MNG.L - M&G plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
173.55
+2.15 (+1.25%)
At close: 4:35PM BST
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Previous close171.40
Open168.95
Bid174.95 x N/A
Ask175.10 x N/A
Day's range168.15 - 177.25
52-week range86.40 - 11,395.00
Volume8,086,771
Avg. volume12,236,222
Market cap4.511B
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)4.04
EPS (TTM)43.00
Earnings date10 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.24 (13.70%)
Ex-dividend date16 Apr 2020
1y target estN/A
  • Forget the Bitcoin price! I’d invest in this stock market crash bargain right now instead
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget the Bitcoin price! I’d invest in this stock market crash bargain right now instead

    The M&G share price is still 30% off the year-to-date highs, making it a worthy stock market crash bargain in the eyes of Jonathan Smith.The post Forget the Bitcoin price! I'd invest in this stock market crash bargain right now instead appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • I think these could be the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now
    Fool.co.uk

    I think these could be the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now

    With growing bottom lines and attractive income credentials, these could be some of the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now, says this Fool. The post I think these could be the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • In a Dismal Year for Funds, a Winner Is Emerging in Pandemic
    Bloomberg

    In a Dismal Year for Funds, a Winner Is Emerging in Pandemic

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As this dismally depressing year approaches its mid-point, a winner is starting to emerge from the pack of European fund managers. And while sheer scale and a diverse business model have helped DWS Group GmbH weather the first phase of this pandemic better than its peers, the firm’s ongoing frugality is what really sets it apart.The shares of asset management companies typically mirror the broader stock market, rising and falling as a proxy for equities generally. Before the novel coronavirus outbreak trashed markets toward the end of February, DWS was handily leading its rivals. Since equities have recovered, the Frankfurt-based company has rebounded to become the only European asset manager in positive territory for the year.Cost is one of the few variables a fund-management company is able to control, and investors are rewarding DWS, which manages 700 billion euros ($791 billion), for its focus on frugality. Chief Executive Officer Asoka Woehrmann has been on a cost-cutting drive since his appointment as head of the company in October 2018, seven months after Deutsche Bank AG sold and listed about a fifth of the business, retaining an 80% stake. Earlier this month, Woehrmann shrank his management board to six members from eight as part of efforts to save at least 150 million euros a year.For asset managers’ cost-to-income ratios, the direction of travel matters at least as much as the absolute level. DWS reduced its key measure to 65.8% by the end of the first quarter, down from 70.9% at the end of 2018 and more than 74% in mid-2018. It promises more to come. “We can still expand our savings efforts,” DWS Chief Financial Officer Claire Peel said in an interview published by Boersen-Zeitung last week.At the asset-management business of M&G Plc, which oversees 323 billion pounds ($407 billion), the cost-to-income ratio worsened to 63% at the end of last year from 59% a year earlier. Some of those additional expenses came as it adjusted to life as a stand-alone company, after being spun out from Prudential Plc in October.M&G has pledged to cut spending by an annual 145 million pounds in the next few years. In March, the London-based firm introduced a voluntary redundancy program aimed at trimming personnel expenses by 10% this year, but the virus may have blown that off track.Amundi SA, Europe’s biggest asset manager, with 1.53 trillion euros of assets, remains the market leader in stinginess, with its cost-to-income dropping below 50% at the end of March, down from an already impressive 53% at the end of 2018. But that leaves limited scope for further savings at the Paris-based company.Both DWS and Amundi have sizable suites of index-tracking products available, enabling them to ride the wave of investor enthusiasm for lower-cost passive products while their peers are stuck trying to extol the benefits of active strategies. As I wrote in May, stock pickers were unable to beat their benchmarks in either March or the first quarter as a whole — a period of market convulsions that should have been the time for active management to shine. It’s a lackluster performance that will only exacerbate the shift to index tracking.The fund management industry has faced straitened circumstances for several years. This year’s share-price action suggests shareholders will continue to favor those firms best able to play the parsimony game. With the income side of the equation looking as fragile as ever, more belt-tightening lies ahead.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mark Gilbert is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering asset management. He previously was the London bureau chief for Bloomberg News. He is also the author of "Complicit: How Greed and Collusion Made the Credit Crisis Unstoppable."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 shares I’d buy today with dividend yields over 8%
    Fool.co.uk

    3 shares I’d buy today with dividend yields over 8%

    These high yielders are among the best shares to buy today for income investors, says Roland Head, who think these 7%+ yields should be sustainable.The post 3 shares I'd buy today with dividend yields over 8% appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Forget the June premium bond draw! Here’s an income-paying stock I’d buy right now
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget the June premium bond draw! Here’s an income-paying stock I’d buy right now

    Jonathan Smith outlines why he prefers to buy an income-paying stock such as M&G and ignore the latest premium bond draw.The post Forget the June premium bond draw! Here's an income-paying stock I'd buy right now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • M&G plc (LON:MNG) Analysts Just Trimmed Their Revenue Forecasts By 48%
    Simply Wall St.

    M&G plc (LON:MNG) Analysts Just Trimmed Their Revenue Forecasts By 48%

    One thing we could say about the analysts on M&G plc (LON:MNG) - they aren't optimistic, having just made a major...

  • Bloomberg

    Here's More Proof Property Isn't Liquid

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In investing as in comedy, timing is everything — a lesson holders of U.K. property funds are about to (re)learn at their cost. In the wake of the U.K.’s 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, British property funds were among the investments quickest to suffer as asset managers trapped $23 billion by halting redemptions in seven funds. With the global pandemic threatening to trash the economy, U.K. real estate vehicles are again at the vanguard of illiquidity — casting renewed doubts over their suitability as investments that offer daily withdrawal rights.Aviva Plc, Legal & General Group Plc and Columbia Threadneedle Investments are among firms that have frozen redemptions from funds overseeing about $13 billion of U.K. real estate this week. With the Association of Real Estate Funds citing “material valuation uncertainty,” and the Financial Conduct Authority saying “a fair and reasonable valuation of commercial real estate funds cannot be established” — both statements made on Wednesday —  there’s a real prospect that the entire U.K. property fund sector may close for withdrawals in the coming days.The funds that have gated cover the gamut of property classes and geography, according to their most recent fact sheets. That suggests the market dislocation is widespread and not just restricted to, say, shopping malls. The Legal & General fund has 35% of its assets in industrial property, compared with less than 5% for the Aviva fund, for example. About 10% of the latter’s portfolio, meantime, is in London, compared with just 0.4% of the Threadneedle fund’s assets.New rules proposed by the FCA last year compelling fund managers to suspend redemptions if there’s “material uncertainty” about the value of 20% or more of a funds’ real estate holdings were due to come into force later this year. Asset managers clearly aren’t hanging around in the current climate for their cash holdings to be depleted by investors demanding repayment. Time and again, the hard to sell nature of office buildings and shops and warehouses, compared with the almost frictionless markets for stocks and bonds, keeps catching the fund management industry out. Investors in a 2.5 billion-pound ($3 billion) fund run by M&G Plc have been locked in since December, when the firm said it faced “unusually high and sustained outflows,” which it was struggling to meet.As I argued then, while it’s clearly desirable for retail investors to have different ways of investing in bricks and mortar, the illiquidity of real estate is incompatible with the pretense that such vehicles can be redeemed on a daily basis. Regulators need to provide official cover for asset managers to drop their pledge to let customers take their money out on a continuous basis; three- or six-month lockups make a lot more sense, provided the industry moves in lockstep. On the basis you should never let a good crisis go to waste, it’s time for the regulators to resolve the timing mismatch between the funds and their underlying asset transactions — albeit too late for the U.K. investors who currently have savings trapped in shuttered funds for the foreseeable future.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mark Gilbert is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering asset management. He previously was the London bureau chief for Bloomberg News. He is also the author of "Complicit: How Greed and Collusion Made the Credit Crisis Unstoppable."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should M&G Plc (LON:MNG) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should M&G Plc (LON:MNG) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Dividend paying stocks like M&G Plc (LON:MNG) tend to be popular with investors, and for good reason - some research...

  • Is the Mamp;G share price cheap?
    Stockopedia

    Is the Mamp;G share price cheap?

    Mamp;amp;G (LON:MNG) is a large cap in the Investment Management amp;amp; Fund Operators industry. The Company manages investments for both individuals and f8230;

  • Dan Loeb’s $48 Billion Target Has SomeTesty Investors
    Bloomberg

    Dan Loeb’s $48 Billion Target Has SomeTesty Investors

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Dan Loeb’s Third Point LLC says it has a history of working constructively with boards to promote the success of their companies. The activist’s latest goal seems to involve removing the board of Prudential Plc entirely, and dismantling the head office around it, as part of a breakup of the $48 billion insurer.That may not be as hard as it sounds.Once focused on Britain, Prudential has transformed into a large Asian insurer with a smaller U.S. business attached. Its shares suffer under a stark valuation discount to Hong Kong-listed peer AIA Group Ltd., and Loeb has set out a plausible explanation for why. The reason, he says, is that the Asian side needs capital to grow, but competes with shareholders for dividends. Likewise, the U.S. business would be better off conserving cash in support of its own capital strength. Meanwhile, most investors don’t want to invest in an Asian-U.S. hybrid insurer.The remedy sounds simple: Split Prudential into separate U.S. and Asian businesses with their own stock listings and dividend policies. The Asian shares would probably command a much higher valuation than whole the group does now,  providing an acquisition currency that would be a cheap source of growth capital. At the same time, scrapping the conglomerate structure would eliminate the need for a costly corporate center based in London.None of this is likely to be a huge surprise to Prudential’s directors. The board has already been simplifying the company, mainly by spinning off  the M&G Plc asset management business. That move has failed to address the valuation gap, so the next logical step would be to jettison the U.S. subsidiary and become a pure Asia play. Prudential’s chairman, Paul Manduca, is retiring next year anyway, and Chief Executive Officer Mike Wells has been in the role for five years. Manduca’s successor, banker and former government minister Shriti Vadera, has a chance to be radical.The real opponents to Loeb’s ideas are more likely to be found among Prudential’s long-term investors. Third Point is a new arrival taking on a longstanding problem. But Prudential has a large number of U.K. investors whose own narrow interests may be served by keeping it in its current form, paying high dividends via a London-listed share. Recall that consumer giant Unilever NV encountered huge resistance to an attempt to simplify its structure in 2018, while plumbing group Ferguson Plc is moving with extreme care about a possible re-domicile for the same reason.Loeb argues Prudential in two pieces would be worth twice what it is today. He may be right, but if a breakup involves a dividend cut along the way, it won’t be plain sailing.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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