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Aerial photos show jumbo jet graveyard of disused British Airways planes grounded by coronavirus

Ross McGuinness
·2-min read
Aerial view of the runway at Kemble airfield where an airplane salvage company has a stock of many craft rendered unviable by the the consequences of Covid 19, October 12 2020. The tarmac is hosting 16 'Jumbos' (Boeing 747s) including the last of BA's fleet G-CIVB which landed here last week.
An aerial view of Kemble airfield, Gloucestershire, where several disused Boeing 747s are on the runway. (SWNS)

These aerial photos show a jumbo jet graveyard filled with disused British Airways planes grounded by the coronavirus pandemic.

The tarmac at Kemble airfield in Gloucestershire is the resting place of 16 Boeing 747s, including the last of BA’s G-CIVB fleet which made their final journey there last week.

The planes have been grounded as a result of the impact on the aviation industry of COVID-19.

The aircraft are in the stock of a salvage company and are waiting to be scrapped.

Watch: BA’s last two 747s make their final journeys

The BA planes sit alongside jets from other airlines such as Corsair and KLM.

Last week, BA’s last two Boeing 747 planes at London Heathrow airport made their final flights, one landing at Kemble, the other at St Athan airfield in Wales.

BA had planned to retire its 747 fleet in 2024 but brought their final flights forward because of coronavirus.

The two planes had flown a combined 104 million miles in their 47 years in service, carrying millions of passengers.

BA’s predecessor, BOAC, operated its first 747 London to New York service in April 1971.

The plane became affectionately known as the “jumbo jet” and was the largest commercial aircraft in the world until the Airbus A380 took to the skies in 2007.

Aerial view of the runway at Kemble airfield where an airplane salvage company has a stock of many craft rendered unviable by the the consequences of Covid 19, October 12 2020. The tarmac is hosting 16 'Jumbos' (Boeing 747s) including the last of BA's fleet G-CIVB which landed here last week.
The last British Airways jumbo jets made their final journeys last week. (SWNS)

At one point, BA operated 57 jumbos and more than 1,500 were produced by Boeing.

On Monday, BA announced its chief executive, Alex Cruz, was stepping down to be replaced by Aer Lingus boss Sean Doyle.

Watch: What is long COVID?

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