• Fiat Chrysler asks U.S. court to toss out GM racketeering claims: filing
    Reuters

    Fiat Chrysler asks U.S. court to toss out GM racketeering claims: filing

    Fiat Chrysler's motion to dismiss GM's civil racketeering lawsuit was expected. The company has said GM's lawsuit is baseless and aimed at disrupting the Italian-American automaker's proposed merger with France's Peugeot SA .

  • Fiat Chrysler asks U.S. court to toss out GM racketeering claims - filing
    Reuters

    Fiat Chrysler asks U.S. court to toss out GM racketeering claims - filing

    Fiat Chrysler's motion to dismiss GM's civil racketeering lawsuit was expected. The company has said GM's lawsuit is baseless and aimed at disrupting the Italian-American automaker's proposed merger with France's Peugeot SA .

  • Former top U.S. general Dunford joining Lockheed Martin's board
    Reuters

    Former top U.S. general Dunford joining Lockheed Martin's board

    The former top U.S. military official, General Joseph Dunford, has been elected to the board of Lockheed Martin Corp , the Pentagon's largest weapons supplier, the company said on Friday. Dunford, who served as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2015 to 2019, will join the board of the F-35 fighter jet maker on Feb. 10. Critics of U.S. military spending have long complained of a revolving door between Pentagon leadership and the defense industry.

  • Previewing Tech Sector Earnings
    Zacks

    Previewing Tech Sector Earnings

    Previewing Tech Sector Earnings

  • NextEra Energy Partners (NEP) Q4 Earnings Top, Revenues Miss
    Zacks

    NextEra Energy Partners (NEP) Q4 Earnings Top, Revenues Miss

    NextEra Energy Partners (NEP) Q4 earnings beat estimates, while total revenues lag the same.

  • Chip Stocks To Watch For As The Segment Rallies
    Zacks

    Chip Stocks To Watch For As The Segment Rallies

    Chip Stocks To Watch For As The Segment Rallies

  • Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)
    Zacks

    Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)

    Bear of the Day: Dell Technologies (DELL)

  • Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone
    Zacks

    Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone

    Top Stock Research Reports for Intel, Boeing & Blackstone

  • Why Lockheed (LMT) is Poised to Beat Earnings Estimates Again
    Zacks

    Why Lockheed (LMT) is Poised to Beat Earnings Estimates Again

    Lockheed (LMT) has an impressive earnings surprise history and currently possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely beat in its next quarterly report.

  • Tesla Crosses $100B Ahead of Q4 Earnings: ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    Tesla Crosses $100B Ahead of Q4 Earnings: ETFs in Focus

    Tesla has become the first publicly listed U.S. automaker to cross $100 billion in market valuation ahead of Q4 earnings.

  • Is IBM (IBM) a Great Value Stock Right Now?
    Zacks

    Is IBM (IBM) a Great Value Stock Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • BIG vs. TJX: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?
    Zacks

    BIG vs. TJX: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

    BIG vs. TJX: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • K vs. CPB: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?
    Zacks

    K vs. CPB: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?

    K vs. CPB: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Chevron, Netflix, NextEra, IBM and HCA
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Chevron, Netflix, NextEra, IBM and HCA

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Chevron, Netflix, NextEra, IBM and HCA

  • Will GPU Adoption & EPYC Deal Wins Aid AMD's Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Will GPU Adoption & EPYC Deal Wins Aid AMD's Q4 Earnings?

    Robust adoption of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) graphics cards and EPYC deal wins are expected to have driven top-line growth in fourth-quarter 2019.

  • Will Global Services Unit Aid Boeing's (BA) Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Will Global Services Unit Aid Boeing's (BA) Q4 Earnings?

    Mixed delivery figures do not raise hopes for an optimistic operational performance by Boeing (BA) in Q4 earnings.

  • 3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks: A Smarter Way to Boost Your Retirement Income - January 24, 2020
    Zacks

    3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks: A Smarter Way to Boost Your Retirement Income - January 24, 2020

    The traditional ways to plan for your retirement may mean income can no longer cover expenses post-employment. But what if there was another option that could provide a steady, reliable source of income in your nest egg years?

  • Netflix (NFLX) Looks Good: Stock Adds 7.2% in Session
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Looks Good: Stock Adds 7.2% in Session

    Netflix (NFLX) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 7% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • Webster Financial (WBS) Stock Down 5.3% on Q4 Earnings Miss
    Zacks

    Webster Financial (WBS) Stock Down 5.3% on Q4 Earnings Miss

    While rise in expenses and contraction of net interest margin hurt Webster Financial's (WBS) Q4 earnings, growth in deposit and loan balances provide some support.

  • Intel Can’t Take Off Another Round in Chip Battle
    Bloomberg

    Intel Can’t Take Off Another Round in Chip Battle

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Intel Inc. closed out 2019 learning the hard lesson that making cutting-edge semiconductors is truly difficult.Like a prizefighter who refuses to admit he just hit the mat, the world’s biggest chipmaker is coming out swinging. And it should, because how it gets through 2020 could decide the company’s fate. Once the most advanced supplier of semiconductors, Intel struggled last year to ramp up production of chips that use its latest 14-nanometer process node, “letting customers down,” as CEO Bob Swan said in October. Its full-year results released Thursday showed that revenue climbed 2% and that net income was flat — hiding the fact that Intel dodged a bullet when it wasn’t able to supply enough of its most advanced products when clients needed them most.It tried to offer some reassurance three months ago by noting that it would increase 14-nanometer capacity 25% this year while raising capital spending to nose-bleed levels. To help overcome that slip-up, executives are keen to tell investors how many customers have signed up for its latest offerings, including a chip dubbed Ice Lake and an upgrade to its Comet Lake mobile processor, which use the next-generation 10-nanometer process. In reality, Intel is badly lagging behind both contract manufacturer Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. and South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co. TSMC, for example, started selling its 10-nanometer chip technology in mid-2017 and last year boosted revenue from its more advanced 7-nanometer offerings by more than 200%. When Intel eventually hits 7 nanometers in 2021, it will be almost three years behind.Intel’s rebuttal is that so-called process-node technology isn’t the only thing. It’s right, and clients should look at total system performance to see how all the parts — the processor, memory and controllers — all slot together. No other company in the world can offer the breadth and depth that Intel can.But with Advanced Micro Devices Inc. back in the game after a decade in the wilderness and a raft of chip designers ready to tap TSMC’s technology advantage, Intel would be foolish to rest on the belief that it can stay ahead of the game while lagging behind on technology. It knows this and has committed to speeding up its migration from the pace of a new node every five to seven quarters to as little as four quarters. Yet investors ought to also note that the introduction of a new node compresses margins during the early stages before better yields provide economies of scale later. A quicker timetable won’t allow as much time to enjoy the upside before the next margin crunch comes.Intel’s strategy to offset this squeeze is to tap continued growth in the data-center market. Cloud providers like Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. are among customers for its 14-nanometer Cascade Lake products, while the global 5G rollout is expected to provide a couple of solid growth years. Its Data Center Group accounts for 32.6% of revenue but 46.4%  of operating income, making it Intel’s most lucrative business unit by operating margin.But that business relies on Intel’s ability to churn out leading-edge chips that, even if not equivalent to what TSMC can offer clients, won’t be too far behind. A data center operator might be willing to forgive a single-generation lag, reasoning that the broader platform integration Intel offers can provide the cost-benefit metrics it needs. A two-generation delay is hard to overlook, though. Intel’s size and strength means it won’t be easily knocked out. But it needs to get through this year unscathed if it’s to remain the undisputed heavyweight champ.(Updates with details about Intel’s 10-nanometer offerings in the fourth paragraph.)To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here's Why Campbell Soup (CPB) is an Appropriate Pick Now
    Zacks

    Here's Why Campbell Soup (CPB) is an Appropriate Pick Now

    Campbell Soup (CPB) is benefiting from its portfolio refinement efforts and strong snacks business. Also, it is on track with cost-saving initiatives.

  • Here're 4 Food Stock Treats if You Find TreeHouse Foods Bland
    Zacks

    Here're 4 Food Stock Treats if You Find TreeHouse Foods Bland

    TreeHouse Foods (THS) has been seeing soft sales for a while. Meanwhile, investors can look at four solid food stocks, which carry a solid Zacks Rank and a splendid earnings surprise record.

  • Bank Stock Roundup: Q4 Earnings in Full Swing; RF, CMA, COF Beat Estimates
    Zacks

    Bank Stock Roundup: Q4 Earnings in Full Swing; RF, CMA, COF Beat Estimates

    Banks post decent Q4 results on the back of improving fee income and modest loan demand, while lower interest rates hurt.

  • The Case For General Dynamics Corporation (NYSE:GD): Could It Be A Nice Addition To Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    The Case For General Dynamics Corporation (NYSE:GD): Could It Be A Nice Addition To Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Is General Dynamics Corporation (NYSE:GD) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with...

  • Tech CEOs in Davos Dodge Issues by Warning Audiences About AI
    Bloomberg

    Tech CEOs in Davos Dodge Issues by Warning Audiences About AI

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.Technology’s most influential leaders have a new message: It’s not us you need to worry about -- it’s artificial intelligence.Two years ago big tech embarked on a repentance tour to Davos in response to criticism about the companies’ role in issues such as election interference by Russia-backed groups; spreading misinformation; the distribution of extremist content; antitrust violations; and tax avoidance. Uber Technologies Inc.’s new chief even asked to be regulated.These problems haven’t gone away -- last year tech’s issues were overshadowed by the world’s --- but this time executives warned audiences that AI that must be regulated, rather than the companies themselves.“AI is one of the most profound things we’re working on as humanity. It’s more profound than fire or electricity,” Alphabet Inc. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai said in an interview at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland on Wednesday. Comparing it to international discussions on climate change, he said, “You can’t get safety by having one country or a set of countries working on it. You need a global framework.”The call for standardized rules on AI was echoed by Microsoft Corp. CEO Satya Nadella and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty.“I think the U.S. and China and the EU having a set of principles that governs what this technology can mean in our societies and the world at large is more in need than it was over the last 30 years,” Nadella said.It’s an easy argument to make. Letting companies dictate their own ethics around AI has led to employee protests. Google notably decided to withdraw from Project Maven, a secret government program that used the technology to analyze images from military drones, in 2018 after a backlash. Researchers agree.“We should not put companies in a position of having to decide between ethical principles and bottom line,” said Stefan Heumann, co-director of think tank Stiftung Neue Verantwortung in Berlin. “Instead our political institutions need to set and enforce the rules regarding AI.”The current wave of AI angst is also timely. In a few weeks the EU is set to unveil its plans to legislate the technology, which could include new legally binding requirements for AI developers in “high-risk sectors,” such as health care and transport, according to an early draft obtained by Bloomberg. The new rules could require companies to be transparent about how they build their systems.Warning the business elite about the dangers of AI has meant little time has been spent at Davos on recurring problems, notably a series of revelations about how much privacy users are sacrificing to use tech products. Amazon.com Inc. workers were found to be listening in to people’s conversations via their Alexa digital assistants, Bloomberg reported last year, leading EU regulators to look at more ways to police the technology. In July, Facebook Inc. agreed to pay U.S. regulators $5 billion to resolve the Cambridge Analytica data scandal. And in September Google’s YouTube settled claims that it violated U.S. rules, which ban data collection on children under 13.Read more: Thousands of Amazon Workers Are Listening to What You Tell AlexaPrivacy DebateInstead of apologies over privacy violations, big tech focused on how far it has come in the past few years in terms of looking after personal data.Facebook Vice President Nicola Mendelsohn said in an interview with Bloomberg Television on Friday that the company has rolled out standards similar to Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation in other markets.“Let’s be very clear, we already have regulation, GDPR,” Mendelsohn said in response to a question about the conversations Facebook is having with regulators. “We didn’t just do it in Europe where it was actually regulated. We thought it was a very considered and useful way of thinking about things so we actually rolled a lot of that out around the world as well.”Keith Enright, Google’s chief privacy officer, also spoke at a separate conference in Brussels this week about how the company is working to find ways to minimize the amount of customer data it needs to collect.“We’re right now really focused on doing more with less data,” Enright said at a data-protection conference on Wednesday. “This is counter-intuitive to a lot of people, because the popular narrative is that companies like ours are trying to amass as much data as possible.”Holding on to data that isn’t delivering value for users is “a risk,” he said.But regulators are still devising on new laws to protect user data. The U.S. is working on federal legislation that calls for limits on sharing customer information and, similar to GDPR, require companies get consent from consumers before sharing data with third parties. Facebook, Amazon, Apple Inc. and Microsoft all increased the amount they spent on lobbying in Washington last year, with some of those funds going to pushing industry-friendly privacy bills.And even though tech executives called for AI rules, they still cautioned against regulating too much, too fast. Pichai reminded lawmakers that existing rules may already apply in many cases. Lawmakers “don’t need to start from scratch” he said.\--With assistance from Nate Lanxon and Stephanie Bodoni.To contact the reporters on this story: Amy Thomson in London at athomson6@bloomberg.net;Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Jillian WardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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