMT-415.50M8.65M6.97B
SSLSasol Limited8.56-0.16-1.83%16:00 GMT-4849.20k3.73M5.45B
TRGPTarga Resources Corp.19.36-0.80-3.97%16:00 GMT-43.01M3.87M4.51B
EQMEQT Midstream Partners, LP21.43+0.06+0.28%16:00 GMT-421.47M2.21M4.45B
TERPTerraForm Power, Inc.19.35--16:00 GMT-4-1.47M4.38B
AMRNAmarin Corporation plc7.05+0.19+2.77%16:00 GMT-46.74M6.43M2.72B
RCELAVITA Therapeutics, Inc.23.64+0.57+2.47%16:00 GMT-452.78k84.94k2.52B
EPREPR Properties30.09+0.59+2.00%16:00 GMT-41.19M1.50M2.33B
BNDSFBanco de Sabadell, S.A.0.35--12:42 GMT-45.28k12.47k2.13B
SHAKShake Shack Inc.50.22+1.31+2.68%16:00 GMT-41.16M1.46M2.08B
  • Warren Buffett, How About an Earnings Call?
    Bloomberg

    Warren Buffett, How About an Earnings Call?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Saturday is Berkshire Hathaway Inc. earnings day, but don’t count on there being many insights from Warren Buffett himself.As Berkshire prepares to report its latest operating results and an update to its even more closely followed cash figure, what investors want most of all is to hear from the Oracle of Omaha. But unlike other companies, Berkshire’s quarterly earnings aren’t that illuminating. They usually entail only a perfunctory statement of the overarching numbers, with no prepared remarks or chance to ask questions.Berkshire’s longstanding tradition of not hosting earnings calls has always made it an outlier in Corporate America — that and the unconventional practice of reporting on weekends. But not having any regular forum to hear from Buffett and Berkshire’s other executives is especially unfortunate during a global pandemic and recession in which shareholders are seeking direction.Buffett has lived through numerous crises, and each time he remained sanguine about America’s economic prospects, while the conglomerate and reputation he built always emerged relatively unscathed.  Covid-19 changed that. Shares of Berkshire have fallen 10% this year, while the S&P 500 index is back in positive territory.The last time shareholders heard directly from Buffett, he was in a lonely auditorium sounding dispirited during what should have been Berkshire’s annual investor summit. The company, which in the past has taken advantage of downturns to vacuum up good companies, was instead selling stocks as the virus worsened. Meanwhile, some of the most resilient members of the market have been technology companies and dividend payers — Berkshire is adamantly neither. Buffett did warm to two tech giants in recent years: Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc., investments valued at $108 billion and $1.7 billion, respectively. But Buffett was a latecomer to the space, which has boasted a 208% return over the past five years, compared with Berkshire’s 42% gain. Increasingly, observers are questioning whether Buffett has lost his touch. Berkshire’s operating results, which are fairly predictable, have become less relevant to its shareholders over time. That’s not just because its stock-market investments now account for more than half the company’s value. It’s also that so much of the reason for owning Berkshire stock is the prospect of what Buffett does with the company’s cash. Lately, that’s been very little. Berkshire did buy more shares in Bank of America Corp. in recent days, after ditching most of its Goldman Sachs Group Inc. stake, but investors won’t find out what else Berkshire bought and sold until next week. Last month, it agreed to acquire $10 billion of natural-gas assets and associated debt from Dominion Energy Inc., a deal that had strategic logic, but fell well short of the fireworks moment investors have long awaited. (In June, I wrote that  Costco Wholesale Corp. should be Buffett’s next takeover target — now that would set off fireworks.) Bill Ackman, the widely followed hedge-fund manager, even exited a position in Berkshire in May after determining Buffett’s reluctance to do deals may hold back its stock price. If not a deal, there’s at least one other announcement investors are bracing for: Buffett stepping down. He’s set to turn 90 years old at the end of the month, which he jokes is “urgent” territory. He has taken notable steps in recent years to line up his succession, such as elevating Greg Abel from the energy side of the business and Ajit Jain from the reinsurance side to vice chairmen. Abel also joined Buffett on stage during the virtual May meeting, as opposed to Charlie Munger, who is 96.Earnings calls can be mundane, especially when executives waste the time rattling off a financial report card that can be found in public filings. But they can also be fascinating opportunities to hear from people with a special vantage point in the broader economy. In the case of Berkshire, it would also be a chance for shareholders to get better acquainted with Abel or whoever is tasked with someday filling Buffett’s shoes, as well as the many other executives that run Berkshire’s dozens of businesses. And plus, how can Buffett retire without ever getting to hear “Nice quarter, guys?”This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Bank of England Is Playing With Fire
    Bloomberg

    The Bank of England Is Playing With Fire

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The Bank of England risks being in a category of one. On Thursday, in its quarterly monetary policy report, it presented a surprisingly chipper assessment of how it expects the U.K. to recover from the pandemic lockdown.Its relative optimism was in jarring contrast to the gloom that’s engulfed Britain’s big lending banks. BOE Governor Andrew Bailey has had a decent crisis up until now, but he’ll dent his credibility if he’s seen as being too much of a cheerleader.Barclays Plc, HSBC Holdings Plc, Lloyds Banking Group Plc and Natwest Group Plc presented an unremittingly pessimistic outlook for the U.K. with their earnings results over the past couple of weeks. Collectively, the big lenders have taken 17.2 billion pounds ($23 billion) of cumulative writedowns this year, mostly in anticipation of future loan losses caused by the Covid lockdowns and the subsequent economic damage.By contrast, the BOE’s recovery scenario looks positively heroic, with an expectation that Gross Domestic Product will grow by a whopping 18% in the third quarter. The central bank also expects overall U.K. loan losses this year to be somewhat less than the 80 billion pounds it anticipated in May.This divergence of economic views between Bailey’s team and Britain’s top bankers is unusual. A central bank typically tries to provide balanced economic forecasts, finding a mid-point between the worst and best possible outcomes. But most of the risk in this one appears to be on the downside, something the governor acknowledged on Thursday.The biggest leap of faith is the BOE’s year-end unemployment forecast of 7.5%. That is nearly double its pre-Covid level, but NatWest expects an increase to 9.2%-9.8%, with a worst-case estimate of 14.4%. High unemployment is a very serious problem for Britain’s banks, who are heavily exposed to consumer and mortgage lending.You can see why Bailey would want to make the banks feel less despondent. The BOE needs them to lend, as that is its main transmission mechanism for getting money into the real economy. The banks have funds available but that doesn’t make them willing lenders when they fear the specter of bad loans, a phenomenon the European Central Bank has long struggled with. The sensible thing would be further enticements to get banks to use the BOE’s super-cheap borrowing pot — the so-called term funding scheme. Lenders can use this tool to get loans from the central bank, which they can in turn lend to small and medium-sized businesses. Bailey could make this more widely available or even make the loans essentially free to the banks.At the moment, the banking sector is hearing mixed messages from different parts of the BOE. The monetary policy committee may well be saying now that loan losses will be less severe than forecast in May, but the central bank is also the regulatory supervisor for the industry and lenders are fearful about getting into trouble by eating into their capital buffers.In fairness to Bailey, it’s natural that the commercial banks will be as conservative as possible in their assumptions, given that they can’t be blamed for the pandemic. But it still feels odd that these two parts of the City are singing such different tunes. The BOE has often acted in lockstep with the U.K. government, via the Treasury, in its response to the crisis. It’s troubling that it’s so out of sync with the bankers.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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