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Politicians urge people to buy Australian wine

"After a hard day's work, nothing beats a glass of New Zealand pinot. But next month, we're drinking something a little bit different - because our friends need our help..."

U.S. House Representative Ted Yoho was among a worldwide group of politicians asking people to raise a glass of Australian wine to stand against China.

The group is a global alliance of legislators from 19 countries, across party lines.

"This December we are asking you all to join us in standing against Xi Jinping's authoritarian bullying."

It follows months of deteriorating relations between Australia and China, after Australia called for an international inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus.

Since then, China has suspended imports on not just wine from Australia, but also coal, barley, even lobster.

Just last week China said it will slap down temporary tariffs of up to 200% on wine imported from Australia.

They say they've found evidence of dumping, that Australia lowers the price of its wine to get into the Chinese market.

Australia calls the move unjustified and wine sellers have told Reuters the opposite is true, that their margins are higher in China.

The Inter-Parliamentary Alliance on China, who made the video, includes lawmakers from the European Parliament, to Uganda, to Japan and argues Beijing's rising influence is a threat to democratic values.