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Singapore Airlines turns Airbus A380 into pop-up restaurant

Chris Johnston
·2-min read
Singapore Airlines A380
Singapore Airlines A380

Jumbo jets may still be grounded around the world following a collapse in air travel, but Singapore Airlines has found a novel use for one of its dormant Airbus A380s – as a pop-up restaurant.

Diners on the plane at Changi airport can choose a cabin class where they will be served meals with two alcoholic drinks as well as other beverages.

The lunch is only available on Oct 24 and 25 and comes with a tour of the aircraft before dining. Customers can also watch in-flight entertainment during their meal.

For would-be passengers missing the in-flight experience but not the trek to the airport, the airline is also selling a range of first- and business-class meals as well as a service whereby a private chef reheats, plates and serves customers in their homes.

Tours of the airline’s training facilities will be available in late November as part of the "Discover Your Singapore Airlines" initiative.

No prices have been revealed.

At a glance | The Airbus A380
At a glance | The Airbus A380

Chief executive Goh Choon Phong said the experiences allow the airline to keep fans and customers entertained while Covid keeps its planes on the tarmac.

Other airlines including Qantas, ANA and Taiwan’s Starlux have launched scenic "flights to nowhere" where passengers circle the airport before landing again. However Singapore has opted not to do so amid concerns over their environmental impact.

Singapore Airlines sunk to a record £626m loss for the three months to June and is making about 20pc of its workforce redundant.

Global lockdowns have hastened the demise of the world’s largest passenger plane, which was once declared to be the saviour of commercial air travel and can seat up to 868 passengers.

In April Lufthansa put six of its 14 A380s out to pasture, while British Airways sent half of its 12-strong fleet to France for mothballing. 

Emirates, the biggest customer for the double-decker Airbus, continues to fly the plane from Dubai to Heathrow, Paris and Guangzhou in China.