BA - The Boeing Company

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
321.31
-2.84 (-0.88%)
As of 1:34PM EST. Market open.
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Previous close324.15
Open322.60
Bid321.74 x 1200
Ask321.78 x 1200
Day's range321.13 - 326.60
52-week range319.55 - 446.01
Volume4,487,562
Avg. volume5,723,767
Market cap180.83B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.19
PE ratio (TTM)48.36
EPS (TTM)6.64
Earnings date28 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield8.22 (2.54%)
Ex-dividend date11 Feb 2020
1y target est352.20
  • Why Lockheed Martin isn't worried about China launching tons of spacecrafts
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Lockheed Martin isn't worried about China launching tons of spacecrafts

    Yahoo Finance speaks with Lockheed Martin executive vice president Richard Ambrose about the great space race at the 2020 World Economic Forum.

  • Boeing's 737 Max Debacle Helps Airbus Take Off
    Zacks

    Boeing's 737 Max Debacle Helps Airbus Take Off

    Boeing (BA) recorded total sales of only 54 jetliners in 2019 compared with Airbus' 768, per a Bloomberg report.

  • Boeing plans to stage first flight of 777X plane this week: sources
    Reuters

    Boeing plans to stage first flight of 777X plane this week: sources

    Boeing plans to carry out the first test flight of its delayed 777X airplane later this week, said two people familiar with the matter on Tuesday. A source close to one of the wide-body jet's nine firm customers said the flight would take place on Thursday or Friday at Boeing's commercial base outside Seattle, depending on weather. Boeing could not immediately be reached for comment.

  • Air Niugini delays delivery of four 737 MAX jets until at least 2024
    Reuters

    Air Niugini delays delivery of four 737 MAX jets until at least 2024

    Papua New Guinea carrier Air Niugini has updated its contract with Boeing Co to delay the delivery of its four 737 MAX jets on order until at least 2024, the airline's chief executive said on Tuesday. The carrier had been due to receive its first 737 MAX this year. Air Niugini Chief Executive Alan Milne told Reuters the delay would give the airline more time to complete a broader review of its fleet plans, including a replacement for its smaller Fokker jets.

  • Boeing seeks to borrow $10 billion or more amid 737 MAX crisis: source
    Reuters

    Boeing seeks to borrow $10 billion or more amid 737 MAX crisis: source

    Boeing Co is in talks with banks about borrowing $10 billion or more amid rising costs for the U.S. planemaker after two crashes involving its 737 MAX jetliner, a source told Reuters on Monday. CNBC first reported the news on Monday, citing sources that Boeing has so far secured at least $6 billion from banks and is talking to other lenders for more contributions. A source confirmed the talks to Reuters, but it was still not clear how much Boeing would seek to raise and whether it would pursue the selling of new bonds.

  • Boeing Closes In on $10 Billion Loan From Citi-Led Group
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Closes In on $10 Billion Loan From Citi-Led Group

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. is close to securing a $10 billion loan, bolstering the plane maker’s finances in the midst of a crisis that’s seen its 737 Max jetliners grounded after two crashes, according to people familiar with the matter.The financing could still be increased if demand from investors exceeds the target size, the people said. Commitments are due by the end of this week, said the people, who asked not to be named because the details aren’t public. The loan will have a maturity of two years and will include a delayed-draw structure, in which the borrower can access the funds at a later date, they said.Citigroup Inc. is leading the discussions with lenders, Bloomberg News reported a week ago. CNBC reported earlier on Monday on the deal size.Officials at Boeing and Citigroup declined to comment on the transaction.Pricing on the loan will be based on Boeing’s credit rating -- which is presently at A3 by Moody’s Investors Service. The ratings agency has placed the manufacturer’s senior unsecured debt on review for downgrade, saying it could face a “costly and protracted” recovery and “heightened operational and financial risk.”Fresh funding would help the U.S. plane maker contend with growing financial strain as it reimburses customers, keeps suppliers afloat and maintains about 400 newly built Max that it can’t deliver until global regulators clear the jet to fly. A production halt taking hold this month on the Max, which has been grounded since March, is a sign that its emergence from the crisis will be lengthy.Read more: Boeing Loses Jet-Delivery Crown to Airbus in Record DefeatThe new financing comes on top of $9.5 billion in revolving credit facilities signed last October, which at the time doubled the size of the company’s existing credit lines. Investment-grade companies typically leave their revolvers undrawn to serve as a form of back-up liquidity.The long-term grounding of the Max cost the company its title as the world’s largest plane maker, after the number of jetliners it delivered in 2019 dropped to less than half of Airbus SE’s tally.(Adds details on earlier credit facility from 7th paragraph)\--With assistance from Siddharth Philip and Lisa Lee.To contact the reporter on this story: Jacqueline Poh in London at jpoh39@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Vivianne Rodrigues at vrodrigues3@bloomberg.net, ;Kenneth Wong at kwong11@bloomberg.net, Chris Vellacott, Anthony PalazzoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Embraer studies turboprop to be developed through Boeing venture
    Reuters

    Embraer studies turboprop to be developed through Boeing venture

    Brazilian planemaker Embraer is in the advanced stages of studying the launch of a new turboprop aircraft to be developed through a venture it is planning with Boeing, subject to necessary approvals, a top executive said on Monday. The aircraft would be in the same size range or even larger than the 70-seat ATR-72, a Franco-Italian aircraft that currently dominates the market, Embraer Commercial Aviation Chief Executive John Slattery told Reuters. "It sits in our target market, which we have always been clear is below 150 seats, and will have natural adjacency to the E2 offering," he said, referring to Embraer's family of 80-120-seat regional jets.

  • Boeing seeks to borrow $10 billion or more amid 737 MAX crisis - source
    Reuters

    Boeing seeks to borrow $10 billion or more amid 737 MAX crisis - source

    Boeing Co is in talks with banks about borrowing $10 billion or more amid rising costs for the U.S. planemaker after two crashes involving its 737 MAX jetliner, a source told Reuters on Monday. CNBC first reported https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/20/737-max-crisis-boeing-seeks-to-borrow-10-billion-or-more.html the news on Monday, citing sources that Boeing has so far secured at least $6 billion from banks and is talking to other lenders for more contributions. A source confirmed the talks to Reuters, but it was still not clear how much Boeing would seek to raise and whether it would pursue the selling of new bonds.

  • AerCap CEO warns against panic discounts for Boeing 737 MAX jets
    Reuters

    AerCap CEO warns against panic discounts for Boeing 737 MAX jets

    Owners of Boeing's grounded 737 MAX jet must keep cool heads and avoid offering panic discounts on sale or lease prices to avoid undermining its long-term value, the head of one of the world's largest aircraft lessors Aercap said on Monday. "Discipline and keeping a cool head is vital because if people panic and lease the airplane or sell the airplane at knock-down rates for an extended period of time, it will be harder for the residual value of that asset to recover," Aercap's Aengus Kelly told the Airline Economics aviation finance conference in Dublin. Aercap has 100 Boeing 737 MAX jets on order.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    REFILE-AerCap CEO warns against panic discounts for Boeing 737 MAX jets

    Owners of Boeing's grounded 737 MAX jet must keep cool heads and avoid offering panic discounts on sale or lease prices to avoid undermining its long-term value, the head of one of the world's largest aircraft lessors Aercap said on Monday. "Discipline and keeping a cool head is vital because if people panic and lease the airplane or sell the airplane at knock-down rates for an extended period of time, it will be harder for the residual value of that asset to recover," Aercap's Aengus Kelly told the Airline Economics aviation finance conference in Dublin.

  • Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Tesla, Boeing, Virgin Galactic, Northrop Grumman and Amazon
    Zacks

    Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Tesla, Boeing, Virgin Galactic, Northrop Grumman and Amazon

    Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Tesla, Boeing, Virgin Galactic, Northrop Grumman and Amazon

  • Will 737 MAX Issues Hurt Q4 Earnings of Airline Majors?
    Zacks

    Will 737 MAX Issues Hurt Q4 Earnings of Airline Majors?

    United Airlines (UAL) is likely to have canceled 5,100 flights in November and December due to the grounding of Boeing 737 MAX jets in its fleet.

  • Boeing customer Air Lease says 'damaged' MAX brand should be dropped
    Reuters

    Boeing customer Air Lease says 'damaged' MAX brand should be dropped

    The chairman of major aircraft leasing firm Air Lease , which has 150 of Boeing's grounded 737 MAX jet on order, on Monday called on the U.S. manufacturer to drop the "damaged" MAX brand to avoid it undermining the plane's value. The comments by Steven Udvar-Hazy, one of the founders of the airplane leasing industry which finances around half of the world's passenger fleet, echoes a call by U.S. President Donald Trump in April last year to "rebrand" its 737 MAX jetliner. Boeing said last June it had no plans to change the name of the jet.

  • Bloomberg

    Musk’s SpaceX Steps Toward Crewed Flights in Successful Test

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up here to receive the Davos Diary, a special daily newsletter that will run from Jan. 20-24.Elon Musk’s rocket company passed a crucial safety test Sunday, clearing its last major hurdle to an historic first crewed flight for NASA, possibly in the first half this year.The hardware necessary for the first launch with astronauts will probably be in place by the end of February, Musk said at a press conference with NASA and SpaceX representatives following the test. The “collective wisdom” among his colleagues was that an inaugural flight was possible in the second quarter of 2020, he said.Sunday’s test shows SpaceX can safely abort a mission if something goes wrong after takeoff. It was delayed from the previous day due to poor conditions in the recovery area. Musk described the safety test as “picture perfect,” and congratulated the respective teams on their dedication.“I’m super fired up, this is great,” Musk added. “It appears probable that the first crewed launch could occur in the second quarter.”NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine noted a number of parachute tests are still required prior to a crewed launch. Kathy Lueders, manager of the NASA commercial crew program, noted the “flawless execution” of the abort mission.The Falcon 9 rocket with Crew Dragon spacecraft launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 10:30 a.m. About 84 seconds after liftoff, SpaceX demonstrated Dragon’s ability to eject from the rocket during an emergency.The in-flight abort test included a series of complex maneuvers before Dragon’s parachutes deployed, according to SpaceX’s press kit, and the craft splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean about 10 minutes after liftoff. The Falcon 9 rocket broke up offshore, as planned.Americans have not flown into space aboard a U.S. craft since the shuttle program ended in 2011. Sending astronauts to the space station also is an important step for Musk’s Hawthorne, California-based company. The billionaire aims eventually to transport people to the Moon and Mars.NASA awarded SpaceX and Boeing Co. a combined $6.8 billion in contracts in 2014 to revive America’s ability to fly to the space station without buying seats on Russian Soyuz capsules. Since then, the agency and both companies have suffered delays that have put the program more than two years behind schedule.In December, Boeing’s Starliner failed to dock with the station because of a problem with the mission’s timing software. The Chicago-based company and NASA are investigating, and the agency will decide if Boeing needs to perform a second flight without crew.(Updates with comments from press conference.)To contact the reporters on this story: Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.net;Emily Barrett in New York at ebarrett25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Benjamin Purvis at bpurvis@bloomberg.net, Kevin Miller, James LuddenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Musk’s SpaceX Test Postponed to Sunday Due to High Winds

    (Bloomberg) -- Elon Musk’s rocket company has one last, major hurdle to clear before it attempts an historic first flight of astronauts for NASA: proving it can safely abort a mission if something goes wrong after takeoff.A test of the abort procedure set for Saturday was delayed by 24 hours due to sustained winds and rough seas in the recovery area, SpaceX said on Twitter. It’s now targeting a six-hour window starting at 8 a.m. Eastern time Sunday.A Falcon 9 rocket with Crew Dragon spacecraft is now slated to launch tomorrow from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. About 84 seconds after liftoff, SpaceX plans to demonstrate Dragon’s ability to eject from the rocket during an emergency.The in-flight abort test includes a series of complex maneuvers before Dragon’s parachutes should deploy and the craft splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean about 10 minutes after liftoff. The Falcon 9 rocket is expected to break up offshore, according to SpaceX’s press kit.“You design this with the hopes that you never have to use it, but this is showing that it works in the real world,” said former astronaut Garrett Reisman, former director of space operations at Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and a professor of astronautics at the University of Southern California.The procedure is the final big test before NASA can certify that SpaceX is ready to ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. U.S. Air Force Colonel Bob Behnken and former Marine Corps test pilot Doug Hurley will be Dragon’s first passengers.“There’s a lot riding on this,” said Reisman, who remains an adviser to SpaceX.Americans have not flown into space aboard a U.S. craft since the shuttle program ended in 2011. Sending astronauts to the space station also is an important step for Musk’s Hawthorne, California-based company. The billionaire chief executive officer aims eventually to transport people to the Moon and Mars.Read more: Boeing and SpaceX Are Racing to Bring Astronauts, Then Tourists, to Space“This is the culmination of years of work,” Benji Reed, SpaceX’s director of crew mission management, said during a pre-launch press conference with NASA on Friday.NASA awarded SpaceX and Boeing Co. a combined $6.8 billion in contracts in September 2014 to revive America’s ability to fly to the space station without buying seats on Russian Soyuz capsules. Since then, the agency and both companies have suffered delays that have put the program more than two years behind schedule.In December, Boeing’s Starliner failed to dock with the station because of a problem with the mission’s timing software. The Chicago-based company and NASA are investigating, and the agency will decide if Boeing needs to perform a second flight without crew.SpaceX’s Dragon capsule successfully docked with the station in March as part of its Demo-1 test.(Updates with test moved to Sunday.)To contact the reporter on this story: Dana Hull in San Francisco at dhull12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Andrew DavisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    New Software Flaw Could Further Delay Boeing’s 737 Max

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. has identified a new software flaw in the grounded 737 Max that will require additional work, possibly further delaying the plane’s return to service.The company alerted the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and is notifying customers and its suppliers, it said in an emailed statement. Boeing’s best-selling jet was grounded on March 13 after two fatal crashes involving a flight-control system.The issue involves how software on the plane checks itself to ensure it’s receiving valid data, said a person familiar with the issue who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly about it. It occurs when the system is initially starting up, the person said.“We are making necessary updates and working with the FAA on submission of this change, and keeping our customers and suppliers informed,” Boeing said in its statement. “Our highest priority is ensuring the 737 MAX is safe and meets all regulatory requirements before it returns to service.”The FAA didn’t comment directly on the latest issue to arise on the problem-plagued plane. “We continue to work with other international aviation safety regulators to review the proposed changes to the aircraft,” the agency said in an emailed statement. “Our first priority is safety, and we have set no time-frame for when the work will be completed.”The 737 Max is costing the plane-maker billions of dollars in losses. The software problem was discovered during the final validation review process of the updates being installed on the plane, the person said.It’s unclear how time-consuming the repair will be. Software systems on aircraft require a far higher degree of reliability and checks before approval compared to consumer products. But the issue could be relatively narrow and therefore not nearly as complex as other work on the software.News of the flaw sent Boeing shares down as far as $323, less than $3 from their closing low after the second Max crash. The stock closed down 2.3% in New York at $324.15, the day’s biggest loser on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Boeing’s long-term issuer default rating was downgraded by Fitch to A- from A.The discovery has already pushed Boeing’s work back by at least a week, said another person familiar with the matter who also wasn’t authorized to speak about it. It’s unclear how much longer it will take to complete fixes, the person said.The issue is in the plane’s flight-control computer software. It was confined to how it performs validation checks during startup and doesn’t involve its function during flight, the people said.The problem came to light when the latest version of the software was loaded onto an actual aircraft, according to one of the people. While it has been tested on planes in flight, most of the software reviews have occurred in a special simulator used by engineers on the ground.Airlines have already built months of delay into their schedules to resume flying the plane, so it’s possible the software work won’t require additional changes. Southwest Airlines Co., American Airlines Group Inc. and United Airlines Holdings Inc. have said they won’t fly the plane again until June. “Boeing has made us aware of the issue but it’s too early to provide any indication regarding potential impact to timing” of the plane’s return to service, said Brandy King, a Southwest spokeswoman.Carriers have said they’ll need to adopt new pilot training and to work on planes to prepare them for service once the grounding is lifted by the FAA.Boeing announced on Jan. 7 that it will recommend pilots undergo additional simulator training on the Max, a reversal of their long-held view that crews qualified on other 737 models only needed computer-based instruction. That action makes it more likely the FAA and other nations will require the additional training.The crash of a Lion Air 737 Max on Oct. 29, 2018, and an Ethiopian Airlines plane on March 10 both occurred after a system known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System repeatedly pushed the planes into dives. Pilots in both cases were able to temporarily maintain control, but eventually the jets entered steep dives and crashed.Boeing has been working for more than a year on fixing software to ensure that MCAS is safe. The process has been bumpy at times as new glitches arose and tension flared with regulators.During the process of assessing the plane last year, Boeing discovered another issue and had to redesign its flight-control computers. The reworking of that software has been one of the reasons that the repairs have taken so long.A Boeing audit of the aircraft at the end of last year also discovered that wiring on the plane was potentially vulnerable to short-circuits that could trigger flight-control problems. That will require moving some wiring in the plane.(Updates with details about issue, background starting in third paragraph)\--With assistance from Justin Bachman.To contact the reporters on this story: Alan Levin in Washington at alevin24@bloomberg.net;Mary Schlangenstein in Dallas at maryc.s@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Ros KrasnyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Boeing addresses new 737 MAX software issue that could keep plane grounded longer
    Reuters

    Boeing addresses new 737 MAX software issue that could keep plane grounded longer

    Boeing Co said on Friday it is addressing a new software issue discovered in Iowa last weekend during a technical review of the proposed update to the grounded Boeing 737 MAX, a development that could further delay the plane's return to service. "We are making necessary updates," Boeing said in a statement. The monitor check is prompted by a software command at airplane or system power up, and will set the appropriate indication if maintenance is required, company officials added.

  • Virgin Galactic Stock Takes Off Before SpaceX and Blue Origin
    Zacks

    Virgin Galactic Stock Takes Off Before SpaceX and Blue Origin

    Exciting milestones are being achieved in space travel rocket technology, attracting early investors and paying customers.

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