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Here's How Long To Boil Green Beans For Tender, Juicy Results

Green beans on wooden plate
Green beans on wooden plate - Fcafotodigital/Getty Images

With their satisfying crunch and mild, earthy flavors, green beans are a dinnertime staple. While there are many different ways you can cook up this familiar favorite, from sautéing to frying, boiling green beans is one of the most popular. This low-key technique for cooking beans is quick and healthy. But one big drawback is that it's very easy for the beans to become unappetizingly limp and soggy from overcooking.

If you watch your boiling time closely, there's no reason to end up with mushy green beans. For the best results, you should only boil green beans for 4-6 minutes and serve them immediately after cooking. Actual boil times will vary depending on how small you've cut your beans, but this is often the sweet spot for these vibrant veggies. It's just enough time for their snappy nature to soften into the perfect al dente texture. Plus, just like with eggs, green beans will continue cooking for a short while after you remove them from the water, so shorter times are essential to avoid overcooking.

Sticking to the ideal boiling time is a crucial step for perfect green beans. If you want to truly master your technique, here are some other green bean cooking tips to keep in mind.

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Read more: 12 Vegetables And Fruits That Used To Look Very Different

How To Prep Your Green Beans Before The Big Boil

Bowl of cut green beans
Bowl of cut green beans - New Africa/Shutterstock

Before you turn on the stove, you need to do a few things to prep your beans before they boil. For starters, always trim the stem end. The tough, stringy end of these legumes is too tough to eat, so you should always cut or snap that off first. You can toss these ends into the compost or save them with other vegetable scraps to make a homemade veggie stock.

The next step in prepping your beans is to cut them to your desired length. One or two-inch long segments are common, as they're perfectly bite-sized, but the actual length will depend on the recipe you have in mind. Lastly, remember to wash your beans before cooking them. You should always wash fresh produce to get rid of any unsavory residues. Simply rinse your green beans with cold water in a colander before cooking.

How To Use Your Freshly Boiled Legumes

Green bean feta salad
Green bean feta salad - Brycia James/Getty Images

Adding salt until your water tastes like the sea is a good rule of thumb when boiling foods like green beans, as they don't absorb much water. With the fast boiling times for these legumes, that level of seasoning will flavor the beans perfectly without the salt becoming overpowering. Be sure to bring the salted water to a boil before adding the green beans, make sure there's enough water in the pot to cover them.

You can enjoy your boiled green beans however you'd like, although they're tasty with just butter, salt, and pepper. Or, you can make French-style green beans by adding some freshly squeezed lemon juice. A tangy feta and green bean salad is a nice summery side dish at any family get-together. For a Chilean twist, add green beans to your next steak sandwich. Don't be afraid to get creative with how you feature this classic vegetable.

Read the original article on Daily Meal