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FTSE 100 (^FTSE)

FTSE Index - FTSE Index Delayed price. Currency in GBP
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6,941.70-58.38 (-0.83%)
As of 10:33AM BST. Market open.
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Previous close7,000.08
Open7,000.08
Volume0
Day's range6,941.73 - 7,001.27
52-week range5,525.50 - 7,037.70
Avg. volume783,558,629
  • FTSE 100 dips but stays above 7,000 amid rise in pound, Sensex opens in green
    The Independent

    FTSE 100 dips but stays above 7,000 amid rise in pound, Sensex opens in green

    US stocks dragged down from record highs by technology companies

  • Pound touches $1.40 on recovery optimism – live updates
    The Telegraph

    Pound touches $1.40 on recovery optimism – live updates

    UK intervenes in $40bn Nvidia-Arm deal on national security grounds FTSE 100 falls below 7,000 US market tumble from all-time highs dragged by tech Matthew Lynn: The Brexit exodus will fundamentally reshape our economy Sign up here for our daily business briefing newsletter

  • Questor: this buy-to-let lender looks cheap and has scope for further strong gains
    The Telegraph

    Questor: this buy-to-let lender looks cheap and has scope for further strong gains

    A very strong balance sheet, the achievement of a double-digit return on equity in 2020 despite the pandemic and the prospect of substantial dividend growth after this month’s resumption of payments all bode well for OSB, the FTSE 250 bank. We already have a 36.4pc capital gain in the bag, plus dividends, since our study of the stock in November 2018 and, assuming anything like a degree of economic normality, the specialist lender looks capable of providing the ideal combination of further share price gains and dividend growth. OSB specialises in niche sectors of the mortgage market, notably buy-to-let and properties for small businesses. It effectively doubled down on those areas when it acquired Charter Court Financial Services in 2019. As a result investors took fright when the pandemic struck just over a year ago, as they wondered what damage rising unemployment and a housing downturn could do to the balance sheet at a time when net interest margins were under pressure thanks to rock-bottom interest rates and quantitative easing. According to the full-year results published earlier this month, net interest margins did indeed fall in 2020, to 2.19pc from 2.43pc (no small matter on a net loan book of £19.2bn), and the loss ratio jumped to 0.38pc of the loan book from 0.13pc. Some of last year’s legitimate concerns were borne out. In addition, OSB had to take a £20m provision against a potential fraud.