ED - Consolidated Edison, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
92.22
-0.83 (-0.89%)
At close: 4:05PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close93.05
Open92.85
Bid92.52 x 800
Ask92.52 x 800
Day's range91.93 - 92.98
52-week range73.30 - 94.97
Volume1,322,788
Avg. volume1,550,623
Market cap30.63B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.18
PE ratio (TTM)21.98
EPS (TTM)4.20
Earnings date30 Oct 2019 - 4 Nov 2019
Forward dividend & yield2.96 (3.18%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-13
1y target est89.47
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Should Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a...

  • Did You Miss Consolidated Edison's (NYSE:ED) 64% Share Price Gain?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did You Miss Consolidated Edison's (NYSE:ED) 64% Share Price Gain?

    Stock pickers are generally looking for stocks that will outperform the broader market. And in our experience, buying...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    U.S. utilities file legal challenge to Trump power plant rule

    Con Edison and eight other U.S. utilities mostly from Democratic-led states have filed a legal challenge to the Trump administration's plan to cut carbon emissions from power plants, which replaces a much tougher Obama-era rule. The New York-based power company said in a statement on Monday that the Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule undermines efforts already under way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by investing in renewable energy, electric vehicle infrastructure and energy efficiency and other clean technologies.

  • Is Consolidated Edison, Inc.'s (NYSE:ED) P/E Ratio Really That Good?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Consolidated Edison, Inc.'s (NYSE:ED) P/E Ratio Really That Good?

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll show...

  • Con Ed (ED) Up 3.5% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
    Zacks

    Con Ed (ED) Up 3.5% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

    Con Ed (ED) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Is Consolidated Edison (NYSE:ED) A Risky Investment?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Consolidated Edison (NYSE:ED) A Risky Investment?

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to...

  • Consolidated Edison (ED) Q2 Earnings Miss, Revenues Up Y/Y
    Zacks

    Consolidated Edison (ED) Q2 Earnings Miss, Revenues Up Y/Y

    Consolidated Edison's (ED) total operating expenses in the second quarter rise 1.1% year over year to $2,286 million.

  • Consolidated Edison (ED) Lags Q2 Earnings Estimates
    Zacks

    Consolidated Edison (ED) Lags Q2 Earnings Estimates

    Con Ed (ED) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -3.33% and 2.77%, respectively, for the quarter ended June 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • This High-Yield Dividend Stock Just Keeps Getting Better
    Motley Fool

    This High-Yield Dividend Stock Just Keeps Getting Better

    Crestwood Equity Partners' fast-growing cash flow sets it up to continue rewarding investors.

  • Consolidated Edison (ED) to Post Q2 Earnings: What's in Store?
    Zacks

    Consolidated Edison (ED) to Post Q2 Earnings: What's in Store?

    Lower bill expectation for Consolidated Edison's (ED) residential customer is likely to hurt the company's Q2 revenues and earnings.

  • Earnings Preview: Consolidated Edison (ED) Q2 Earnings Expected to Decline
    Zacks

    Earnings Preview: Consolidated Edison (ED) Q2 Earnings Expected to Decline

    Con Ed (ED) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • How Many Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED) Shares Do Institutions Own?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Many Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED) Shares Do Institutions Own?

    If you want to know who really controls Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE:ED), then you'll have to look at the makeup of...

  • De Blasio’s ConEd Threat Is a Sign of What’s to Come
    Bloomberg

    De Blasio’s ConEd Threat Is a Sign of What’s to Come

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- On reflection, New York Mayor Bill De Blasio didn’t choose the best day to spitball about a government takeover of Consolidated Edison Inc.’s grid. Hours after he made those comments on TV, some New Yorkers were emerging from long-delayed subway trains to find their neighborhoods transformed into a dystopian Venice, light on gondolas but heavy on garbage, as the city’s sewers struggled to cope with heavy rains.Recent blackouts, including during the weekend’s heatwave, have put ConEd in the mayor’s crosshairs, and things sure have escalated quickly. Raising the prospect of effective municipalization of the company’s main asset is akin to threatening a nuclear strike – and just as likely, given the not-obvious benefits of having New York’s grid run from City Hall.Perhaps more consequential, given ConEd is regulated at the state level, is the parallel displeasure of Governor Andrew Cuomo. ConEd is in the middle of one of its periodic rate-setting procedures, essentially where it makes a case to regulators to be allowed to raise bills to pay for capital spending and the return its investors earn on that. As it stands, regulators have recommended less-generous terms than the company wanted for the New York City utility, which provides the vast majority of its income. ConEd sought a financing structure of 50% equity and an allowed return on that equity of 9.75%. Regulators have instead preliminarily recommended 47.3% equity and a return of 8.3% – small tweaks, seemingly, but enough to drop the implied net income by roughly a fifth, all else equal.With those recommendations made in late May, the market has priced this in to some degree already. Where the blackouts and subsequent political ire could potentially come into play is in the negotiations this summer over where those numbers settle. It could also prompt greater scrutiny of how the utility is allocating its budget with regards to updating and replacing older equipment. Even if staff on the Public Service Commission aren’t inclined to take their cues from the latest news cycle, we all tend to take notice when our boss is mad.For investors, such considerations matter especially because ConEd’s stock trades close to the all-time high it hit a month ago. ConEd has undergone a big re-rating upward over the past five years, jumping from 12 times forward earnings to almost 20 times, overtaking the broader regulated utilities sector. That performance acts as a headwind to ConEd’s regulated return due to the formula used by the PSC in setting it (a higher multiple essentially reads as a lower rate of return demanded by investors). The bigger issue, however, is that, as with any stock, a higher multiple leaves little room for error. Greg Gordon, who covers utilities for Evercore ISI, noted in a recent report that, even assuming the allowed return comes in above the PSC’s recommendation, his model implies the company needing to issue $2.6 billion of new equity – about 9% of the current market cap – over the next two years if it wants to protect its current credit rating. In part, that is a result of ConEd’s decision to buy Sempra Energy’s California renewable-energy assets late last year – just before they got mired in the bankruptcy of PG&E Corp.The latter is also currently facing calls by politicians in one of its big urban markets, San Francisco, to take over their grid. That situation is clearly an acute crisis compared to what’s been happening in New York, and yet there are also good reasons to be wary of thinking municipalization is a silver bullet there (see this).Nonetheless, as my colleague Mark Chediak points out, several cities across the U.S. have now raised the prospect with a greater or lesser degree of seriousness. Besides politicians letting off steam, other factors may be fueling such talk. In part, it reflects the flatlining of electricity demand over the past decade or so, which has raised questions about how power is paid for and led some prominent companies to break away from their local grid, or attempt to. It is also a function of technology, as notions of what may be possible outside of the traditional regulated utility model expand. Indeed, Cuomo’s own Reforming the Energy Vision strategy for the state’s power sector reflects this. (Disclosure: My wife runs a company developing a distributed energy platform in New York.) There is also the issue of climate change and the balkanized response to it across the U.S. Patchwork policy is inevitable in America’s federal system, especially as utilities are regulated mostly by the states. This tendency is given added impetus by the current federal administration preferring to ignore the problem. Individual locales don’t necessarily have that luxury.While it takes a leap to pin this or that extreme weather event specifically on climate change, the West Coast’s wildfires and the East Coast’s heatwave and heavy rains unequivocally tell us one thing. With such events due to occur more frequently as a result of climate change, it is becoming abundantly clear that our 20th-century infrastructure isn’t built to handle it. Don’t expect the battle over how we address that, who pays and gets compensated for it, to let up.To contact the author of this story: Liam Denning at ldenning1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Gongloff at mgongloff1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Liam Denning is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering energy, mining and commodities. He previously was editor of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column and wrote for the Financial Times' Lex column. He was also an investment banker.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • These Utilities Have Increased Dividends for 45+ Years
    Market Realist

    These Utilities Have Increased Dividends for 45+ Years

    Investors take shelter under relatively safe utility stocks amid market turmoil due to their stable dividend payment abilities.

  • Companies to Watch: AT&T and IBM team up, PG&E makes repairs, ConEd explains NYC blackout
    Yahoo Finance

    Companies to Watch: AT&T and IBM team up, PG&E makes repairs, ConEd explains NYC blackout

    IBM, AT&T, ConEd, Charles Schwab and Bayer are the companies to watch.

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