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Young drivers delay car repairs to save money

Young drivers are delaying car repairs in an attempt to save money, a new survey suggests.

An RAC poll of 3,102 motorists indicated that 37% of those aged 17-24 are putting off work to mend their vehicles as the cost-of-living crisis bites.

This could lead to “far larger” bills in future as problems escalate, the motoring services company warned.

Some 16% of young people surveyed are delaying major repairs, which could include replacing handbrakes or cracked windscreens.

Minor repairs such as fixing small oil leaks or replacing brake discs are being postponed by 28% of young drivers.

The poll suggested that 14% of drivers of all ages are skipping repairs in a bid to save money, while 9% are having their vehicles serviced less frequently.

RAC spokesman Rod Dennis said: “Putting off vehicle repairs or skipping routine servicing are both false economies, but these figures show just how many drivers, especially younger ones, feel they have to do this to lower their spending in the face of rising prices.

“The fact over a third of young drivers are deliberately delaying getting their vehicles fixed to cut costs is actually a harbinger of future unwelcome – and possibly far larger – garage bills.

“Not getting work to a car done means the chances of it letting a driver down shoots up, making it potentially less safe.”

Mr Dennis expressed hope that the Government “permanently shelves its unpopular idea” of halving the frequency of MOTs from every year to every two years.

Reports emerged in April that then-transport secretary Grant Shapps suggested making the change to save people money.

Mr Dennis said: “As the average age of cars on our roads is getting older due to fewer people trading up to new cars, it looks as though many of them will also be in a poorer overall state of repair, which is bad news for everyone using the roads.

“The MOT is the backstop when it comes to ensuring all vehicles using the roads are roadworthy.”

A Department for Transport spokesperson said: “While we have some of the safest roads in the world, it is vital drivers take responsibility for maintaining their vehicles, ensuring they are safe and roadworthy.”