COTY - Coty Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
10.54
-0.17 (-1.59%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous close10.71
Open10.73
Bid0.00 x 2200
Ask0.00 x 1000
Day's range10.45 - 10.85
52-week range7.06 - 14.14
Volume5,452,507
Avg. volume5,009,827
Market cap7.988B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.68
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-4.95
Earnings date04 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.50 (4.67%)
Ex-dividend date14 Nov 2019
1y target est12.62
  • Business Wire

    Coty Inc. Appoints Kristin Blazewicz as Chief Legal Officer and a Member of the Executive Committee

    Coty Inc. Appoints Kristin Blazewicz as Chief Legal Officer and a Member of the Executive Committee

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  • Coty Enters Oversold Territory
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    Coty Enters Oversold Territory

    Coty has been on a bit of a cold streak lately, but there might be light at the end of the tunnel for this overlooked stock.

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  • Business Wire

    Coty and Kylie Jenner Commence Strategic Partnership

    Coty and Kylie Jenner Commence Strategic Partnership

  • Cosmetics Industry Outlook Glows on Travel Retail, High Demand
    Zacks

    Cosmetics Industry Outlook Glows on Travel Retail, High Demand

    Cosmetics Industry Outlook Glows on Travel Retail, High Demand

  • Bloomberg

    How Instagram Changed the Way We Shop

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- On Oct. 6, 2010 — the first year of the decade now drawing to a close — the following headline appeared above a modest 445-word article on a tech-industry website: “Instagram Launches With the Hope of Igniting Communication Through Images.”It’s an almost comically quaint description of exactly what the company has done over the past nine years. On its way to amassing more than a billion users, Instagram has become many things: a joyful storehouse of family photos, a sledgehammer for celebrity tabloid culture, a shadowy abyss of teen bullying. Oh, and it has also become the most powerful force in shaping commerce this side of Amazon.com Inc.The smartphone app has notably served as a platform for new forms of consumer marketing. But its influence on spending is far more profound. Because everyone now lives their lives on camera, Instagram has played a crucial role in altering both the look and nature of products people buy and the physical spaces where they shop.Certain items were elevated to the must-have list this decade because they were shareable — that is, they photographed especially well or had a flair of whimsy that racked up the likes and comments. So the Ugly Christmas Sweater went from ironic joke to something Walmart Inc. had to stock in droves, while matching family pajamas invaded department stores.Product designers and merchants have gotten wise to this dynamic and have responded in kind. They brought shoppers pool floats shaped like swans and floppy sun hats with cursive kiss-offs like “Do Not Disturb.” They served up eye-catching rainbow bagels, Unicorn Frappuccinos and latte art. They scored with kids’ games such as Pie Face that were perfect for video snippets.“Bride Tribe” tank tops. Mermaid toast. “Live Laugh Love” wall art. It is doubtful any of these things would even exist if not for Instagram.In some cases, whole product categories have benefited from the photo-centric world that Instagram has created. The beauty business had several booming years this decade, powered by trends such as contouring and strobing that made women feel duck-face-ready. Sales of houseplants skyrocketed as Millennials outfitted their homes with fiddle-leaf figs that lent an artful flourish to photos.And then there are the stores themselves — if that’s still the correct term in the Instagram era. Retailers have created spaces that are alluring sets for photos, such as Tiffany & Co.’s addition of a robin’s-egg blue café to its Manhattan flagship and Canada Goose’s “cold room” sprinkled with real snow. Concepts like Museum of Ice Cream and Rosé Mansion aren’t so much stores as gallery-museum-commerce crossbreeds built on the back of Instagram.Meanwhile, restaurateurs have adapted the lighting in their dining rooms to be conducive to photos, knowing diners’ pictures are among their most powerful marketing tools. Splashy lettering, loud wallpaper, neon signs — these have become the default aesthetic of eateries looking to nab a spot in Instagram feeds.Restaurants are just one component of the so-called “experience economy,” a broader category of consumer spending that has been utterly upended by Instagram. The vacation-photo arms race has led to certain picturesque landmarks being choked by visitors and public lands being degraded. Hotels are also being forced to adapt. Industry giant Marriott International Inc., for example, debuted in 2014 a chain called the Moxy, where guests can opt to have their tiny rooms festooned with photo-friendly inflatable flamingos.Perhaps Instagram’s most peculiar commercial influence has been its role in creating entirely new spending occasions, particularly around life milestones. Maternity photo shoots have become commonplace; so have birth and newborn photo shoots. Same for “Trash the dress” and home-buying photo shoots. Some of these rituals started becoming trendy before Instagram’s rise, but it is the app that has cemented them as an ordinary thing to drop hundreds (or thousands) of dollars on.Relatedly, there now exists a weird species of consumer goods that no one needed before they revealed big news via a visual medium. Search Etsy for “pregnancy announcement props,” and you’ll find thousands of items: chalkboard-style signs, pacifiers and dog outfits emblazoned with baby announcements. You’ll find similar props to herald engagements, gender reveals and birthdays by photo.All of this is before contemplating what an essential tool Instagram has become for brand advertising. So-called influencers — a class that includes both Hollywood actresses and suburban moms with fewer than 10,000 followers — have perfected the art of hawking everything from fashion to protein drinks to tampons to credit-card rewards programs to their audiences in exchange for fees or free gear.In a $600 million testament to Instagram’s power as a marketing platform, beauty industry giant Coty Inc. took a majority stake this year in Kylie Cosmetics, the makeup brand that Kardashian clan member Kylie Jenner had made a hot seller largely thanks to clever promotion on the app. Fast-growing digital upstarts such as Fashion Nova and Revolve Clothing provide additional powerful examples of Instagram’s ability to put a brand on the map.  Instagram’s impact on shopping in the 2010s isn’t as easily quantified as that of Amazon. The online retailer’s transformative role can be seen in its estimated 38% share of the U.S. e-commerce market, a market value that briefly touched $1 trillion and CEO Jeff Bezos’s No. 1 or No. 2 spot on Bloomberg’s Billionaire’s Index.What Instagram did is change consumer culture. It turned shoppers into a performative swarm of shutterbugs presenting Clarendon-filtered (or maybe Juno-filtered?) versions of themselves and their surroundings to their followers. It changed not only how things are bought and sold, but why. When period-piece movies are someday made about the 2010s, the aesthetics used to evoke this decade— all-white kitchens, neon-colored foods, major sleeves — will be the ones that sparkled in Instagram’s onscreen world. Real life never looked quite so glossy.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Will Coty (COTY) Continue Its Impressive Run in the New Year?
    Zacks

    Will Coty (COTY) Continue Its Impressive Run in the New Year?

    Coty's (COTY) solid brand performance, innovations and consumer demand in the Luxury segment might help it retain a strong run in 2020.

  • Business Wire

    Coty Inc Appoints Pascal Baltussen as Chief Global Chief Procurement Officer, a Member of the Executive Committee, and Further Strengthens Its Leadership

    Coty Inc Appoints Pascal Baltussen as Chief Global Chief Procurement Officer, a Member of the Executive Committee

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    Target is the Yahoo Finance 2019 Company of the Year

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  • Why Is Coty (COTY) Down 9.5% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Coty (COTY) Down 9.5% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Coty (COTY) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • What Kylie Jenner's $600M Coty deal says about the beauty industry
    Yahoo Finance

    What Kylie Jenner's $600M Coty deal says about the beauty industry

    Kylie Jenner sold a majority stake of her business to beauty conglomerate Coty. It's a hint of an industry that's pivoting toward celebrity branding and social media marketing.

  • Coty Up More Than 35% in 3 Months, Luxury Unit a Key Driver
    Zacks

    Coty Up More Than 35% in 3 Months, Luxury Unit a Key Driver

    Coty (COTY) gains from strength in its Luxury business. However, challenges in the Consumer Beauty unit persist.

  • Kylie Jenner Is Keeping Up With the Billionaires
    Bloomberg

    Kylie Jenner Is Keeping Up With the Billionaires

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Coty Inc. just turned into Koty Inc.The American beauty group controlled by Germany’s billionaire Reimann family has agreed to pay $600 million for a majority stake in the cosmetics brand founded by Kylie Jenner, the youngest member of the Kardashian-Jenner clan. The deal, in which Coty will acquire a 51% stake, values Jenner’s Kylie Cosmetics business at about $1.2 billion, not bad for the line of lip kits the reality TV star created when still a teenager.You can see why Coty is paying up for a piece of the “Konsumer” action. Jenner, with 270 million social media followers is at the vanguard of the celebrity-influencer beauty industry, where company founders engage their fans via Instagram and YouTube and turn them into customers. Jenner — alongside other new media stars such as pop singer Rihanna, who’s partnered with LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE, and the makeup artist Huda Kattan — is reshaping the beauty industry. Traditional cosmetics houses need to find ways to keep up. The mass beauty market, in which Coty has brands such as CoverGirl and MaxFactor, has been hit hard by the celebrity competition.Coty’s deal values Kylie Cosmetics at 6.7 times the last 12 months’ revenue. That compares with the 3.6 times multiple paid by Sweden’s EQT Partners for Nestle Skin Health, a brand catering for a slightly older demographic. It seems contouring for millennials is twice as valuable as hiding crow’s feet.Jenner’s company sells only make-up and skincare products currently; Coty will license it fragrances and nail merchandise too. If the new parent can broaden Kylie’s appeal into everything from false eyelashes to gel nail varnish, and pump them through its global distribution network, then it has a chance of bolstering revenue and squeezing value from the deal price. The business is already growing quickly and has an Ebitda margin of more than 25%.The danger of buying a “name” brand is that fashion is fickle. Coty’s purchase assumes that Kylie will keep inspiring young women to highlight their cheek bones and plump their lips. Yet what if she falls from favor with her young followers, who move onto the next Instagram or TikTok sensation. Already we may be past peak Kardashian, with the family’s TV show now into its 17th series.Coty is eager to stress that this is a partnership, and that Jenner will remain heavily involved. But operating inside a behemoth is very different to being an entrepreneurial startup.Let’s not forget the fate of the celebrity fragrance boom that emerged in the 2000s. These products are waning in popularity as millennials demand more personalized and artisanal scents. Coty itself has been moving away from some traditional collaborations, for example stopping producing perfumes for Jennifer Lopez, Lady Gaga and Celine Dion — although it still has Katy Perry in its stable.Yet perfume tie-ups were for the analogue age; capturing a Kardashian is for the digital era. Investors will hope that doesn’t also mean an acceleration of the process of falling out of fashion.\--With assistance from Chris Hughes.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coty takes $600 million bet on reality star Kylie Jenner's beauty brands
    Reuters

    Coty takes $600 million bet on reality star Kylie Jenner's beauty brands

    One of the cosmetics world's older names, Coty is seeking to revitalize sales on the back of its broad global distribution and is banking on Jenner's more than 270 million social media followers to attract a younger audience. Jenner, 22, the youngest sibling of the wildly popular Kardashian-Jenner clan, a household name a decade after their reality TV show "Keeping up with the Kardashians" became a smash hit, started her make up line with lipstick and lip liner kits in 2015.

  • Business Wire

    Coty and Kylie Jenner Announce Strategic Partnership to Expand Beauty Brands Globally

    Coty Inc. (COTY) and Kylie Jenner announced today that they have entered into a long-term strategic partnership in order to jointly build and further develop Kylie’s existing beauty business into a global powerhouse brand. Together, Coty and Kylie will set and lead the strategic direction of the partnership, focusing on global expansion and entry into new beauty categories. Kylie and her team will continue to lead all creative efforts in terms of product and communications initiatives, building on her unrivalled global reach capabilities through social media.

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