LGEN.L - Legal & General Group Plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
255.70
+8.50 (+3.44%)
At close: 4:35PM BST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close247.20
Open247.80
Bid243.00 x 0
Ask256.60 x 0
Day's range247.70 - 256.25
52-week range214.90 - 292.30
Volume18,523,821
Avg. volume17,290,761
Market cap15.251B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.86
PE ratio (TTM)7.89
EPS (TTM)32.40
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.17 (6.78%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-15
1y target est288.79
  • Is the Legal amp;amp; General share price (LON:LGEN) good value at 236p?
    Stockopedia

    Is the Legal amp;amp; General share price (LON:LGEN) good value at 236p?

    Here's why how cheap or expensive shares in large cap Investment Management amp;amp; Fund Operators operator Legal amp;amp; General (LON:LGEN)matters. Stacks8230;

  • Forget M&S: I think this FTSE 100 company could be a better bet
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget M&S: I think this FTSE 100 company could be a better bet

    With Marks & Spencer Group (LON: MKS) looking like it could drop out of the FTSE 100, I think this company is worth investigating instead.

  • Did You Manage To Avoid Legal & General Group's (LON:LGEN) 12% Share Price Drop?
    Simply Wall St.

    Did You Manage To Avoid Legal & General Group's (LON:LGEN) 12% Share Price Drop?

    Investors can approximate the average market return by buying an index fund. While individual stocks can be big...

  • 2 FTSE 100 dividend growth shares I’d buy in a Stocks and Shares ISA today
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 dividend growth shares I’d buy in a Stocks and Shares ISA today

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could produce high returns when purchased in a Stocks and Shares ISA in my opinion.

  • The State Pension is too low! That’s why I’d pop these 2 bargain FTSE 100 dividend stocks into an ISA
    Fool.co.uk

    The State Pension is too low! That’s why I’d pop these 2 bargain FTSE 100 dividend stocks into an ISA

    Harvey Jones picks out two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) dividend income heroes that could help you overcome State Pension worries.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Better than bonds & FANGs

    STOXX 600 +0.9% * German real estate stocks up after some comforting news on Berlin rent freeze * Deutsche Wohnen +9.9%, Vonovia +5.3% * CNH Industrial +5.9% after reports co considering hiving off truck unit Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: josephine.mason.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net BETTER THAN BONDS & FANGS (1156 GMT) While investors are busy gobbling up negative-yielding bonds, shunning risky assets, to safeguard their money from the ongoing U.S.-China trade spat and a teetering global economy, one stock is benefitting from the rush for bonds. Marketaxess - the electronic bond trading platform - has more than doubled in value in the last one year and is now valued at nearly $15 billion.

  • Forget Bitcoin or gold! I’d buy these FTSE 100 dividend stocks in my ISA instead
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget Bitcoin or gold! I’d buy these FTSE 100 dividend stocks in my ISA instead

    Desperate times mean desperate investors reach for so-called safe havens. GlaxoSmithKline plc (LON:GSK) and Legal & General plc (LON:LGEN) may not be sexy but they are solid.

  • Pension World Reels From 'Financial Vandalism' of Falling Yields
    Bloomberg

    Pension World Reels From 'Financial Vandalism' of Falling Yields

    (Bloomberg) -- A once-unthinkable collapse in global bond yields is forcing pension funds to buy bonds that offer negative returns -- putting the financial security of future retirees in jeopardy.U.S. institutions managing trillions of dollars in retirement savings -- including the California Public Employees’ Retirement System -- have been ratcheting down return expectations. Japan’s Government Pension Investment Fund, the world’s largest, has warned that money managers risk losses across asset classes. In Europe, pension funds may be forced to cut benefits in part thanks to the decline in rates.Investors were already taking on more credit risk to make up for dwindling income elsewhere, with some chasing less liquid markets like private debt. Now, negative yields on over a quarter of investment-grade bonds -- with more monetary easing to come -- are increasing the urgency for portfolio managers to find new sources of returns.“The true madness is pension funds being forced to invest in assets which will be guaranteed to lose, such as in the case of long dated inflation-linked gilts at real yields of -3%,” said Mark Dowding, chief investment officer at BlueBay Asset Management, which has pension-fund mandates. “It is financial vandalism and the government and central banks need to wake up to this.”Pension funds invest in a variety of assets, but most including defined-benefit plans use low-risk assets such as government bonds as the benchmark discount rate. While that means they have profited from the fixed-income rally, falling yields have also driven up future liabilities -- in turn threatening their ability to meet oncoming obligations.“The $16 trillion of nominal negative yielding bonds in the world right now -- for the pension industry that’s not a good outcome,” Nigel Wilson, the chief executive offer of Legal & General Group Plc, said in a Bloomberg Television interview. Ben Meng, chief investment officer of Calpers said earlier this year that the expected return over the next 10 years would be 6.1%, down from a previous target of 7%. Scott Minerd, chief investment officer of Guggenheim Partners, warns that the Federal Reserve’s policy easing is contributing to a likely government-bond bubble and that very narrow credit spreads have greater potential to widen.Ten-year yields are negative across higher-rated European government bond markets while Germany’s entire curve fell below zero. Similar rates are also sub-zero in Japan, while they’ve recently hit record lows in Australia and New Zealand. In the U.S., 30-year Treasury rates hit an all-time low of 1.91% this month.‘Dire’ SituationPeter Borgdorff at Dutch fund PFZW blamed “that ever-lower interest rate” for its coverage ratio that stood at 94.8% at the end of July.“The financial situation of PFZW is starting to get dire,” Borgdorff wrote in his blog. “A pension reduction in the year 2021 has been threatening for some time. But if we have a coverage ratio at the end of this year that is lower than around 94%, we should already reduce pensions even next year.”The plunge in yields risks spawning a vicious circle for the industry. The squeeze on returns tends to widen funding gaps, forcing managers or employers to inject more cash into the plans. That’s money which could have otherwise been used to fuel business or consumption so economic growth may take a hit -- boosting calls for even more monetary easing.Shrinking Assets“The overall impact is that lower yields can induce households or companies that act as plan sponsors, to save even more for the future,” said Nikolaos Panigirtzoglou, a strategist at JPMorgan Chase & Co, in a recent note. “In our conversations with clients, the experiments of central banks with negative rates are viewed more as a policy mistake rather than stimulus.”Pension assets dropped 4% in 2018 to $27.6 trillion, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. While gains on stocks have helped plug funding gaps, it’s no secret that income-starved managers have dived into less liquid assets.One way out of the pension quagmire is to allow more retirement funds to invest in “real assets in the real economy,” said Wilson at Legal & General. Cases are legion. One of the Nordic region’s largest pension funds is reducing its stock of government bonds for alternative assets, which could include real estate and private equity. A scheme for the retired clergy in England is shifting allocations to private credit. A fund for U.K. railworkers, meanwhile, is looking to boost exposure to private debt to as much as 40% within a private-investment strategy totaling 4.5 billion pounds ($5.5 billion) across two funds.Chris Iggo, chief investment officer for fixed income at AXA Investment Managers, frets over the fallout from this extended era of ultra-low yields.“In 2008, most people in the markets had no idea about the leveraged web of instruments that were ultimately linked to the housing market in the U.S.,” he wrote in a note, referring to the subprime debt crisis. “We should be worried about lower and lower bond yields...They may cause some, as yet not fully understood, tensions in the financial system with structural implications.”(Adds comments from CEO of Legal & General.)\--With assistance from Liz Capo McCormick, Charlotte Ryan and Tom Keene.To contact the reporter on this story: Anchalee Worrachate in London at aworrachate@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Samuel Potter at spotter33@bloomberg.net, Anil Varma, Sid VermaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The 'Bank of Mum and Dad' is one of Britain's biggest mortgage lenders
    Yahoo Finance UK

    The 'Bank of Mum and Dad' is one of Britain's biggest mortgage lenders

    Collectively, parents have £6.3bn to their children to buy a property.

  • Looking for stocks to buy? I’d go for this FTSE 100 dividend stock and this growth stock
    Fool.co.uk

    Looking for stocks to buy? I’d go for this FTSE 100 dividend stock and this growth stock

    Edward Sheldon reveals the names of two stocks, including a FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) dividend stock yielding 8%, that he believes are priced to buy right now.

  • Legal & General plans rival product to compete with new pension superfunds
    Reuters

    Legal & General plans rival product to compete with new pension superfunds

    UK insurer Legal & General aims to take on incoming pension superfunds with a similar product of its own to bolster corporate retirement schemes, a company executive told Reuters. Legal & General is already talking to employers and regulators about the product, which would be suitable for schemes that may not be able to afford a so-called bulk annuity - insurance that pensions will be paid in full - Laura Mason, CEO of Legal & General retirement institutional, said. "We are working with a couple of (employer) sponsors," she said, adding that the product could be used by pension schemes with a "medium" level of funding.

  • 2 FTSE 100 companies I’d add to my Stocks and Shares ISA
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 companies I’d add to my Stocks and Shares ISA

    Conor Coyle would buy these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) stalwarts for his ISA as they continue to perform strongly and deliver the goods.

  • The 2 best dividend stocks I’d buy for high yields in a recession
    Fool.co.uk

    The 2 best dividend stocks I’d buy for high yields in a recession

    With a sea of red on the horizon, my undervalued picks to ride out the storm are Aviva and Legal & General.

  • I’d buy these FTSE 100 stocks for a retirement portfolio today
    Fool.co.uk

    I’d buy these FTSE 100 stocks for a retirement portfolio today

    These FTSE 100 (LON:INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks should continue to provide an income for your retirement portfolio for many years to come.

  • What Makes Legal & General Group Plc (LON:LGEN) A Great Dividend Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Makes Legal & General Group Plc (LON:LGEN) A Great Dividend Stock?

    Over the past 10 years Legal & General Group Plc (LON:LGEN) has grown its dividend payouts from £0.041 to £0.16. With...

  • 2 high-yielding stocks I would buy for a passive income
    Fool.co.uk

    2 high-yielding stocks I would buy for a passive income

    If you are a fan of large dividends, these two stocks might just be a dream come true.

  • 3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy that pay more than the Lloyds share price
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy that pay more than the Lloyds share price

    Roland Head highlights three high-yield FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) dividend stocks for investors worried about the Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) share price.

  • This FTSE 100 dividend stock still looks a bargain to me
    Fool.co.uk

    This FTSE 100 dividend stock still looks a bargain to me

    Searching for reliable income? This FTSE 100 (LON:INDEXFTSE:UKX) stock ticks all the boxes, according to this Fool.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-UK investors seek safety in bonds amid Brexit worries

    * European stocks recover losses after 3-day rout * STOXX 600 off earlier highs, now up 0.4% * Miners, financial services lead FTSE 100 fallers * Investors seek out bargains, but worry about trade spat * Bayer and Lanxess gain after divesting chemical park unit * Wall Street futures indicate weak opening Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: rm://josephine.mason.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net UK INVESTORS SEEK SAFETY IN BONDS AMID BREXIT WORRIES (1238 GMT) UK investors piled into bonds and shunned equities last month at their fastest pace in some time, data from Calastone shows, the latest fund flow numbers to highlight the scramble for safety as worries about a no-deal Brexit and the slowing economy have grown.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-A sense of deja vu in stock markets

    * European stocks recover losses after 3-day rout * FTSE lags on miners, financial services * Investors seek out bargains, but worry about trade spat * Bayer and Lanxess gain after divesting chemical park unit Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: rm://josephine.mason.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net A SENSE OF DEJA VU IN STOCK MARKETS (0949 GMT) European markets have lost close to 4.5% since Trump's latest tariff threat and there is a sense of deja vu in this. A quick look at how some sectors performed 6 days after Trump's threat in May versus 4 trading days after the August threat suggests there has been a sharper move this time but in both cases, the same names underperformed markets.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Miners: negative catalysts

    * European stocks recover losses after 3-day rout * FTSE lags on miners, financial services * Investors seek out bargains, but worry about trade spat * Bayer and Lanxess gain after divesting chemical park unit Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: rm://josephine.mason.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net MINERS: NEGATIVE CATALYSTS (0856 GMT) Miners are not having a great time of late as escalating trade tensions send shivers through the sector and the industry index is trading at fresh 2019 lows with disappointing results from Glencore being the latest drag to the index, which the only one that's missing out on today's rebound in Europe.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Legal & General profits boosted by corporate pension deals

    Companies are increasingly eager to offload pension scheme liabilities to insurance companies such as L&G, which is a major player in this so-called bulk annuity market, insuring companies' final salary pension schemes. In June, it agreed to a record 4.6 billion pound bulk annuity deal with the Rolls-Royce UK pension scheme. "So we're feeling good about the fundamentals of our business, not just in H2 but over the next 10 years," said Chief Executive Nigel Wilson.

  • Next Recession Will Be Based on U.S. Corporates, Says Legal & General’s Roe
    Bloomberg

    Next Recession Will Be Based on U.S. Corporates, Says Legal & General’s Roe

    Aug.29 -- John Roe, head of multi-asset funds at Legal & General Investment Management, discusses the U.S. economy, the probability of a recession and how a stronger GDP figure could change cuts pricing. He speaks on “Bloomberg Markets: European Open.”

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more