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Inflation: The supermarket items that have gone up in price the most

See the full list of what is driving inflation

inflation price rises woman buying milk in supermarket
Inflation has dipped but shoppers are still paying more every time they buy groceries. Photograph: Getty (Noel Hendrickson via Getty Images)

UK inflation dropped sharply to 8.7% in April, but there is no great relief in the squeeze on family budgets as food prices remain high.

Food inflation stood at 19.1% in April, a slight decrease from 19.2% in March.

Bread and cereal prices rose by 18.7%, while meat cost 17.2% more than in April 2022 and fish price jumped 14.2%.

Whole milk prices jumped by 26.3%, while olive oil cost 46.4% more than last year. Meanwhile, eggs rose 37% and vegetable prices rose 19.9%. Fruit was 10.8% more expensive.

Rachelle Earwaker senior economist at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, said: “The headline rate of inflation may have fallen but that will offer little comfort to the millions of households struggling with the sky-high cost of living. Falling inflation does not translate to lower prices either – higher costs are now baked in.

Read more: UK inflation falls to 8.7% in April but high food prices persist

“Most concerningly there has been no fall in annual food price inflation, which is running at an eye-watering 19%. The cost of food has been consistently increasing for 18 months, with dire consequences: millions of families on low incomes are going hungry, unable to afford regular, healthy meals. This is not just a crisis right now – without action it will have an impact on our nation’s health long into the future. Are we really ok with this becoming the norm?

“Almost 9 in 10 families on Universal Credit cannot afford basic items like food and clothing. For them, inflation falling back towards the Bank of England’s target doesn’t suddenly make costs manageable. The government must ensure that benefits always cover the cost of essentials – sporadic, short-term support packages are not enough.”

The Office for National Statistics suggests that the annual rate for food and drink in April 2023 is the second highest seen for over 45 years, when the rate in August 1977 was estimated to be 21.9%.

James Smith, research director at the Resolution Foundation, said: “Inflation has finally fallen back into single digits as the energy price shock last spring drops out of the latest annual inflation rate. But the cost of living crisis is evolving not ending – with surging food prices now taking centre stage.

Read more: UK households paying an extra £833 on groceries as food inflation remains high

“Surging food prices are particularly painful for low-income families, three-in-five of whom are already reporting that they are having to cut back on food and other essentials.

Here is much prices have risen over the 12 months to April:

Food price increases – overall 19.1%

Bread and cereals - 19.3%

Meat – 17.2%

Fish – 14.2%

Eggs – 37%

Low-fat milk – 33.5%

Oils and fats – 26.1%

Cheese and curd – 30.6%

Fruit – 10.8%

Pizza and quiche – 11.9%

Vegetables – 19.9%

Jams, marmalades and honey – 17.9%

Butter – 20.1%

Non-alcoholic beverages – 16.5%

Tea – 19.1%

Coffee – 15.3%

Mineral waters, soft drinks and juices – 15.7%

Alcoholic beverages – 7%

Spirits – 6.2%

Wine – 5.7%

Beer – 10%

Tobacco – 11%

Clothing – 7.3%

Garments – 7.5%

Other clothing and clothing accessories – 5.5%

Footwear – 3.9%

Electricity, gas and other fuels – 24.3%

Electricity – 17.3%

Gas – 36.2%

Liquid fuels – (-27.2%)

Solid fuels – 22.6%

Furniture, furnishings and carpets – 8.4%

Furniture and furnishings – 8.3%

Carpets and other floor coverings – 9%

Household textiles – 6.4%

Glassware, tableware and household utensils – 2.8%

Tools and equipment for house and garden – 5.1%

Purchase of vehicles – 3.4%

New cars – 5.9%

Second-hand cars – 1.2%

Motorcycles and bicycles – 0.5%

Transport services – 4.6%

Passenger transport by railway – 5.1%

Passenger transport by road – 4%

Passenger transport by air – 12.6%

Passenger transport by sea and inland waterway – 3.6%

Postal services – 5.7%

Recreational and cultural services – 3.2%

Recreational and sporting services – 4.1%

Museums – 8.1%

Cinemas, theatres and concerts – 0.1%

Books, newspapers and stationery – 11.4%

Books – 18%

Newspapers and periodicals – 12.6%

Misc. printed matter, stationery, drawing materials – 7.1%

Package holidays – 12.7%

Education – 3.2%

Catering services – 9.3%

Restaurants & cafes – 9.4%

Canteens – 4.2%

Accommodation services – 13.7%

Hotels and motels – 14.9%

Personal care – 9.9%

Hairdressing and personal grooming establishments – 5.8%

Appliances and products for personal care – 11%

Overall CPIH – 8.7%

Food and non-alcoholic beverages – 19.1%

Alcoholic beverages and tobacco – 9.1%

Clothing and footwear – 6.8%

Housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels – 12.3%

Furniture, household equipment and maintenance – 7.5%

Health – 7%

Transport – 1.5%

Communication – 7.9%

Education - 3.2%

Restaurant and hotels – 10.2%

Miscellaneous goods and services – 6.8%

Watch: Significant easing of inflation as energy costs stabilise

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