EZJ.L - easyJet plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,065.00
-93.60 (-8.08%)
As of 3:10PM GMT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1,213.00
Open1,120.00
Bid1,064.50 x 0
Ask1,065.50 x 0
Day's range1,057.50 - 1,120.00
52-week range840.00 - 1,570.00
Volume3,049,928
Avg. volume2,036,443
Market cap4.228B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.01
PE ratio (TTM)12.13
EPS (TTM)87.80
Earnings date14 May 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.44 (3.62%)
Ex-dividend date27 Feb 2020
1y target est1,479.74
  • What to Watch: Topps Tiles and WPP shares crash, virus spooks European markets
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Topps Tiles and WPP shares crash, virus spooks European markets

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  • Global stock turmoil deepens as investors panic over coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Global stock turmoil deepens as investors panic over coronavirus

    Investors are assessing the longer-term impact of the spread of coronavirus on trade, supply chains, and consumer confidence.

  • Suddenly, That Beach Holiday Has Lost Its Appeal
    Bloomberg

    Suddenly, That Beach Holiday Has Lost Its Appeal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The deadly coronavirus has spread to European holiday destinations. That’s of huge concern to a travel industry that will soon be gearing up for its peak summer season.When the outbreak emerged in China, worries centered on airlines and hotels in that region, as well as valuable outbound tourism from the country. But now the disease has shown up in Italy, and notably in Spain’s Canary Islands, shorter haul European travel is being drawn into the fray.Shares in TUI AG, Europe’s biggest travel operator, have fallen about 18% this week, while those of the budget airlines EasyJet Plc and Ryanair Holdings Plc are down by about 20%.Already reeling from the “flight shame” phenomenon, which has seen some environmentally conscious consumers shunning air travel, and disruption from grounded Boeing 737 Max jets, a global viral outbreak will have a profound effect on the confidence of travelers and vacationers everywhere.Europe’s peak period for early holiday bookings, stretching from Boxing Day to the third week of January, ended just as the virus was emerging. The first Saturday in January is known as “Sunshine Saturday,” when holidaymakers hit the travel agents or, more probably, buy their flight and accommodation on the internet.But even booked trips are at risk of cancellation as Europeans digest what’s happening in the Spanish holiday island of Tenerife, where 700 people have been contained in a hotel after several guests were found to have the virus. What’s more troubling for the travel industry is that most of their profit doesn’t come from early bookers, but rather from people who are buying holidays from now onward.The outbreak in northern Italy is equally difficult for the airlines (it is a big part of Ryanair’s business) and travel companies, but that country tends to offer more upmarket destinations. The Canary Islands and mainland Spain — where some cases have also been identified —  are firmly in the middle and mass markets, so the impact there could be bigger. TUI AG’s RIU hotel chain has a strong presence in Spain and the Canary Islands.Cruises, obviously, have been hit hard by the outbreak, given the pictures of passengers quarantined on ships being beamed around the world. That’s another big worry for TUI, which which has been building its ships business. Analysts at Morgan Stanley estimate that the volume of bookings has fallen by double digits across the whole of the cruise market in the U.S. and Europe in recent weeks.If the outbreak is contained relatively soon, the effect on tour operators might be short-lived. Holidaymakers who have held off from booking should come back to the market. But if infections continue beyond May, as looks increasingly likely, the industry’s problems will intensify.At this point, the travel groups are usually snapping up airline capacity for the peak summer months. As they make all of their profit during this period, a prolonged outbreak now would be doubly damaging. One poor summer season in 2018, because of a European heatwave, helped to sink the British travel giant Thomas Cook. That company was also burdened by more than 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) of debt, but it’s fate underlines just how dependent the travel industry is on the traditional beach getaway.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward

    Jabran Khan reviews this FTSE 100 airline and its current investment viability.The post Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: Another sell-off after Black Monday

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. After a Black Monday that wiped nearly $474 billion off the value of European stock markets, shares in the region suffered more heavy losses. The STOXX 600 plunged to its lowest since December 11, ending down 1.8% and after losing 3.8% in the previous session.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Coronavirus: who's next?

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Airlines: virus headwinds, fuel tailwinds

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. AIRLINES: VIRUS HEADWINDS, FUEL TAILWINDS (1502 GMT) Airlines are struggling to recover after Monday's savage sell-off and while virus concerns are no doubt going to create some damage, falling fuel costs need to be added to the equation to get a better picture of the sector's earnings outlook. Analysts at Credit Suisse did some number crunching.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-"Crash like never before"

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Airlines plunge as Italian coronavirus outbreak threatens longer crisis

    PARIS/LONDON, Feb 24 (Reuters) - European budget airlines bore the brunt of Monday's plunge in global stock markets as the arrival of the coronavirus in Italy pointed to a longer, deeper crisis than many have banked on. EasyJet dropped 16.4% and Ryanair 13.5% as airlines were forced to reassess the fallout from the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus across Asia and beyond, with South Korea, Italy and Iran now struggling to contain outbreaks. "Concerns are growing that COVID-19 continues to spread and will impact demand to and from other European countries," Credit Suisse analysts said.

  • European stocks have worst day in four years on coronavirus fears
    Yahoo Finance UK

    European stocks have worst day in four years on coronavirus fears

    European stocks suffered their worst day since 2016 as coronavirus infections climbed in Italy, the eurozone’s third-largest economy.

  • European Stocks Slump on Rising Coronavirus Fears
    Bloomberg

    European Stocks Slump on Rising Coronavirus Fears

    (Bloomberg) -- European equities haven’t had such a bad day since the aftermath of the Brexit vote more than three years ago as increasing concerns over the economic impact of the coronavirus hurt travel and luxury sectors, and volatility spiked.The Stoxx Europe 600 Index closed down 3.8% after falling as much as 4.2% in the sharpest drop since June 27, 2016, led by the travel, mining and auto sectors. Today’s move also wiped out the year-to-date gains for the Stoxx 600. The Euro Stoxx 50 Volatility Index surged as much as 49%, the most since the so-called “Volmageddon” of February 2018 -- when Wall Street was rocked by a surge in volatility and a sell-off in stocks.Luxury companies tumbled on fears that the epidemic will hurt sales, with LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton SE losing 4.7% and Roche Holding AG dropping 3.2%. The Stoxx 600 Travel and Leisure Index fell 6%, with Air France-KLM declining 8.7%, EasyJet Plc tumbling 17% and Ryanair Holdings Plc losing 14%.“We believe the coronavirus illness will substantially curtail store traffic in China and neighboring countries, may negatively affect incoming Chinese tourism, and is also likely to disrupt supply chains,” Oliver Chen, a retail analyst at Cowen & Co., wrote in a report on Monday.Money managers are selling stocks and looking for havens after South Korea saw a surge in cases to 763 and the concern about a jump in illnesses in Italy intensified. European equities advanced to a fresh record high last week, which is adding to investor anxiety about possibly stretched positioning and valuations.“Markets are in a risk-off mode amid concerns about the global spread of coronavirus, with a growing number of infections outside of China,” said Ulrich Urbahn, head of multi-asset strategy and research at Joh Berenberg Gossler & Co., which recently cut its exposure to commodities and favors quality European stocks. “Given the strong performance and elevated positioning in equities, the risks are clearly skewed to the downside.”The impact from China’s slowdown due to the coronavirus as well as supply, sales and production disruptions at major firms such as Apple Inc., are a major concern for asset managers. European equities are particularly sensitive as Goldman Sachs Group Inc. says the exposure of the Euro Stoxx 50 Index to China is about twice that of the S&P 500 due to such sectors as banks, automakers and luxury shares.Italy’s FTSE MIB Index led the declines among major European benchmarks, retreating as much as 6.1%, the most since June 2016, after Europe’s biggest surge of the coronavirus prompted the government to impose a lockdown on an area of 50,000 people near Milan, and authorities canceled the remaining days of the Venice Carnival, while universities closed. Some of the biggest Italian companies -- from banks to luxury firms -- were battered. Salvatore Ferragamo SpA declined as much as 10% and Juventus Football Club SpA lost as much as 12%.Goldman’s chief global equity strategist Peter Oppenheimer said last week that a 1% drop in global sales-weighted gross domestic product would cut European earnings by about 10%, turning them negative.The U.S. stock market extended the global slump, with the S&P 500 falling as much as 3.2% and the Nasdaq 100 losing up to 4.4%.However, continuous monetary easing by major global central banks and China’s efforts to support its economy are making some investors optimistic that the sell-off in risk assets won’t last for long. The London-based wealth manager Kingswood is currently neutral on stocks and looking to increase equity positions in case of a significant market correction.“The disruption caused by the virus will hit economic activity significantly in the first quarter, with global growth very likely to grind to a halt,” said Rupert Thompson, chief investment officer at Kingswood, which has about 2.5 billion pounds ($3.2 billion) under management. “But we continue to believe that the outbreak is likely to follow the path of previous such health scares with growth rebounding in the second and third quarters.”To contact the reporter on this story: Ksenia Galouchko in London at kgalouchko1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Blaise Robinson at brobinson58@bloomberg.net, Jon Menon, Paul JarvisFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is this popular stock a buy after a 10% price crash?
    Fool.co.uk

    Is this popular stock a buy after a 10% price crash?

    Here are two stocks falling heavily on Monday. Are they set for a quick rebound?The post Is this popular stock a buy after a 10% price crash? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Did easyJet plc (LON:EZJ) Insiders Buy Up More Shares?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did easyJet plc (LON:EZJ) Insiders Buy Up More Shares?

    We often see insiders buying up shares in companies that perform well over the long term. The flip side of that is...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: STOXX and DAX at record highs

    * European stocks rise: STOXX, DAX hit record highs * AMS dips despite Q4 beat, share sale for Osram takeover in focus * Central bankers: eyes on Lagarde, Carney and Powell speeches * TUI surges on coronavirus fears respite Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. CLOSING SNAPSHOT: STOXX AND DAX AT RECORD HIGHS (1655 GMT) Big day of records for European shares as both the pan European and the German indices have climbed to all-time highs on hopes the coronavirus is peaking after China's senior medical adviser suggested the outbreak crisis may be over in April.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-"Chasing the unicorns": DAX at new record

    * European stocks rise: STOXX, DAX hit record highs * AMS dips despite Q4 beat, share sale for Osram takeover in focus * Central bankers: eyes on Lagarde, Carney and Powell speeches * TUI surges on coronavirus fears respite Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. "CHASING THE UNICORNS": DAX AT NEW RECORD (1628 GMT) Germany's exporter-heavy DAX index has climbed to a new record high, mirroring Wall Street benchmarks, but there's a lot of scepticism out there over whether these gains are justified, given China and the country's internal troubles.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Powell, pleeaasse, some more of theeese!

    * European stocks rise: STOXX, DAX hit record highs * AMS dips despite Q4 beat, share sale for Osram takeover in focus * Central bankers: eyes on Lagarde, Carney and Powell speeches * TUI surges on coronavirus fears respite Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. The recent Chinese generic version from the PBOC has done wonders and QE addicts all over the world are now hoping the coronavirus will provide some excuse to extend the monetary buzz before the effect of the last fix wears off.

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