VOD.L - Vodafone Group Plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
159.52
-0.88 (-0.55%)
At close: 4:35PM BST
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Previous close160.40
Open160.40
Bid160.16 x 0
Ask160.20 x 0
Day's range159.52 - 161.76
52-week range1.50 - 1,602.00
Volume125,871,859
Avg. volume79,994,238
Market cap42.701B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.40
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-28.20
Earnings date12 Nov 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.08 (5.01%)
Ex-dividend date2019-06-06
1y target est2.01
  • Why I’ve turned positive on the Vodafone share price
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I’ve turned positive on the Vodafone share price

    Buying the Vodafone (LON: VOD) share price could lock in an attractive dividend income, thinks Roland Head.

  • What’s next for the Vodafone share price and its 5.5% yield?
    Fool.co.uk

    What’s next for the Vodafone share price and its 5.5% yield?

    Rupert Hargreaves explains why Vodafone could be a great investment for shareholders seeking a steady income over the next five years.

  • Should we be worried about Vodafone's Quality Rank (LON:VOD)?
    Stockopedia

    Should we be worried about Vodafone's Quality Rank (LON:VOD)?

    Good quality companies can offer a lot of comfort to investors. They tend to be strong, stable, profitable firms that deliver predictable returns, have pricing8230;

  • Eco-Friendly Phone Companies Brace for 5G’s Energy Bill
    Bloomberg

    Eco-Friendly Phone Companies Brace for 5G’s Energy Bill

    (Bloomberg) -- The next generation of telecommunications technology could be the key to ending years of stagnation in the industry. But it’s also set to create a difficult dilemma for European phone companies.Carriers shelled out $80 billion to power the world’s antennas last year, according to Nokia Oyj. The prospect of having to raise spending on electricity – energy demand could triple with the introduction of 5G equipment, according to industry body GSMA – won’t sit well with phone companies that are already struggling to pay their dividends. At the same time, firms such as BT Group Plc and Vodafone Group Plc have pledged to slash emissions, and that will require a rapid shift to renewable energy.Just as carriers are about to roll out vast quantities of power-hungry gear, they’re also promising to save the planet. And funds are tight. Accomplishing everything at the same time could be a tall order.“If they have set up ambitious targets for overall power consumption and CO2 emissions, those could potentially be in conflict when they start to roll out 5G,” said Jerker Berglund, industry consultant at JB Sustainable Approach AB. “Reducing total power consumption is going to be a challenge.”5G could unleash a 1,000-fold jump in data demand for connecting factories and cars and supercharging mobile devices, according to the GSMA. That’s an irresistible sales prospect for a telecom industry whose revenues have yet to recover from a slump that started in 2015.Next-generation antennas and masts can be 10 times more energy efficient than 4G’s. However, these power savings could get swamped by the surge in demand for new applications. 5G will link up billions of things that have never been connected before. To accommodate all these new connections, masts might have as many as 128 antennas, versus just four or eight on a typical 4G mast. Bouncing signals through cities may require thousands of transmitters and receivers to be bolted onto rooftops and street furniture. This looks like it will all require a lot more bandwidth, and a lot more power.What’s more, carriers can’t afford the cost of swapping out all their equipment at once, Berglund said. The rollout will have to happen gradually, so many masts will still carry less efficient 4G, 3G and 2G antennas alongside 5G ones. This situation could last for years – some 3G kit is still in place 18 years after that technology was introduced.This article is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to highlight the climate change story.Electricity already makes up about a third of carriers’ average operational costs, according to Nokia, and raising this will pressure balance sheets when the industry isn’t in a good place to cope. Vodafone has cut its dividend to conserve cash to pay for spectrum and capital investment. Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts said Monday they expect BT to slash its dividend by as much as 40% to fund capital expenditure and price cuts.“As we consume more, power’s going up, and the industry is trying to bring that down as much as possible,” said Henry Calvert, head of future networks at the GSMA, the mobile industry trade body. “There’s a lot of activity in the industry about making the power we use more efficient.”But whatever fixes carriers make to lower energy bills – sharing networks, getting masts to autonomously power down at times of low data demand, introducing “beam-forming’’ so smart antennas can pinpoint devices instead of pumping out data indiscriminately – the surge in power usage creates a challenge for meeting emissions goals.Deutsche Telekom AG, for example, pledged a 90% reduction in carbon emissions between 2017 and 2030. In total, European carriers will have to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 6 million metric tons within 11 years to achieve their carbon targets, BloombergNEF analyst Kyle Harrison said in a research note.One solution is for the telecom companies to shift their power supply to renewables, but this can’t be done at the flick of a switch. Clean-energy contracts are complicated and can take years to negotiate.Carriers will be under pressure to sign new ones quickly to cope with 5G’s power demands, Harrison said. They’ll be vulnerable to striking bad deals, and price fluctuations in energy markets can turn some arrangements that initially look good into losers in the longer term. “The switch to 5G is going to put more pressure on telecoms to purchase clean energy and reduce their emissions,” he said. “Many clean energy deals can result in losses for corporations. Telecoms will need to put extra consideration into this as their power demand goes up, especially if losses will impact their investments into 5G.”To contact the author of this story: Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Vodafone Group Introduces TiVo’s Personalized Content Discovery Platform

    IBC — TiVo (NASDAQ: TIVO), the company that brings entertainment together, today announced that Vodafone Group is deploying TiVo’s Personalized Content Discovery (PCD) to deliver engaging, highly-relevant entertainment experiences to its subscribers. Vodafone is introducing PCD as part of the new Vodafone TV service in Portugal, the first country to deploy its new “Intelligent Voice Search” feature.

  • Australian watchdog hurt competition by barring Vodafone, TPG merger: telcos
    Reuters

    Australian watchdog hurt competition by barring Vodafone, TPG merger: telcos

    Australia's antitrust regulator has hurt competition by blocking a A$15 billion ($10 billion) merger between the nation's third- and fourth-largest telecoms providers, the companies said in court on Tuesday as their legal appeal got underway. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) opposed in May a combination of TPG Telecom Ltd and the local joint venture of Britain's Vodafone Group PLC on the grounds it would eliminate a potential fourth mobile network competitor. A coming together of the companies would actually encourage competition but "the pro-competitive effects of this merger are imperiled by the ACCC's opposition to it", Vodafone lawyer Peter Brereton said.

  • Australian watchdog hurt competition by barring Vodafone, TPG merger-telcos
    Reuters

    Australian watchdog hurt competition by barring Vodafone, TPG merger-telcos

    Australia's antitrust regulator has hurt competition by blocking a A$15 billion ($10 billion) merger between the nation's third- and fourth-largest telecoms providers, the companies said in court on Tuesday as their legal appeal got underway. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) opposed in May a combination of TPG Telecom Ltd and the local joint venture of Britain's Vodafone Group PLC on the grounds it would eliminate a potential fourth mobile network competitor. A coming together of the companies would actually encourage competition but "the pro-competitive effects of this merger are imperilled by the ACCC's opposition to it", Vodafone lawyer Peter Brereton said.

  • Why I think the Vodafone share price could be set for a rebound
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think the Vodafone share price could be set for a rebound

    Here's why I think Vodafone Group plc (LSE: VOD) shares could be set for sustainable long-term growth.

  • Why the Vodafone share price rose 4% in August
    Fool.co.uk

    Why the Vodafone share price rose 4% in August

    August saw the Vodafone Group plc (LON:VOD) share price return to levels previously seen at the start of the year, let's consider why.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Italy approves use of special powers over 5G supply deals

    Italy's new government on Thursday approved its use of special powers in supply deals for fifth-generation (5G) telecom services by a number of domestic firms with providers including China's Huawei and ZTE Corporation. A government source told Reuters at the time the decision to strengthen Rome's so-called "golden powers" reflected concerns over the potential involvement of Chinese equipment makers Huawei and ZTE in the development of 5G networks. The United States has lobbied Italy and other European allies to stay clear of Huawei equipment and to also pay close scrutiny to ZTE, saying the vendors could pose a security risk.

  • Are Investors Undervaluing Vodafone Group Plc (LON:VOD) By 49%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Are Investors Undervaluing Vodafone Group Plc (LON:VOD) By 49%?

    Today we'll do a simple run through of a valuation method used to estimate the attractiveness of Vodafone Group Plc...

  • 2 FTSE 100 dividends I believe could be cut in 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 dividends I believe could be cut in 2020

    Dividends from British Gas owner Centrica plc (LON:CNA) and telecoms giant Vodafone Group plc (LON: VOD) could both be on the edge next year.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Mobile phone sales plunge at Britain's Dixons Carphone

    Britain's Dixons Carphone on Thursday reported another big fall in mobile phone sales in its latest quarter, though it maintained its financial guidance for the full 2019-20 year. The group, which trades as Currys, PC World and Carphone Warehouse in the UK, said like-for-like sales in its UK & Ireland mobile phones division fell 10% in the 13 weeks to July 27, its fiscal first quarter. Dixons Carphone has been hurt by a shift in the mobile phone market as customers keep their handsets for longer, choose cheaper SIM-only deals, and turn to more flexible credit-based offers.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Deutsche Telekom 5G network goes live in 5 German cities

    Deutsche Telekom said on Thursday its 5G mobile network had gone live in five German cities, timing the launch for maximum impact on the opening day of the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin. The German market leader paid 2.2 billion euros ($2.5 billion) for 5G spectrum at a recent auction and the regulator has just unlocked access to the 3.6 Gigahertz band that will power its initial 5G offering. Berlin, Munich, Cologne, Bonn and Darmstadt now offer local 5G services with bandwidth of up to 1 gigabit per second - fast enough to download a movie onto a smartphone in a few seconds.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Deutsche Telekom 5G network goes live in 5 German cities

    Deutsche Telekom said on Thursday its 5G mobile network had gone live in five German cities, timing the launch for maximum impact on the opening day of the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin. Berlin, Munich, Cologne, Bonn and Darmstadt now offer local 5G services with bandwidth of up to 1 gigabit per second - fast enough to download a movie onto a smartphone in a few seconds. Hamburg and Leipzig will follow by the end of the year, with 20 German cities to be covered through 2020, Deutsche Telekom said in a statement.

  • Bloomberg

    Infobip Taps Ex-Banker as CFO as IPO, Stake Sale Plans Loom

    (Bloomberg) -- Infobip Ltd., a Croatian software supplier for companies including Uber Technologies Inc, has tapped a former investment banker as chief financial officer as it weighs an initial public offering.Mario Baburic is to take up the role that wasn’t covered at the company, effective immediately, according to a statement from the Croatian firm. Previously, Baburic headed corporate finance operations for UniCredit SpA’s Croatian unit until 2012 and then moved on to run global business development at Podravka, a Croatian food producer. He also founded Creative Fields Holding, a technology startup.Infobip is considering holding an IPO in New York, while also looking at other options to raise cash as it eyes expansion in the U.S., Chief Executive Officer Silvio Kutic said in August.The company provides corporations with technology to send notifications to customers through different channels, such as WhatsApp or text message. Among other things, the technology allows companies to mask contact details between employees and customers. Infobip clients include Vodafone Group Plc and Costco Wholesale Corp.To contact the reporter on this story: Rodrigo Orihuela in Madrid at rorihuela@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • I believe these ‘5G’ stocks are set to sky-rocket in the next few years
    Fool.co.uk

    I believe these ‘5G’ stocks are set to sky-rocket in the next few years

    5G should be revolutionary for mobile networks and I’m thinking of investing now before these stocks soar.

  • 3 reasons why the Vodafone share price could keep crashing
    Fool.co.uk

    3 reasons why the Vodafone share price could keep crashing

    Shares in Vodafone Group plc (LON: VOD) have been a terrible investment over the past few years, and there's a good chance the stock could continue to decline, according to Rupert Hargreaves.

  • One FTSE 100 company that I would add to my retirement portfolio and one I would stay away from
    Fool.co.uk

    One FTSE 100 company that I would add to my retirement portfolio and one I would stay away from

    Shares of Vodafone Group plc (LON: VOD) look attractive right now while those of National Grid plc (LON: NG) look risky to me.

  • Vodafone UK appeals move to ease price caps on BT business lines
    Reuters

    Vodafone UK appeals move to ease price caps on BT business lines

    Vodafone UK is seeking to overturn a move by regulator Ofcom to relax restrictions on how much BT can charge for business fiber connections, saying it will result in higher bills for companies, universities and hospitals. Ofcom had already eased price regulation in central London in a review in 2016, saying BT did not have significant market power. It has now relaxed the restrictions in other cities where BT faces two or more rivals, such as Birmingham, Bristol, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds and Manchester.

  • U.S. Firms Steer Clear of Europe's Big Mobile Tower Sell-Off
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Firms Steer Clear of Europe's Big Mobile Tower Sell-Off

    (Bloomberg) -- European phone companies are selling their mobile masts and growth-hungry U.S. tower companies have money to spend -- it looks like a marriage made in heaven.Instead, firms like American Tower Corp. and Crown Castle International Corp. are largely staying away, making it easier for Spain’s Cellnex Telecom SA and infrastructure funds managed by Macquarie Group Ltd., KKR & Co. and others to sweep up the region’s tower assets.Their hesitation is driven partly by price: the global hunt for yield has driven up the premium for these assets, which offer reliable, steady income streams. Independent tower companies also won’t pay top dollar unless they see a path to significant revenue growth -- and that’s where they have a problem with Europe.“The American tower companies say, ‘OK, Europe is fine at the right price, but prices are not where we need them to be, so we think the opportunities elsewhere are more attractive,”’ said Nick Del Deo, senior analyst at U.S. research firm MoffettNathanson.Tens of thousands of European masts are expected to see ownership changes in the next two years as companies such as Iliad SA, Vodafone Group Plc and Telecom Italia SpA bring in new investors to reduce debt and share the heavy cost of rolling out 5G technology.But only a quarter are likely to end up with independent operators, according to TowerXchange. Vodafone and CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd. are creating separate units for almost 90,000 towers and the consultancy expects them to maintain control over those businesses. That’s a turn-off for independent companies, which try to maximize revenue by leasing mast space to as many network operators as possible.Many European carriers want to keep some hold on their towers because they see mobile infrastructure as a strategic asset that can help them manage costs and perhaps gain a competitive edge. They’re also mindful of what happened in the U.S., where operators rushed to sell their towers more than a decade ago only to find themselves stuck with a big bill for leases and capacity rights.Vodafone Surges on Possible IPO, Stake Sale of Towers UnitVodafone and Telefonica Ink 5G Terms in Move to U.K. Tower SalesNiel Agrees to $3 Billion of Phone Tower Sales to CellnexCK Hutchison to Separate Out European Phone Towers BusinessSelling full ownership of towers to independent players can spur innovation and reduce expenses by encouraging carriers to share infrastructure, avoiding costly duplication. European carriers’ insistence on maintaining control means the continent’s progress in rolling out 5G will likely continue to be slower compared to the U.S., where towers are largely in independent hands.“There is a risk that the European carriers go too far the other way,” Del Deo said. “The captive tower model, if you look globally, has never proven to be that effective.”For now, American Tower is mostly relying on building towers in Africa, Latin America and India for its international growth.Crown Castle didn’t respond to a request for comment on its future European asset bidding plans. American Tower declined to comment. Its chief executive officer, James Taiclet, told analysts last month that recent large European tower sales didn’t meet its bar for growth prospects and asset costs.Here are some other reasons why U.S. tower firms aren’t piling into Europe:Redundancy: Europe has more cases of towers operated by rival carriers sitting in close proximity. An independent owner may want to remove one to cut costs, but the tower often comes with a ground lease that they must keep paying for years.Less Potential: Europe has lots of rooftop antenna sites, which can’t accommodate as many customers as can a ground-based tower. Many European portfolios include broadcast towers in rural areas that may not be as valuable as mobile towers.Radio Emission Rules: In some countries, rules on maximum electromagnetic radio emissions limit the number of antennas a tower firm can install at a single site.\--With assistance from Scott Moritz.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Pfeiffer in London at tpfeiffer3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kenneth Wong at kwong11@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Ryan, Anthony PalazzoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Forget Bitcoin! I’d aim to get rich and retire early with these 2 FTSE 100 dividend shares
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget Bitcoin! I’d aim to get rich and retire early with these 2 FTSE 100 dividend shares

    I think these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks could offer income potential and turnaround possibilities.

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