AMZN - Amazon.com, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
2,410.39
-11.47 (-0.47%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close2,421.86
Open2,404.99
Bid2,404.00 x 900
Ask2,406.00 x 1200
Day's range2,330.00 - 2,413.58
52-week range1,626.03 - 2,525.45
Volume5,056,945
Avg. volume6,076,825
Market cap1.202T
Beta (5Y monthly)1.35
PE ratio (TTM)115.13
EPS (TTM)20.94
Earnings date23 Jul 2020 - 27 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est2,645.67
  • The Glaring Hole in HBO Max: It's Missing From Both Roku and Fire TV. Here's Why.
    Motley Fool

    The Glaring Hole in HBO Max: It's Missing From Both Roku and Fire TV. Here's Why.

    The newest entrant to the streaming wars isn't available in a wide swath of homes across the country.

  • Why Trump will relish a war with Twitter
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Trump will relish a war with Twitter

    Trump is addicted to Twitter, and there's no alternative. But he needs enemies, too.

  • HP crushes earnings estimates on work-from-home PC demand — top exec says 'we are undervalued'
    Yahoo Finance

    HP crushes earnings estimates on work-from-home PC demand — top exec says 'we are undervalued'

    Yahoo Finance catches up with HP's CEO Enrique Lores fresh off its second fiscal quarter earnings report.

  • Amazon has a rare opportunity to snatch up cheap planes and take on FedEx
    Yahoo Finance

    Amazon has a rare opportunity to snatch up cheap planes and take on FedEx

    Cheap planes and a need for more capacity could be a perfect opportunity for Amazon to snatch up new jets for its delivery services.

  • Bloomberg

    Adobe Says ‘Major Issues’ Took Photoshop, Other Apps Offline

    (Bloomberg) -- Adobe Inc., the maker of Photoshop, said some of its applications were knocked offline Wednesday by “major” technical issues.There were four major issues, down from 13 earlier, and 12 minor issues affecting Creative Cloud, Experience Cloud, Adobe Services and the Adobe Experience Platform as of 2 p.m. in New York, the San Jose, California-based company said. Adobe’s engineers were also trying to resolve other potential issues in progress.“We’re working urgently to get back online as soon as possible,” Adobe told users in a tweet. A spokesman said the technical issues aren’t security related.Major public-cloud vendors Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google reported no service issues, so the problems appear to be isolated with the software company. Adobe’s shares declined 1.6% to $370.76. The stock gained 14% this year through Tuesday’s close.Millions of people rely on Adobe’s creative and document apps. The company said its Creative Cloud apps have been downloaded 376 million times, and users opened 250 million PDFs with an Adobe program in the last year. Many businesses use Adobe’s marketing, advertising and analytics tools, which were disrupted by the technical problems.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • HBO Max to Roll-Out Lower Cost Streaming Service in 2021
    Motley Fool

    HBO Max to Roll-Out Lower Cost Streaming Service in 2021

    HBO Max wants to give consumers choice which is why it will roll out an ad-supported version of its streaming service next year.

  • Amazon and Walmart Are All Set to Bounce Back in India
    Motley Fool

    Amazon and Walmart Are All Set to Bounce Back in India

    Restrictions on sales of non-essential items during the COVID-19 lockdown hurt the two e-commerce giants in India.

  • How toilet paper and hand sanitizer may surprisingly save these 3 retailers
    Yahoo Finance

    How toilet paper and hand sanitizer may surprisingly save these 3 retailers

    Post coronavirus it's all about location. Location, Location.

  • Amazon in Talks to Acquire Self-Driving Car Startup Zoox
    Motley Fool

    Amazon in Talks to Acquire Self-Driving Car Startup Zoox

    The company has long been an innovator in artificial intelligence. Now it wants to add additional autonomous vehicle technology to its portfolio.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Will Take Robot Cars to a Whole New Level

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Amazon.com Inc.’s interest in acquiring a self-driving car pioneer is the prime example (pun intended) of how expectations for driverless vehicles have been recalibrated.The e-commerce giant is in advanced talks to buy Zoox Inc. for less than the $3.2 billion at which it was valued in 2018, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. Given the California-based startup’s approach to autonomous cars, its fate is particularly instructive.In a very crowded field, Zoox was practically alone in aiming to build a whole new kind of electric-powered vehicle, and to operate the fleet itself. Peers such as Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo, General Motors Co.’s Cruise unit, Ford Motor Co. and Volkswagen AG’s joint venture Argo AI, and Aurora Innovations Inc. have focused solely on developing the self-driving technology that could subsequently be fitted into vehicles.Zoox wanted to be Tesla Inc., Waymo and Uber Technologies Inc. all rolled into one.Back in 2015, that seemed like an attractive proposition. If the triple threat to the automotive industry was autonomous technology, electric drivetrains and ride-hailing, why not embrace all three? After all, there were expectations that by 2020 robotaxis would ferry you around the world’s metropolises. Capital flowed into self-driving car startups, typified by the $1 billion GM spent acquiring Cruise in 2016.Those dreams, needless to say, have failed to materialize. Companies that had aimed to jump straight to the fourth of five levels of autonomy have quietly downshifted. (The first level of self-driving encompasses driver-assistance functions such as cruise control, and the fifth is full automation.) Bloomberg New Energy Finance doesn’t expect vehicles with Level Four automation to start gaining traction until 2034. Even then, they will likely represent just 831,000 of the 95 million-unit global car market that year.What’s more, the expense of developing, building and operating a fleet of self-driving cars would be considerable. Even deep-pocketed Alphabet and GM have sought outside investment for their efforts. Established carmakers are meanwhile focusing their capital on electric cars, a more imminent threat. And owning and operating a fleet is expensive too. Zoox had a tough sell to investors: In 15 years’ time, it might have been an attractive business.Which brings us to Amazon. Even if robotaxis aren’t coming any time soon, there are alternative applications for autonomous technology that fall squarely in the Seattle-based firm’s wheelhouse, namely, logistics. Given Amazon’s shipping costs are set to hit $90 billion a year, tech from Zoox could help save $20 billion in shipping costs, according to Morgan Stanley analysts. Its solutions could be used across warehousing and distribution. Buying Zoox could take Amazon's other moves in this field — an existing investment in Aurora and experiments with self-driving truck specialist Embark and electric vanmaker Rivian — to a whole new level.Amazon has become the fantasy acquirer for any number of companies seeking a soft landing: theater chains, brick-and-mortar retailers, food deliverers, mobile carriers, real estate brokers, dental suppliers, film studios and plenty more besides.Sometimes, just sometimes, those deals make sense. Zoox is one of them.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Activision Blizzard, Walt Disney, Amazon, Alphabet and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Activision Blizzard, Walt Disney, Amazon, Alphabet and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Activision Blizzard, Walt Disney, Amazon, Alphabet and Microsoft highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Amazon (AMZN) Eyes Zoox to Bolster Self-Driving Initiatives
    Zacks

    Amazon (AMZN) Eyes Zoox to Bolster Self-Driving Initiatives

    Amazon (AMZN) in talks to acquire Zoox in order to strengthen presence in the autonomous driving space.

  • Is Target Stock a Buy?
    Motley Fool

    Is Target Stock a Buy?

    When it comes to the discussion of major retailers, Target (NYSE: TGT) sometimes becomes an afterthought. Particularly with regard to the COVID-19 pandemic, retail analysts have tended to focus on Target's principal competitors, Walmart, Costco, and Amazon. This probably helped Target stock over the past few months as a run on consumer staples helped to drive revenue increases.

  • Amazon's AWS Client Bundesliga Offers New Match Statistics
    Zacks

    Amazon's AWS Client Bundesliga Offers New Match Statistics

    Amazon's (AMZN) AWS customer Bundesliga marks itself the first soccer league to provide real-time game analysis.

  • Amazon Buying Zoox May Save $20 Billion, Put Tesla on Its Heels
    Bloomberg

    Amazon Buying Zoox May Save $20 Billion, Put Tesla on Its Heels

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc.’s talks to buy driverless vehicle startup Zoox Inc. has analysts speculating the deal could save the e-commerce giant tens of billions a year and put auto, parcel and ride-hailing companies on their heels.Shipping costs are one of Amazon’s largest expenses and may reach $90 billion in the coming years, Morgan Stanley’s internet, auto and transport analysts wrote in a report Wednesday. An autonomous offering could save the company more than $20 billion annually, they estimate.“Autonomous technology is a natural extension of Amazon’s efforts to build its own third party logistics network,” Morgan Stanley’s analysts wrote. They see the company being a “clear” competitor to the likes of Tesla Inc. and General Motors Co. and the potential for Amazon to compete in ride-sharing and food delivery. United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp. also “will have to respond to keep up.”Other companies in the automotive and chip industries have also held talks with Zoox about a potential investment, according to people familiar with the matter. At least one other business besides Amazon has offered to buy the company, they added. Zoox is unlikely to sell for less than the more than $1 billion that it has raised, according to the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private negotiations.“Zoox has been receiving interest in a strategic transaction from multiple parties and has been working with Qatalyst Partners to evaluate such interest,” the startup said Tuesday. It declined to comment on Amazon’s interest. A spokeswoman for Amazon declined to comment.Zoox had outsize ambition and financial backing. The startup wanted to build a fully driverless car by this year. However, after a 2018 funding round that valued Zoox at $3.2 billion, the startup’s board voted to oust Chief Executive Officer Tim Kentley-Klay. The executive criticized the move, saying the directors were “optimizing for a little money in hand at the expense of profound progress.”Dow Jones reported that Amazon is in advanced talks to buy Zoox for less than the $3.2 billion valuation from 2018.Amazon is willing to spend heavily to automate its e-commerce business. The online retail giant purchased warehouse robot-maker Kiva Systems Inc. in 2012 for $775 million and now has tens of thousands of robots in warehouses around the world.But paying drivers to deliver packages is still one of the biggest costs in the company’s operation. Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos announced plans for drone delivery in 2013, though they have yet to materialize at scale. Last year, Amazon revealed an experimental delivery robot called Scout in the Seattle area that rolls on sidewalks like a shopping cart.Last year, Amazon invested along with Silicon Valley venture firm Sequoia Capital in self-driving startup Aurora Innovation Inc., a startup led by the former heads of Google’s driverless car project and Tesla’s Autopilot team. Amazon also backed Rivian Automotive Inc., the electric pickup and SUV maker. Those bets left Morgan Stanley’s auto analyst questioning earlier this month whether Tesla’s rich valuation is warranted given the competitive threats the company faces.“We often hear from investors that Tesla could potentially be the Amazon of transportation,” Adam Jonas, who rates Tesla the equivalent of a hold, wrote in a May 17 report. “But what if Amazon is the Amazon of transportation?”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Amazon Literary Partnership Announces 2020 Grant Recipients

    The Amazon Literary Partnership today announced $1 million in grant funding to 66 organizations across the country.

  • 5 Things to Know About Amazon's First Video Game Release
    Motley Fool

    5 Things to Know About Amazon's First Video Game Release

    Like many of its tech industry peers, Amazon sees an opportunity for big bucks in the changing nature of video games. The free-to-play and games-as-a-service models are keeping revenue streams open long after release, and the arrival of cloud gaming may give companies like Amazon the chance to bypass console giant gatekeepers such as Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft. Here's what you should know about Amazon, Crucible, and what comes next.

  • AT&T TV Now Returns to the Roku Platform
    Motley Fool

    AT&T TV Now Returns to the Roku Platform

    AT&T's (NYSE: T) "skinny bundle" live TV streaming service has had a bit of a rough time in recent years. AT&T blamed lapsing promotional subscriptions for the sudden crash, an explanation that turned out to be both true and incomplete: AT&T did indeed lose a lot of promo subscriptions, but part of the problem was that such subscriptions were -- allegedly, at least -- created fraudulently in the first place and assigned to unknowing customers. Now, as first reported by Cord Cutters News, AT&T TV Now is back in action on Roku.

  • Amazon Boosts India Presence With New Jobs Amid Coronavirus
    Zacks

    Amazon Boosts India Presence With New Jobs Amid Coronavirus

    Amazon (AMZN) plans to hire 50,000 temporary workers in India in a bid to meet the growing demand amid COVID-19.

  • Amazon's COVID-19 Spending Could Dwarf Walmart's $900 Million Outlay
    Motley Fool

    Amazon's COVID-19 Spending Could Dwarf Walmart's $900 Million Outlay

    Retail giant Walmart (NYSE: WMT) had a fabulous fiscal first quarter, with sales rising 9%, and online sales up 74%. Probably the biggest revelation from Walmart's report, however, was this: Racking up all those sales in the midst of a pandemic cost Walmart $900 million in cash bonuses and pay raises, safety equipment costs, and expenses related to sanitizing and otherwise making its stores safe to shop in. In a recent earnings call, Walmart CFO Brett Biggs said it was a "reasonable assumption" that Walmart would spend another $900 million on COVID-19-related expenses this quarter as well.

  • The Massive Opportunity of Facebook Shops
    Motley Fool

    The Massive Opportunity of Facebook Shops

    Facebook (NASDAQ: FB) took another step into social commerce last week with the introduction of Facebook Shops. The feature gives small and medium-sized businesses the ability to upload their catalog to Facebook and Instagram, providing shoppers with another way to buy online. The service is free to use, and Facebook will only collect a fee from small businesses that use the Checkout feature it introduced on Instagram last year.

  • 5 Investment Trends to Profit From a Post-Coronavirus World
    Motley Fool

    5 Investment Trends to Profit From a Post-Coronavirus World

    The COVID-19 pandemic is undoubtedly going to change things. The fear of getting an infection in a public place may well change consumer attitudes toward using a car rather than public transport for travel. Examples include the auto parts retailers like O'Reilly Automotive (NASDAQ: ORLY), AutoZone (NYSE: AZO), and Advance Auto Parts (NYSE: AAP).

  • Better Buy: Amazon vs. Lowe's
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Amazon vs. Lowe's

    Is the e-commerce and cloud giant a better overall investment than the resilient home improvement retailer?

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