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Danish lobby group seeks swift solution to China's threatened pork tariffs

Pork sellers attend to customers at a market in Beijing

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - Denmark's pork industry said it would be hit hard if China restricts imports of European meat, the lobby group Danish Agriculture & Food Council told Reuters on Monday, and called for a solution to be found before July 4.

China on Monday announced an anti-dumping investigation into imported pork and its by-products in response to EU curbs on its electric vehicle exports.

Any Chinese tariffs are not expected in the near future, but provisional tariffs on EU imports of electric vehicles are due to take effect on July 4.

Spain, the EU's biggest pork exporter to China, said on Monday it was working with EU officials to try to avert damaging tariffs.

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The EU's two other biggest exporters of pork to China are the Netherlands and Denmark.

Ulrik Bremholm, chairman of the trade association Danske Slagterier, a unit of lobby group Danish Agriculture & Food Council, urged all parties to consider the implications for jobs, food security and production and to find a solution before July 4.

The Danish pork industry "will be hit incredibly hard by potential Chinese restrictions on European meat," he said.

"As a representative of a major export sector, I would like to emphasise our support for rules-based and free world trade," Bremholm added.

(Reporting by Jacob Gronholt-Pedersen and Louise Rasmussen, editing by Terje Solsvik and Barbara Lewis)