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‘World first’ electric Triumph and Morgan models created

Jack Evans
·2-min read

An Oxford-based EV classic car specialist has successfully converted two iconic models to run on electric power.

Electrogenic has finalised battery-powered versions of a 1976 Triumph Stag and a 1957 Morgan 4/4, with the pair now utilising a high-voltage electric motor linked to a battery.

Electric Triumph Stag
The Stag can return up to 150 miles between charges

The Stag’s original 3.0-litre V8 has been removed in favour of a brushless electric motor with 80kW of power and 235Nm of torque, which is sent to the rear wheels via the car’s original four-speed manual gearbox. Thanks to a 37kWh battery, the Stag offers a range of approximately 150 miles.

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The 4/4, meanwhile, is believed to be the first four-wheeled Morgan to be professionally converted to electric power, with the car’s original four-cylinder petrol engine replaced in favour of the same powertrain powering the Stag. It too uses a 37kWh battery pack for an estimated range of 150 miles.

Electric Morgan
The powertrain replaces the original petrol engine

Steve Drummond, director and co-founder of Electrogenic, said: “Converting older cars like these to electric power is about using modern technology to bring out the best characteristics in the cars. For us this means increasing power within the capabilities of the original vehicle, optimising weight distribution and not using too many batteries to keep the handling crisp and precise. Our proprietary electronics integrate the batteries and motor into a seamless system, making the cars as safe as possible.”

Ian Newstead, director and co-founder of Electrogenic, added: “We love the challenge of converting beautiful classic cars with technology that means they will be able to continue to be used guilt-free, even in our cities, for years to come.”

Both the Triumph and Morgan are customer vehicles and have been prepared to their new owners’ exact specifications. Electrogenic is able to deliver a full range of electrification options for its customers, while retaining the look and feel of the original car.

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