AAL - American Airlines Group Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
27.28
-1.12 (-3.94%)
As of 1:31PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close28.40
Open27.97
Bid27.77 x 2200
Ask27.78 x 1100
Day's range27.15 - 27.99
52-week range24.23 - 37.23
Volume7,554,069
Avg. volume6,976,872
Market cap11.95B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.64
PE ratio (TTM)7.72
EPS (TTM)3.53
Earnings date22 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.40 (1.41%)
Ex-dividend date03 Nov 2019
1y target est36.33
  • Boeing's 737 Max Debacle Helps Airbus Take Off
    Zacks

    Boeing's 737 Max Debacle Helps Airbus Take Off

    Boeing (BA) recorded total sales of only 54 jetliners in 2019 compared with Airbus' 768, per a Bloomberg report.

  • Will 737 MAX Issues Hurt Q4 Earnings of Airline Majors?
    Zacks

    Will 737 MAX Issues Hurt Q4 Earnings of Airline Majors?

    United Airlines (UAL) is likely to have canceled 5,100 flights in November and December due to the grounding of Boeing 737 MAX jets in its fleet.

  • Earnings, Davos — What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Earnings, Davos — What to know in the week ahead

    It is a shortened trading week and investors will be focused on earnings and the World Economic Forum taking place in Davos, Switzerland.

  • Why Trump’s China trade deal could save Boeing
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Trump’s China trade deal could save Boeing

    China "needs to buy" jets from Boeing, trade says

  • American Airlines (AAL) Earnings Expected to Grow: Should You Buy?
    Zacks

    American Airlines (AAL) Earnings Expected to Grow: Should You Buy?

    American Airlines (AAL) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Will American Airlines' (AAL) Q4 Earnings be a Let Down?
    Zacks

    Will American Airlines' (AAL) Q4 Earnings be a Let Down?

    Flight cancellations, thanks to the grounding of Boeing 737 MAX jets in American Airlines' (AAL) fleet, are likely to have dented its Q4 performance.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, American Airlines and Southwest
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, American Airlines and Southwest

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, American Airlines and Southwest

  • Delta Beats Big on Earnings: What To Expect From Remaining Airlines
    Zacks

    Delta Beats Big on Earnings: What To Expect From Remaining Airlines

    Delta's robust earnings this morning has created positive sentiment for the broader airline industry, but we shouldn't get overly optimistic about the remaining earnings because much of the upside was Delta specific

  • American Airlines extends Boeing 737 MAX flight cancellations into June
    Reuters

    American Airlines extends Boeing 737 MAX flight cancellations into June

    American Airlines Group Inc will extend cancellations of Boeing Co 737 MAX flights through June 3 as the grounding threatens to impact a second busy U.S. summer travel season. American, the largest U.S. airline, announced last month it was canceling about 140 flights a day through April 6. Once the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) gives 737 MAX approval to return to service, American will need at least 30 days to prepare the jets and its pilots for commercial flights, airline and union officials have said.

  • Airline Stock Roundup: AAL, JBLU's Q4 Unit Revenue Views Bearish, GOL in Focus
    Zacks

    Airline Stock Roundup: AAL, JBLU's Q4 Unit Revenue Views Bearish, GOL in Focus

    The increase in December load factor, at the likes of Alaska Air Group (ALK) and JetBlue (JBLU), highlights the stellar air-travel demand.

  • American Airlines Stock Down on Bearish Q4 TRASM Outlook
    Zacks

    American Airlines Stock Down on Bearish Q4 TRASM Outlook

    American Airlines (AAL) expects fourth-quarter 2019 unit revenues to have remained flat or increased up to 1% on a year-over-year basis.

  • Difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy: Yahoo U
    Yahoo Finance

    Difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 11 bankruptcy: Yahoo U

    Yahoo Finance's Brian Cheung explains the difference between Chapter 11 and Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

  • Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen
    Zacks

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen

  • Does American Airlines Group Inc.'s (NASDAQ:AAL) CEO Pay Matter?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does American Airlines Group Inc.'s (NASDAQ:AAL) CEO Pay Matter?

    Doug Parker became the CEO of American Airlines Group Inc. (NASDAQ:AAL) in 2013. This analysis aims first to contrast...

  • The Market Timing Secrets No One Talks About - January 09, 2020
    Zacks

    The Market Timing Secrets No One Talks About - January 09, 2020

    Have you ever dreamed of being that one in a million investor who has the talent to perfectly time the markets?

  • 5 Broker-Friendly Stocks in Focus Amid Middle East Tensions
    Zacks

    5 Broker-Friendly Stocks in Focus Amid Middle East Tensions

    It is in the best interest of investors to seek advice from brokers, who are deemed to be experts in the field of investing.

  • Delta CEO to Boeing: 'Don't lose sight of the future' following 737 Max problems
    Yahoo Finance

    Delta CEO to Boeing: 'Don't lose sight of the future' following 737 Max problems

    Delta CEO Ed Bastian says Boeing needs to get the 737 Max back in the air even though Delta doesn't fly the plane because industry needs Boeing to work on future technology and innovation.

  • Bloomberg

    Boeing Called for 737 Max Simulator Training And CAE Was Ready

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co.’s surprise about-face in recommending that 737 Max pilots now complete training in simulators before flying the still-grounded airliner shocked many in the aviation world -- except perhaps one of the leading manufacturers of the devices.Canada’s CAE Inc., anticipating a surge in demand for pilot training, in November said it had begun to make 737 Max full-flight simulators without customer orders in hand, an unusual step in the build-to-order industry. The company believed more training would be needed in the wake of 737 Max crisis and wanted to be in a position to quickly supply airlines with the machines that can cost as much as $20 million apiece, CAE spokeswoman Helene Gagnon said.“We’re kind of happy that we made the decision back in November to do that,” she said.CAE shares rose as much as 4.4% on Wednesday after Boeing’s recommendation for simulator training the day before to trade at $37.38 at 11:54 a.m. in Toronto trading. The gains were the company’s largest since Nov. 13.Weighing roughly as much as a school bus and standing two stories or more in height, the latest generation of flight simulators are a cross between super computers and the world’s most sophisticated gaming platforms.Capsules the size of a small apartment contain near-exact replicas of the cockpit -- from the position of each switch to the feel of the flight controls -- and advanced video systems that display terrain near airports with high fidelity. Massive hydraulic lifts hoist, lower and tilt the simulated cockpit to create the illusion of movement through nearly any phase of a flight.Programming the simulator for snowy weather, for example, can show snow plows at work as pilots perform virtual taxis on the ground. Even passengers walking through a realistic-looking terminal can be seen when a plane is parked at a gate.CAE is the leading manufacturer of full-flight simulators, according to the company. As of mid-November, the company had received 48 orders 737 Max simulators and delivered 23 to airlines through December, Gagnon said. Competitors include L3 Harris Technologies Inc., which declined to comment, and Textron Inc.-owned Tru Simulation + Training Inc. A spokeswoman for the Textron unit didn’t return a message seeking comment.Boeing on Tuesday abandoned its long-held stance that pilots of an older 737 model would only need a short computer course to fly the Max, recommending simulator training before taking flight.Mandating simulator sessions will be costly and could delay airlines being able to add the 737 Max to their schedules.The Federal Aviation Administration and other aviation regulators must still determine the scope and rigor of any additional pilot training needed. But the machines could become a hot commodity as Southwest Airlines Co., American Airlines Group Inc. and United Airlines Holdings Inc. put thousands of 737 pilots through their paces after regulators give final approval to training protocols for the still-grounded jet.Estimates vary, but U.S. airlines own only a few 737 Max flight simulators, and Boeing owns several others. Compare that to more than 80 simulators modeled after the 737 NG family that preceded the Max that are held by airlines, according to an FAA-maintained list.Bloomberg has reported that Boeing is exploring converting the simulators designed for the previous generation of 737s to train pilots on the Max.\--With assistance from Susan Decker.To contact the reporters on this story: Ryan Beene in Washington at rbeene@bloomberg.net;Alan Levin in Washington at alevin24@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Airline Stock Roundup: AAL to be Compensated by BA, ALK's New CFO & More
    Zacks

    Airline Stock Roundup: AAL to be Compensated by BA, ALK's New CFO & More

    American Airlines (AAL) joins Southwest Airlines (LUV) in inking a deal with Boeing pertaining to compensation for losses due to the 737 MAX groundings.

  • Boeing’s Max Crisis Takes Another Costly Turn
    Bloomberg

    Boeing’s Max Crisis Takes Another Costly Turn

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The good news is, Boeing Co. is starting to do the right things. The bad news is, it’s going to be expensive.The airplane maker on Tuesday said it would recommend pilots undergo flight-simulator training on its 737 Max before the embattled plane returns to service, reversing its previous stance that computer-based education would be sufficient. The Max has been grounded since March following the second of two fatal crashes that were triggered by a flight-control software system added to counter the aerodynamic impact of larger, more fuel-efficient engines than those on previous models. The about-face on training amounts to a concession that the Max was in fact fundamentally different than earlier 737s and that pilots weren’t properly informed of or prepared to deal with its features – despite Boeing’s repeated efforts to argue otherwise in the initial certification process and throughout the Max crisis.The New York Times reported that Boeing’s decision to recommend simulator training stemmed from an analysis of tests conducted last month with airline pilots, many of whom failed to follow correct procedures to handle emergencies. The argument for simulator training has gained traction within the Federal Aviation Administration, in part because Boeing and regulators have been rethinking emergency checklists, according to the Wall Street Journal. Given the congressional uproar over the crisis and the extent of the changes to the plane as the grounding drags on, simulator training may have been inevitable. In that regard, it’s hard to give Boeing too much credit for this recommendation more than a year after the first Max crash. It’s a poor replacement for doing the right thing in the first place.It seems like more than a coincidence that this change comes closely on the heels of the ouster of Dennis Muilenburg as Boeing’s CEO. Muilenburg initially blamed the Max crashes on a “chain of events” of which Boeing’s flight-control software system was just one, and more recently was publicly admonished by the FAA for pushing an overly optimistic narrative on the plane’s return that regulators worried was meant to pressure them into acting more quickly. If the decision to recommend simulator training is a sign of the new Boeing, it’s a positive that the company has finally come to terms with the gravity of its mistakes with the Max and is willing to accept the full financial penalty.And make no mistake, this decision will cost Boeing. The company reportedly made a deal with Southwest Airlines Co. to reduce the cost of each Max plane by $1 million if simulator training was required. Southwest ordered 280 Max jets so that alone may be a hit of nearly $300 million. Some of that discounting may already have been captured in an unspecified agreement reached late last year to compensate Southwest for the hit to its profit from the grounding. American Airlines Group Inc. this week said it, too, had reached a settlement with Boeing. But in both cases, the compensation only covers the damage done in 2019 and continued delays into 2020 are going to give airlines fresh ammunition to push for bigger concessions. Should regulators take Boeing’s recommendation and require simulator training – which they almost certainly will – that won’t necessarily delay the ungrounding of the plane but it will complicate its actual return to service. There are only 34 Max simulators currently certified, according to the Times, although Boeing is reportedly looking into modifying simulators for older 737 models. That may force airlines to pace out deliveries of Max models that have been idling in parking lots all this time which, in turn, could potentially hinder Boeing’s efforts to clear the inventory and resume production.For shareholders, Boeing’s willingness to take the costly, if correct path, should be a wake-up call that the good old days of soaring cash flow and billions in share buybacks are coming to an end. The acknowledgement that the Max is different enough from prior models to require simulator training could point to the company making another move it should have made in the first place: designing an entirely new successor to the 737.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • American Airlines starts trialing Google Nest Hubs as translators in its lounges
    TechCrunch

    American Airlines starts trialing Google Nest Hubs as translators in its lounges

    Delta is keynoting CES today and launching a slew of updates to its digital services. Its competitors don't want to be left behind, of course, so it's probably no surprise that American Airlines also made a small but nifty tech announcement today. In partnership with Google, American will start trialing Google Nest Hubs and the Google Assistant interpreter mode in its airport lounges, starting at Los Angeles International Airport this week.

  • Boeing Set to Pay Hefty Compensations to Airline Companies
    Zacks

    Boeing Set to Pay Hefty Compensations to Airline Companies

    Boeing (BA) has put aside $6.1 billion to compensate airliners through a combination of cash, discounts and other benefits, per a report by The Wall Street Journal.

  • Stock Market News for Jan 7, 2020
    Zacks

    Stock Market News for Jan 7, 2020

    U.S. stocks rebounded from Friday's losses on Monday, as investors shrugged off geopolitical tensions arising in the Middle East.

  • Factbox: Boeing's 737 MAX compensation deals with airlines
    Reuters

    Factbox: Boeing's 737 MAX compensation deals with airlines

    Boeing's best-selling plane was grounded in March 2019 after two fatal crashes in which all 346 passengers and crew were killed. There were 387 737 MAX planes being operated by 59 airlines at the time and a backlog of orders worth more than $500 billion at list prices. Aeromexico said on Jan. 6 it had reached a compensation agreement with Boeing over the grounding of the 737 MAX.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more