NMR - Nomura Holdings, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
4.5500
+0.1100 (+2.48%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous close4.4400
Open4.5400
Bid0.0000 x 1400
Ask4.5400 x 1300
Day's range4.5100 - 4.5500
52-week range3.1800 - 5.4100
Volume196,402
Avg. volume332,241
Market cap13.866B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.15
PE ratio (TTM)16.49
EPS (TTM)0.2760
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.18 (4.12%)
Ex-dividend date30 Mar 2020
1y target est5.12
  • Revenge Doesn’t Explain Rise in Chinese Property Prices
    Bloomberg

    Revenge Doesn’t Explain Rise in Chinese Property Prices

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Real estate becomes a safe bet in uncertain times, and it’s proving true in China after months of pent-up demand from the pandemic runs into an outlook still filled with uncertainty.The problem, as we’ve seen time and again, is that anyone hoping for security from a market that’s heavily controlled may be in for disappointment, as the government will inevitably tighten limits when prices rise too much. Beijing should instead  ramp up secure options for investors, such as accelerating the offering of real estate investment trusts. Recent gains in mainland real estate prices have all the hallmarks of so-called revenge spending for big purchases after lockdowns eased. Prices rose in May at the fastest pace in seven months, and analysts think June will be even better. Sales by the 16 developers Bloomberg Intelligence tracks rose an average 13% in June versus a year earlier. It might look like a splurge, yet there are signs that these gains will be sustainable, even if capped by government policy that discourages speculation in favor of habitation. Expect selective rises where people feel their money is safe, like big tier-one cities such as Shanghai and Beijing, as well as Guangzhou and Shenzhen, part of the government-promoted Greater Bay Area that encompasses Hong Kong and Macau. There’s certainly a desire to scratch the spending itch. Much of China’s economy was shut in the spring as the government, keen to stop Covid-19 from spreading, halted land sales to developers and purchases of homes. Now developers have come back in with huge discounts. But there are deeper factors at play that should keep lifting prices.First, since the coronavirus hit, the government has been easing credit. Mortgage rates are at 33-month lows, with the average for a first-time home buyer at 5.28%. Many shut out from an increasingly unaffordable housing market are taking advantage, as are investors keen for something safer than volatile stocks.Second, the government is creating demand in some cities, loosening residency rules to encourage people to move in from rural areas. The theory is that a larger urban class boosts consumption — though what it has really lifted is buying homes. The reform of local residency permits includes easing access to these “hukou” for anyone with tertiary education in cities like Hangzhou, where Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. is based.  The city of 10 million people added 554,000 residents last year, the biggest increase in permanent population of any city in China.Martin Wong, Greater China associate director at Knight Frank LLP  forecasts that home prices will rise between 2% and 3% this year in the first-tier cities, and between 3% and 5% in the Greater Bay Area cities. In contrast, urban areas not benefiting from hukou relaxation or lacking the kind of government-infrastructure spending drive to offset the pandemic’s economic impact should see prices stay flat or rise just around 2%, he says. In May, Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou and Shenzhen saw new home prices increase more than 1% for the second month in a row. The last time the tier-one cities experienced gains of this magnitude was in late 2016; since then, much of the climb in property prices has been in smaller cities that have fewer restrictions on buying for investment. Older homes rose around 0.6%, beating gains elsewhere. In China, unlike most countries, local authorities cap prices on the sale of new homes, so they can actually be cheaper than older ones.Still, these small percentages show that China is in no mood to allow a big housing boom, even though real estate spending and all its attendant construction and furnishings account for a quarter of the economy. Funding remains tight for developers. As an example, the one-year-loan prime rate is down 40 basis points to 3.85% since last August, but the five-year-loan prime rate on which mortgages are based has fallen just 20 basis points to 4.65%. Developers who want to build housing can only issue new onshore or offshore bonds to finance repaying existing bonds expiring in 12 months, according to Nomura Holdings Inc. analysts, and need approval for offshore loans. No wonder there’s a long queue spinning off their real-estate management arms — which tend to have better steady cash flow — for Hong Kong listings. One solution that would ease the debt burden on developers while giving investors safer diversification is to expand a real estate investment trust trial that China kicked off in April. It has been focused on pooling capital to fund infrastructure such as highways and airports — perhaps no surprise, as this could give the economy a faster boost. But at some point, why not include real estate, both commercial and residential? That would let Chinese families, who have around 70% of their wealth tied up in property — more than double the U.S. — invest in their favorite asset and still diversify into stocks. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nomura Files Annual Report on Form 20-F
    Business Wire

    Nomura Files Annual Report on Form 20-F

    Nomura Holdings filed its Annual Report on Form 20-F (for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020) with SEC on June 30, 2020.

  • China’s JPMorgan Isn’t Coming Anytime Soon
    Bloomberg

    China’s JPMorgan Isn’t Coming Anytime Soon

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- China is attempting to create its own JPMorgan Chase & Co. The ambitions could prove hard to satisfy.Regulatory authorities may allow some of the largest commercial lenders into the brokerage industry to perform services that include investment banking, underwriting initial public offerings, retail brokering, and proprietary trading, local media outlet Caixin reported. With capital markets flailing and direct financing struggling to take hold as debt rises across the economy, what better way than to bring in its trillion-dollar whales to boost the financial sector?There is logic to this. Size matters, and the volumes could lead to success. China’s banks have more than $40 trillion in assets; the securities industry’s amount to around 3% of that. The largest lender, Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd., had 32.1 trillion yuan ($4.5 trillion) in assets and 650 million retail customers as of March, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. The biggest broker, CITIC Securities Co., had 922 billion yuan and 8.7 million retail clients. Banks have thousands of branches with deeper distribution channels.But banks are the load-bearing pillars of China’s financial system. Regulators have asked lenders to show leniency with hard-up borrowers and to forego profits in the name of national service, in both tough and normal times. Granting brokerage licenses could help them create another channel of (small) profits.Banks stepping in where brokers have failed could help the broader capital markets. In theory, commercial lenders know how to deal with different types of risk, like with the ups and downs in the value of a security and market movements. They’re already big participants in bond markets and have access. Bringing banks into mainstream brokering could help reduce the intensity of risk associated with the trillions of dollars of credit being created in China every month. It may also help solve a persistent problem: the inefficient allocation of credit that has led to mispriced assets.All of this is contingent upon the banks pulling their weight. Going by past experiments, they haven’t brought the heft that Beijing had hoped. Consider China’s life insurance industry. It took bank-backed players in this sector a decade to build a foothold. Their market share grew to 9.2% last year from 2.5% in 2010. The brokerage arms of Chinese banks in Hong Kong have fared little better. Bank of China International Securities, set up in 2002 by Bank of China Ltd., remains a mid-size broker by assets and revenue, Goldman Sachs says. Top executives come from the bank; related-party transactions with the parent account for just about 14% for underwriting business and around 39% for income from asset management fees.Catapulting ICBC to the same stature as JPMorgan — a full service bank with a 200-year history — may take a while. The American financial giant has hired big, and opportunistically built out businesses. It bought and merged with firms like Banc One Corp. and Bear Stearns Cos. and is in consumer banking, prime brokerage and cash clearing. The services it offers run the gamut of credit cards, retail branches, investment banking, and asset management. Shareholders have mostly rewarded the efforts.For China’s biggest lenders, conflicting and competing priorities will make this challenging. They’re already being required to take on more balance sheet risk, lend to weak companies and roll over loans while maintaining capital buffers, keeping depositors happy and essentially martyring themselves. Now, they’ll be adding brokering at a time when traditional revenue sources are shrinking in that business. And it won’t happen overnight, or even in the next two years. As for brokers? Their stock prices dropped on the news that banks would be wading into their territory.Beijing’s efforts to shore up its capital markets may look OK on paper, but they’re increasingly muddled and interests aren’t aligned. As China attempts to make its financial sector more institutional and less fragmented while it’s also letting in foreign banks and brokers, allowing the big homegrown institutions to do more, with additional leeway, doesn’t necessarily make for a stronger system. As I’ve written, experiments like these can have unexpected results.Over time, it won’t be surprising to see China’s large brokers and banks start looking very similar; for instance, big securities firms becoming bank holding-type companies, as one investor suggested. That may be a laudable goal for Beijing, but is it realistic? And does it take into account the problems on the financing side, such as misallocation and transmission? Ultimately, none of this really gets at one big problem: unproductive credit.All the while, regulators are inviting in the likes of the actual JPMorgan Chase and Nomura Holdings Inc. and giving them bigger roles. China won’t be ready. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nomura (NMR) Launches Institutional-Grade Custody Platform
    Zacks

    Nomura (NMR) Launches Institutional-Grade Custody Platform

    Nomura (NMR) launches a secure and compliant digital asset custodian for institutional investors along with its crypto-partners, CoinShares and Ledger.

  • Nomura and partners launch digital asset custodian Komainu
    Reuters

    Nomura and partners launch digital asset custodian Komainu

    Japanese bank Nomura Holdings Inc and cryptocurrency partners Ledger and CoinShares launched Komainu, a custodian to safeguard digital assets for financial institutions, on Wednesday. The joint venture, announced in 2018, is regulated by the Jersey Financial Services Commission, the companies said in a statement. Komainu's debut comes as more established financial firms explore offering custody and other services for cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, and other digital assets.

  • Bloomberg

    Tencent Buying iQiyi Smells a Lot Like That Uber Deal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The idea of Tencent Holdings Ltd. buying a stake in Chinese video service iQiyi Inc. looks good on paper. Their current rivalry in the content-streaming market undercuts both companies, depressing their earnings.In reality, though, a tie-up between the social media giant and the subsidiary of Baidu Inc. is more likely to look like Didi Chuxing’s buyout of rival Uber Technologies Inc.’s China division. A short-term detente may turn in to an opportunity for other players,  which would leave the merged entity back at square one, facing fresh competition.Tencent has approached Baidu about purchasing shares in iQiyi in a deal that would displace the search-engine provider as its biggest shareholder, Reuters reported Tuesday, citing sources it didn’t identify. That would be a big deal, literally, given that Baidu owned 56.2% of the Nasdaq-listed company as of mid-February.IQiyi and Tencent Video are currently the largest long-form video providers in China (as opposed to short form, such as Douyin/TikTok), with around 500 million monthly active users apiece. Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s Youku trails with 324 million, Credit Suisse Group AG notes, citing data from researcher QuestMobile.That means there would definitely be synergies if iQiyi and Tencent Video hooked up, notably on content costs, Credit Suisse analysts Tina Long and Ashley Wu wrote. More importantly, iQiyi’s debt and cash burn mean it needs new capital by no later than next quarter, the bank notes.Significantly, there’s a large amount of customer crossover, with about half of each service’s audience using the other, Nomura Holdings Inc. wrote, again citing QuestMobile. Nomura’s skepticism is warranted: After rivals Youku and Tudou merged (now simply called Youku and since acquired by Alibaba), the popularity of the Tudou platform dropped, likely due to overlap. This brings to mind the exit of ride-hailing service Uber Technologies Inc. from China in 2016. The American company’s local business was bought out by Didi in what was widely seen as a win for the Chinese player. The expectation was for market consolidation and a steady flow of profits. Uber left the country with a 20% share in Didi, which is now one of the world’s largest unicorns by value. The move allowed the U.S. firm to stop bleeding money while enjoying the upside of owning a stake in the business it surrendered to.Fast forward, though, and Didi is still struggling to get real pricing power — the key to boosting profitability. On a few occasions, it’s tried to raise prices in a city, only to have rival Meituan Dianping decide to open up ride-hailing there, forcing fares back down.This’s likely what would happen to a Tencent Video consolidation with iQiyi. They could merge their services completely, allowing deep cuts in content costs yet still taking a hit on subscription numbers. Or, they could divide and conquer (one covers sports and animation, the other drama and variety), but that would require almost as much video to be produced to keep the combined user base. Or, services could be bundled with a discount to users taking both; that would entail a loss of revenue.Even if the companies manage to pull off the technical, management and financial aspects of a merger, they still might not be able to control the market enough to assert power in the long term.The remaining entity would not only be competing with Alibaba’s Youku. It would also be squaring off against any provider of content that grabs the attention of consumers. Bytedance Inc.’s Douyin (the domestic version of TikTok) is gaining traction, while Tencent’s own gaming titles continue to eat up user time. Then there’s the very real possibility that a new entrant would come along and start things up all over again.Both Tencent and iQiyi might win the video-streaming battle by calling a truce with each other, but remember that the real winner of China’s taxi wars was the one that’s no longer in the fight. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • For Nomura's shoe-leather sales force, an uncertain future after coronavirus
    Reuters

    For Nomura's shoe-leather sales force, an uncertain future after coronavirus

    For years Nomura Holdings Inc has relied on an army of retail salespeople to peddle stocks and bonds to investors sitting on one of the world's largest pool of household savings, generating revenue even in the bleakest of markets. The crisis has only deepened concerns about the viability of Nomura's business model, which is more reliant on retail broking than rivals. For the last several years, Yorio Sawamoto, a 69-year-old small business owner in Osaka, has been trading with Nomura.

  • Alibaba and ByteDance Expand in Hong Kong as Banks Pull Back
    Bloomberg

    Alibaba and ByteDance Expand in Hong Kong as Banks Pull Back

    (Bloomberg) -- Chinese tech firms are expanding their footprint in Hong Kong even as the pandemic prompts some banks to consider scaling back in the world’s most expensive office market.TikTok owner ByteDance Ltd. and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. have signed leases to add office space in Hong Kong, according to people familiar with the matter who asked not to be identified as the matter is private.ByteDance took out a three-year lease on about 3,000 square feet (279 square meters) of space in Causeway Bay’s Times Square, according to a person familiar. Alibaba has also signed up for one more floor spanning approximately 17,000 square feet in the same building, one of the people said. The firm currently leases three floors and a dozen more units.Representatives for ByteDance and Alibaba declined to comment.The new leases underscore the twin tech giants’ ambition to broaden their global footprint, as growth in their home market slows. While ByteDance is looking for the next global hit to replicate TikTok’s success in online entertainment, Alibaba’s divisions including e-commerce and cloud computing are tapping overseas clients and customers.Bytedance’s valuation has surged to more than $100 billion in recent private share transactions, as investor confidence in the popular TikTok video platform grows. The company previously laid out an aggressive expansion plan of providing 40,000 new jobs in 2020. Those include two Hong Kong-based positions for crafting content policies, according to ByteDance’s job referral site.Bank OfficesThe expansion of the Chinese tech giants comes as some financial firms reassess their office needs with so many staff working from home. The city is also mired in its deepest recession on record, and faces growing tension over a new security law proposed by China.In March, Nomura Holdings Inc. said it will cut its space in Two International Finance Centre when a new lease takes effect at the start of 2021. Macquarie Group Ltd. is handing back space in One International Finance Centre that the Australian investment bank had sublet to a co-working provider.As companies look to cut costs, demand for office space has declined. The average vacancy rate across the city’s major business areas rose to 7.2% in April, the highest since October 2009, according to Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. Meanwhile, rents dropped 3% in April from March, the property agency said.Hong Kong’s Central district has the world’s highest rents for office space, averaging $313 per square foot, topping New York’s Midtown and London’s West End, data from JLL show.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nomura joins growing list of companies re-thinking offices post-COVID
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Nomura joins growing list of companies re-thinking offices post-COVID

    The chief executive of the Japanese investment bank said he would 'like to discuss' whether the bank now needed to much space in central Tokyo.

  • Nomura considers having fewer staff at headquarters permanently
    Reuters

    Nomura considers having fewer staff at headquarters permanently

    Nomura Holdings Inc <8604.T> is considering having fewer staff work at its Tokyo headquarters permanently now that the coronavirus pandemic has spurred a huge shift to remote working, its chief executive said. Around 80% of staff at Nomura's headquarters in the financial district of Otemachi have been working from home due to the outbreak. Japan's biggest investment bank and brokerage occupies most floors of the 22-storey Otemachi building, but it declined to specify how many people it employs there or what size of reduction in staff working at the offices it was looking at.

  • Nomura's New CEO to Boost Growth With Focus on Private Markets
    Zacks

    Nomura's New CEO to Boost Growth With Focus on Private Markets

    Nomura's (NMR) business strategy involves investments in private businesses and digitization in order to improve the company's prospects.

  • Nomura seeks new growth from private equity, private debt and startups
    Reuters

    Nomura seeks new growth from private equity, private debt and startups

    Nomura Holdings Inc <8604.T> said on Tuesday it planned to beef up business with unlisted companies, including offering advice to startups, aiming to diversify revenue after quarterly earnings took a battering from the coronavirus pandemic. Japanese biggest brokerage and investment bank said in a business strategy update it was seeking new growth in private equity, private debt and infrastructure, as well as in offerings of digital bonds and security tokens.

  • Nomura Holdings, Inc. (NMR) Q4 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Nomura Holdings, Inc. (NMR) Q4 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    Good day everyone and welcome to today's Nomura Holdings Fourth Quarter and Full-Year Operating Results for Fiscal Year Ended March 2020 Conference Call. This slide outlines some of the initiatives we have undertaken to help our employees, clients and communities.

  • Coronavirus: City bankers prepare to go to Basingstoke and Croydon
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: City bankers prepare to go to Basingstoke and Croydon

    The likes of Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Nomura, and Barclays have all been testing back-up offices in recent weeks as part of coronavirus prep work.

  • Goldman, Citi among banks curbing Italy trips over coronavirus fears - sources
    Reuters

    Goldman, Citi among banks curbing Italy trips over coronavirus fears - sources

    LONDON/MILAN (Reuters) - Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Citigroup Inc, Credit Suisse and other banks have curbed trips to Italy amid fears that the coronavirus outbreak across the north of the country could quickly spread across Europe, sources said. Lazard, BNP Paribas and Deutsche Bank also rushed to warn staff against all "non-essential travel" to northern Italy, four sources told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity as banking policies are confidential.

  • Goldman, Citi among banks curbing Italy trips over coronavirus fears
    Reuters

    Goldman, Citi among banks curbing Italy trips over coronavirus fears

    LONDON/MILAN (Reuters) - Goldman Sachs <GS.N>, Citigroup Inc <C.N>, Credit Suisse <CSGN.S> and other investment banks have curbed trips to Italy amid fears that the coronavirus outbreak across the north of the country could quickly spread across Europe, sources said. Lazard <LAZ.N>, BNP Paribas <BNPP.PA> and Deutsche Bank <DBKGn.DE> also rushed to warn staff against all "non-essential travel" to northern Italy, four sources told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity as banking policies are confidential.

  • Goldman (GS) Mulls to Offer Loans in Partnership With Amazon
    Zacks

    Goldman (GS) Mulls to Offer Loans in Partnership With Amazon

    Goldman Sachs (GS) might offer loans to small businesses through Amazon's lending platform.

  • Japan's Nomura posts fourth straight quarterly profit, led by wholesale business turnaround
    Reuters

    Japan's Nomura posts fourth straight quarterly profit, led by wholesale business turnaround

    Nomura Holdings Inc <8604.T>, Japan's biggest brokerage and investment bank, on Thursday posted its fourth straight quarterly profit, primarily due to a turnaround at its wholesale business serving businesses and institutional investors. Nomura, which is in the midst of a management reshuffle, had recorded a 95.3 billion yen net loss in the same period last year, its heaviest quarterly loss in nearly a decade, as it suffered a big write-off in its wholesale business. Pretax income for the wholesale segment came in at 43.2 billion yen for the three months through December compared with a 95.9 billion yen pretax loss a year ago.

  • Goldman Sachs (GS) on Hiring Spree, to Add 600 Jobs in China
    Zacks

    Goldman Sachs (GS) on Hiring Spree, to Add 600 Jobs in China

    In sync with Goldman Sachs' (GS) efforts to gain majority control in the joint venture and improve profitability, the bank announces plans to increase workforce in China.

  • Nomura sees hope in advisory, underwriting as rates stay low, society ages - outgoing CEO
    Reuters

    Nomura sees hope in advisory, underwriting as rates stay low, society ages - outgoing CEO

    Nomura Holdings cannot escape an ageing society or low interest rates, but the Japanese investment bank might be able to wring more money out of advisory and underwriting as it grapples with the long-term "megatrends", its outgoing chief executive said. The comments from Koji Nagai, Nomura's longest-serving CEO in three decades, underscore the deepening sense of crisis for Japan's top brokerage and investment bank amid a shrinking fee pool from trading that threatens financial services in the world's third-largest economy. Nagai is due to become Nomura's chairman in April and will be replaced by Kentaro Okuda, now co-chief operating officer, to lead a turnaround at the firm, which last year posted its first annual loss in a decade, has cut costs and also announced plans to shut 20% of its domestic retail branches.

  • BlackRock (BLK) to Expand in China With Majority Owned JV
    Zacks

    BlackRock (BLK) to Expand in China With Majority Owned JV

    BlackRock's (BLK) efforts to expand in China will help diversification, and lead to further top-line growth.

  • JPMorgan to Set up Majority-Owned Joint Venture in China
    Zacks

    JPMorgan to Set up Majority-Owned Joint Venture in China

    JPMorgan (JPM) receives final approval from regulators to set up a majority-owned securities joint venture in China.

  • Huntington Plans to Shutter Branches in Giant Eagle Stores
    Zacks

    Huntington Plans to Shutter Branches in Giant Eagle Stores

    In order to consolidate branch footprint, Huntington Bancshares (HBAN) plans to cut down number of branches by 30 in Giant Eagle Stores.

  • Nomura to Acquire Greentech Capital Advisors, Stock Down
    Zacks

    Nomura to Acquire Greentech Capital Advisors, Stock Down

    With an aim to enhance its global footprint, Japan-based Nomura (NMR) agreed to acquire Greentech Capital Advisors.

  • Japan's Nomura picks operations chief as new CEO to lead turnaround
    Reuters

    Japan's Nomura picks operations chief as new CEO to lead turnaround

    Nomura has picked joint operations chief Kentaro Okuda to lead a turnaround of Japan's biggest brokerage and investment bank, taking over from chief executive Koji Nagai, who will become chairman. The reshuffle was announced on Monday as Nomura posted its strongest quarterly profit in more than 17 years. With years of experience in investment banking, Okuda, 56, has also worked overseas, including as head of Nomura's U.S. arm.

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