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Most Sold By Hedge Funds

Most Sold By Hedge Funds

7.55k followers30 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track the stocks that were sold the most by hedge funds in the last quarter.

30 symbols

  • Hess (HES) Q4 Earnings Miss Estimates on Oil Price Slump
    Zacks

    Hess (HES) Q4 Earnings Miss Estimates on Oil Price Slump

    Hess' (HES) fourth-quarter earnings are affected by lower commodity price realization and increased operating expenses, partially offset by higher hydrocarbon production.

  • Are Investors Undervaluing Murphy Oil (MUR) Right Now?
    Zacks

    Are Investors Undervaluing Murphy Oil (MUR) Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • Yes, You Can Time the Market. Find out How - January 29, 2020
    Zacks

    Yes, You Can Time the Market. Find out How - January 29, 2020

    Is the ability to time the markets more of a data-driven science or a 'gut - feeling' art?

  • Hess (HES) Reports Q4 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates
    Zacks

    Hess (HES) Reports Q4 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

    Hess (HES) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -7.14% and 8.08%, respectively, for the quarter ended December 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Halliburton (HAL) Wins Seven Next-Phase Ichthys Contracts
    Zacks

    Halliburton (HAL) Wins Seven Next-Phase Ichthys Contracts

    US oilfield contractor Halliburton (HAL) has been awarded major drilling contracts for Ichthys Phase-2 by INPEX.

  • Marathon Oil (MRO) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Marathon Oil (MRO) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Marathon Oil (MRO) closed at $11.77, marking a +0.68% move from the previous day.

  • Does Market Volatility Impact Range Resources Corporation's (NYSE:RRC) Share Price?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Market Volatility Impact Range Resources Corporation's (NYSE:RRC) Share Price?

    If you own shares in Range Resources Corporation (NYSE:RRC) then it's worth thinking about how it contributes to the...

  • Are Investors Undervaluing Berry Petroleum (BRY) Right Now?
    Zacks

    Are Investors Undervaluing Berry Petroleum (BRY) Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • Eni (E) Discovers First Gas Field In Sharjah in 37 Years
    Zacks

    Eni (E) Discovers First Gas Field In Sharjah in 37 Years

    Eni (ENI) continues its discovery streak with the addition of Mahani-1 exploration well, the first onshore discovery in the UAE Sharjah, since the early 1980s.

  • What's in the Cards for Murphy Oil (MUR) in Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

    What's in the Cards for Murphy Oil (MUR) in Q4 Earnings?

    Benefits from stable growth platforms like Eagle Ford Shale and Gulf of Mexico assets are likely to get reflected on Murphy Oil's (MUR) fourth-quarter 2019 results.

  • Why the Earnings Surprise Streak Could Continue for Horizon Therapeutics (HZNP)
    Zacks

    Why the Earnings Surprise Streak Could Continue for Horizon Therapeutics (HZNP)

    Horizon Therapeutics (HZNP) has an impressive earnings surprise history and currently possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely beat in its next quarterly report.

  • Will Chevron (CVX) Pull Out of Indonesian Deepwater Stake?
    Zacks

    Will Chevron (CVX) Pull Out of Indonesian Deepwater Stake?

    Chevron (CVX) is contemplating the potential sale of its stake in the Indonesian Deepwater Development gas project to control costs and prepare for long-term low prices.

  • CNX Resources (CNX) to Report Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?
    Zacks

    CNX Resources (CNX) to Report Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?

    CNX Resources' (CNX) fourth-quarter earnings are expected to have benefited from additional production from new wells. However, decline in commodity price might have been a concern.

  • Gym Chains Wrestle With Debt Even as Fitness Industry Is Growing
    Bloomberg

    Gym Chains Wrestle With Debt Even as Fitness Industry Is Growing

    (Bloomberg) -- It’s midday, mid-January at a New York Sports Club in Manhattan. Weights are clanking. Classic rock is pumping. Sweat is sprouting. A steady stream of customers files in and out.Despite the buzz of the busiest time of year, debt problems are bedeviling the fitness business, especially middle-market gym chains such as parent company Town Sports International Holdings Inc. and its peer, 24 Hour Fitness Worldwide Inc.Gyms have benefited from economic expansion. More Americans than ever have memberships. But popularity aside, middle-tier operators “don’t have the same price advantage of a low-cost gym or the competitive advantage of a boutique fitness option,” said Emile Courtney of S&P Global Ratings.They’re up against luxury operators like Equinox Holdings Inc., with its eucalyptus-scented towels and debt that trades at 100 cents on the dollar. By contrast, Town Sports and 24 Hour struggle with customer turnover and their loans are sold at discounts of more than 20%.“Personalization and tribalism are fueling the boutique demand, especially among millennials,” said Meredith Poppler of the trade group International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association. “Most people want to be with ‘their people,’ the people like them who have the same passions. Boutiques deliver on that.”Town Sports, with 600,000 members, has a $194 million loan due in November. Before its proposal earlier this month to buy Flywheel Sports Inc., an indoor cycling club with 300,000 members, Town Sports hadn’t outlined a plan to repay it, according to Margaret Taylor of Moody’s Investors Service.Delay MaturityBut the company can delay the loan’s maturity four years if it completes the acquisition. Kennedy Lewis Investment Management, the current Flywheel owner, would also bring $50 million to the transaction.The plan, however, is conditioned on the support of existing debt holders. Without their consent, the deal could fall apart and the company would be left with the loan’s November maturity.Ideally, adding Flywheel would give Town Sports the chance to boost revenue by selling members more expensive packages, according to S&P. Even so, the debt taken on to buy Flywheel would probably mean more financial strain on Town Sports, S&P said.Sweeten AppealThe Town Sports loan coming due this year is trading at about 76.5 cents on the dollar, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Shares of the company, which hit $14.75 in July 2018, now go for less than $3.Town Sports didn’t respond to requests for comment.The Flywheel acquisition is also an effort to sweeten Town Sports’s appeal to boutique customers like 29-year-old Alexandra Antonacci-Bolanos. The medical-device executive from West Islip, New York, said she doesn’t mind paying more for fitness because it lifts her spirits. On top of $70 a month for a gym membership, she said she spends about $36 a class for SoulCycle -- a company under the same corporate umbrella as Equinox -- which is often described as a cardio dance party.“It’s my therapy,” she said.Rocky DebutClosely held 24 Hour Fitness, with more than 440 clubs, carries too much debt for what it earns, according to Taylor of Moody’s. The company reported a slide in earnings last year partly due to the rocky debut of an automated system for checking in and signing up customers. Its membership declined to 3.4 million at the end of the third quarter from 3.5 million in the previous quarter, according to Moody’s. Its average monthly attrition rate rose to 4.1% compared with 3.9% in the third quarter of last year.Cancellations are killers for gyms. It costs twice as much to recruit a new member as it does to retain an existing one. Roughly 28 of 100 U.S. gym members are expected to bail this year, according to the trade group.24 Hour Fitness’s more than $800 million term loan is trading at around 78 cents on the dollar, according to Bloomberg pricing data.“We see a tremendous opportunity in the mid-tier that hasn’t yet been realized,” Tony Ueber, 24 Hour Fitness’s chief executive officer, said in a statement to Bloomberg. “As a result, we are in the process of transforming our business model and making the necessary investments to firmly establish a leadership position in the industry.”Monthly FeesMeanwhile, shares of Planet Fitness Inc., with its $10 monthly fees and promise of “judgment-free zones,” have gained about 36% in the past year.Though S&P said last week it downgraded Equinox to B-, non-investment-grade territory, because its increased expenses make the company more vulnerable to an economic downturn or “an inadvertent operating misstep,” the credit-rating company also lauded Equinox’s “strong brand awareness among consumers” and customer loyalty that set it apart from competitors.Closely held Equinox said it planned to open 10 new clubs this year. It declined to comment on its financial position.Jonathan Germer, a 29-year-old teacher from Sayville, New York, said he’s involved in different approaches to fitness, including Crossfit Inc. He said he likes the sense of community of Peloton Interactive Inc., even though he shares no physical space with others.Germer said he spent just under $2,000 for a Peloton stationary bike and pays $40 a month for a digital membership that allows him to join streaming classes at home.“To be able to feel like you’re a part of something that feels bigger than small-time America is great for so many people,” Germer said. “It feels bigger than a little fitness world.”To contact the reporter on this story: Katherine Doherty in New York at kdoherty23@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rick Green at rgreen18@bloomberg.net, Bob IvryFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Juniper (JNPR) to Report Q4 Earnings: What's in the Cards?
    Zacks

    Juniper (JNPR) to Report Q4 Earnings: What's in the Cards?

    Juniper's (JNPR) fourth-quarter performance is likely to have benefited from its go-to-market structure to better align sales strategies with each of its core customer verticals.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: MKSI, LM, MUR, MDC and WCC
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: MKSI, LM, MUR, MDC and WCC

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: MKSI, LM, MUR, MDC and WCC

  • Hess (HES) Gears Up for Q4 Earnings: What's in the Cards?
    Zacks

    Hess (HES) Gears Up for Q4 Earnings: What's in the Cards?

    Although an increase in total US production is expected to boost Hess' (HES) Q4 earnings, declining average selling prices of crude oil might partially dampen growth.

  • It’s Hard to Pull Off 3 Billion Trips During a Pandemic
    Bloomberg

    It’s Hard to Pull Off 3 Billion Trips During a Pandemic

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There’s never a good time for the outbreak of a deadly virus, but this one is particularly bad. China’s Lunar New Year is often dubbed the world’s largest migration, a stretch of weeks when hundreds of millions of people visit their families. Before the pandemic started spreading, officials were expecting 3 billion airplane and train trips during the holiday rush between Jan. 10 and Feb. 18. Millions more have gone abroad.Little wonder, then, that the travel industry is suffering. With the death toll up to 25 and more than 800 infected, tourists are staying home. Some have no choice: The government has put seven cities on lockdown and airports are stepping up screening measures. On Friday, China ordered all travel agencies to suspend sales of domestic and international tours.Shares of China Southern Airlines Co. – the carrier most exposed to the site of the outbreak – have slid 14% since the second death from the virus was confirmed, while Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd., which said it would waive fees for tickets to and from the mainland, has slumped 7.6%. The country’s largest online travel agency, Trip.com Group Ltd. has tumbled 12%.If the SARS outbreak of 2003 is any guide, things could get even worse. In May of that year, Chinese air passenger traffic fell 71%, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Bernstein Research cited concerns of a repeat outcome when it cut Trip.com’s rating one notch to “market perform” earlier this week. The Nasdaq-listed company, which changed its name from Ctrip.com last year, issued a statement Thursday saying it would refund travelers who’ve been diagnosed, or those in close touch with them.The hope is that, like SARS, the turbulence will eventually pass. For Trip.com, however, the business challenges are bigger than the coronavirus. In recent years, the company has struggled to keep up with competition from digital rivals like Meituan Dianping and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.Few travel companies have benefited more from China’s transition to the world’s biggest source of tourists in 2012. Despite the trade war and Hong Kong’s protests,(3) China’s outbound tourism numbers have continued to rise. According to Euromonitor International, 108.39 million overseas trips were taken last year, a 9.5% gain, after surging 11.7% in 2018. Trip.com now makes up a quarter of its total sales from outbound Chinese visitors, from under 15% five years ago, reckons Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Vey-Sern Ling.But the hotel-booking sector is getting crowded. Meituan Dianping has recently overtaken Trip.com as China’s top site, just five years after the food-delivery giant started dabbling in the business. Meituan now has 47% of China's market, ahead of Trip.com, with 34%, according to TrustData. Now, Meituan is moving further into Trip.com’s territory with luxury hotels, while chains like Marriott International Inc. are pushing for direct booking on their China websites. Alibaba said part of the $13 billion it raised from its Hong Kong listing in November would go toward fliggy.com, its online travel group site.If there’s any lesson to be gleaned from all this, it’s the benefit of diversification. While China’s superapp business model has arched some eyebrows (how can one company possibly provide digital payments, taxis, food delivery, massages and pet grooming?) there’s a decent case to be made for having some crisis-proof subsidiaries. Consider AirAsia Group Bhd, Southeast Asia's most successful budget airline, which is setting up a regional fast food franchise.Plans could already be underway for Trip.com to diversify its investor base, with the company discussing plans to go public in Hong Kong, Bloomberg News reported earlier this month. Here, Alibaba is a successful model. With its second listing, the company is now closer to its Chinese end-users, and Alibaba’s New York-listed stock has soared 14%.The four-month span of the SARS outbreak shows how quickly things can turn around: While China’s growth dipped in the second quarter of 2003, it swiftly resumed in the following months. Given how much more important the Chinese shopper is to the economy now, the damage could be more painful. A 10% fall in discretionary transportation and entertainment could shave 1.2 percentage points from China’s growth domestic product, according to “back of the envelope” estimates by S&P Global Inc. Hong Kong retailers and restaurants, just coming off the pain of last year's protests, were already suffering. For those companies that enjoyed the fast-rising Chinese consumer, it may be time to devise a plan B. (Updates to include China’s measures to suspend travel-agency sales.)(1) Hong Kong, followed by Macau, are the top two destinations of mainland Chinese travelers.To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Murphy Oil (MUR) Earnings Expected to Grow: What to Know Ahead of Next Week's Release
    Zacks

    Murphy Oil (MUR) Earnings Expected to Grow: What to Know Ahead of Next Week's Release

    Murphy Oil (MUR) possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • REGN vs. HZNP: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?
    Zacks

    REGN vs. HZNP: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

    REGN vs. HZNP: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Is Magnolia Oil & Gas Corporation (NYSE:MGY) Trading At A 39% Discount?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Magnolia Oil & Gas Corporation (NYSE:MGY) Trading At A 39% Discount?

    Does the January share price for Magnolia Oil & Gas Corporation (NYSE:MGY) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we...

  • 5 Must-Buy Mid Caps Set to Beat Earnings Estimates Next Week
    Zacks

    5 Must-Buy Mid Caps Set to Beat Earnings Estimates Next Week

    Investment in mid-cap stocks is often recognized as a good portfolio diversification strategy. These stocks combine attractive attributes of both small and large-cap stocks.

  • Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend
    Bloomberg

    Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Hong Kong is missing an opportunity to displace the U.S. as an offshore listing venue for Chinese companies by keeping trading fees too high. Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s $11 billion offering in November showed the potential for the city’s stock exchange to attract U.S.-listed mainland enterprises amid an unsettled trade relationship between the two largest economies. Relatively expensive costs threaten to undermine that appeal.Investors get more for their dollar when they trade on the New York Stock Exchange. In Hong Kong, bid-ask spreads are wider and minimum investment requirements are higher. That increases the chance of so-called slippage, when there is a difference between the expected price of a trade and the level at which it is actually executed. With zero stamp duty and lower minimum trade requirements, the NYSE has a more favorable environment for active investors.Alibaba’s Hong Kong trading volume has slumped since the internet giant made its debut on the local exchange. On Nov. 26, shares valued at the equivalent of about $1.79 billion changed hands. Since mid-December, that figure has dropped to a daily average of about $322 million. The Hong Kong listing has made no dent in Alibaba’s stock trading in New York, where volume has averaged $3.2 billion since late November.To be sure, trading costs are by no means the only factor — or even the main one — in deciding where to buy and sell. To begin with, the U.S. is a more deep and liquid market. It has other advantages, including a more active and developed options market that gives traders more ways to hedge or speculate on stocks. That said, Hong Kong could do a better job of rolling out the welcome mat.Since losing out to New York for Alibaba’s record $25 billion initial public offering in 2014, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. has made a number of rule changes to enhance its viability as a platform for technology startups from China and elsewhere. In April 2018, the exchange amended its provisions to admit companies with dual-class shares. Smartphone maker Xiaomi Corp.  and internet services company Meituan Dianping listed soon after, demonstrating that when HKEX makes smart decisions, the exchange benefits.More U.S.-traded Chinese companies are looking at Hong Kong for potential secondary listings. They include travel services provider Trip.com Group Ltd., formerly known as Ctrip; game and website operator Netease Inc.; web search provider Baidu Inc.; and e-commerce giant JD.com Inc. The way is open for Hong Kong to create a new offshore ecosystem for U.S.-listed Chinese companies seeking better positioning for the mainland while hedging their bets against a renewed deterioration in the U.S.-China relationship after the phase one agreement was signed this month.It makes little sense to squander this opportunity by maintaining trading costs that are a major barrier to entry. The Hong Kong government and the exchange must work together to make dual listing opportunities both beneficial and attractive to companies while encouraging investors to trade here. However, HKEX regulators seem to have their heads in the sand when it comes to reducing fees and the minimum buy-in to entice more companies. That may be a reflection of its monopoly status: Unlike the NYSE, which must compete with Nasdaq, HKEX has no local rival.Reducing fees would lower the barrier to entry for active investors and increase trading volume. As I wrote in September, cutting stamp duty would help improve liquidity and make Hong Kong stocks more attractive to retail and institutional investors. The ripple effect from this would further strengthen Hong Kong’s position as a global financial center. It’s time for the government and exchange to look beyond the immediate impact of reduced revenue and consider the long term.  To contact the author of this story: Ronald W. Chan at chartwellhk@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ronald W. Chan is the founder and CIO of Chartwell Capital in Hong Kong. He is the author of “The Value Investors” and “Behind the Berkshire Hathaway Curtain.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Earnings Preview: Hess (HES) Q4 Earnings Expected to Decline
    Zacks

    Earnings Preview: Hess (HES) Q4 Earnings Expected to Decline

    Hess (HES) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Berry Petroleum (BRY) Moves to Strong Buy: Rationale Behind the Upgrade
    Zacks

    Berry Petroleum (BRY) Moves to Strong Buy: Rationale Behind the Upgrade

    Berry Petroleum (BRY) has been upgraded to a Zacks Rank 1 (Strong Buy), reflecting growing optimism about the company's earnings prospects. This might drive the stock higher in the near term.

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