VOD.L - Vodafone Group Plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
153.24
+1.12 (+0.74%)
At close: 4:38PM GMT
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Previous close152.12
Open152.62
Bid153.16 x 0
Ask153.20 x 0
Day's range152.06 - 155.16
52-week range122.22 - 171.78
Volume60,744,700
Avg. volume76,947,687
Market cap41.02B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.59
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-28.20
Earnings date12 Nov 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.08 (4.96%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-28
1y target est2.01
  • Vodafone, Bharti Airtel to Hike Prices in India
    Bloomberg

    Vodafone, Bharti Airtel to Hike Prices in India

    Nov.19 -- Vodafone Idea Ltd. and rival Bharti Airtel Ltd. are set to raise mobile tariffs from next month, the first increase since the entry of billionaire Mukesh Ambani into India’s telecommunications market three years ago caused a price war. P R Sanjai reports on "Bloomberg Markets: Asia."

  • Bloomberg

    Google Wins Vodafone Data Deal in Battle With Amazon, Microsoft

    (Bloomberg) -- Google is taking over a chunk of Vodafone Group Plc’s data operations to help the world’s second-biggest mobile phone company identify cost savings using artificial intelligence.Vodafone will shift data processing and storage from its own premises to Google’s cloud and use Google’s real-time analysis tools to develop new services for business clients and streamline the carrier’s operations in 24 countries, the companies told Bloomberg.It will become “the brains of our business as we transform ourselves into a digital tech company,” said Simon Harris, Vodafone’s head of big data delivery.Alphabet Inc.’s Google is vying with Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. for dominance in data centers and cloud computing. Vodafone has launched an internal platform dubbed “Neuron” to aggregate and crunch the ocean of data from its customers and networks. Chief Technology Officer Johan Wibergh said Vodafone can’t do that without Google’s capabilities.The companies didn’t give the price of the contract.Many phone companies are closing their aging data centers and outsourcing the work to a new generation of huge server farms developed by U.S. tech giants. Telecom Italia SpA has partnered with Google to sell cloud and edge computing services to corporate clients. Britain’s BT Group Plc is shifting from owning its data infrastructure to partnering with tech giants and selling complementary services such as system integration and cybersecurity.The Google deal is much more cost-effective than trying to build the same technological tools in-house, said Wibergh by phone. Vodafone is not selling its own data centers as they are still being used for other things, he added.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Thomas Pfeiffer, Jennifer RyanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • You’ve played the Lottery for 25 years and still aren’t rich! Here’s a better way to make a million
    Fool.co.uk

    You’ve played the Lottery for 25 years and still aren’t rich! Here’s a better way to make a million

    The National Lottery is 25 years old. Harvey Jones says you'd be better off playing the stock market.

  • Bloomberg

    Vodafone Idea, Bharti Surge on Plan to Raise Mobile Tariffs

    (Bloomberg) -- Shares of Vodafone Idea Ltd. and rival Bharti Airtel Ltd. rallied after the wireless carriers said they planned to raise tariffs starting next month, the first increase since the entry of billionaire Mukesh Ambani into India’s telecommunications market in 2016 triggered a price war.Vodafone Idea surged as much as 30% in Mumbai on Tuesday, while Bharti Airtel rallied as much as 6.6%. Reliance Industries Ltd.’s shares rose more than 3% to a record on optimism Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd. will also benefit from higher tariffs. “Mobile data charges in India are by far the cheapest in the world even as the demand for mobile data services continues to grow rapidly,” Vodafone Idea, formed by the merger of Vodafone Group Plc’s local unit with billionaire Kumar Mangalam Birla’s Idea Cellular Ltd., said in a statement late Monday. Higher rates will become effective Dec. 1, it said.Separately, a Vodafone Idea spokesman declined to disclose details about the possible tariff increase and plan details. The move comes after the wireless carrier reported the worst quarterly loss in Indian corporate history last week. The announcement of the increase was followed by Bharti Airtel, which also said it will raise phone rates from next month.Vodafone Idea last week took a one-time charge related to a $4 billion demand from the government, leading to a net loss of 509 billion rupees ($7.1 billion) in the September quarter. Saddled with about $14 billion of net debt, Vodafone Idea is fighting for survival after India’s top court last month ordered it and others including Bharti Airtel to pay fees that the government said were due from prior years.Indian telecom companies have been faced with high debt and low prices especially after the entry of Jio. That drove some to bankruptcy and led to the merger of others such as Vodafone with Idea. The acute stress in the sector has been acknowledged by all stakeholders and a high-level government panel is looking into providing appropriate relief, Vodafone Idea said Monday.“The key will be Jio’s response to the price hike. We think Jio could likely follow,” Jefferies analysts wrote in a note. Reliance has potential to gain from already above average valuation, thanks to the possibility of higher telecom tariffs and its debt reduction plans, Morgan Stanley analysts wrote.(Adds Reliance shares in second paragraph, analysts comments in last)To contact the reporters on this story: P R Sanjai in Mumbai at psanjai@bloomberg.net;Swansy Afonso in Mumbai at safonso2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, Abhay Singh, Ravil ShirodkarFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Italy's Inwit to pay 0.5936 euro dividend in TIM, Vodafone mobile mast merger

    INWIT, the mast group controlled by Telecom Italia, said on Monday it would pay a special dividend of 0.5936 euros per share once a merger of its assets with the Italian mobile towers of Vodafone is completed. Telecom Italia (TIM) and Vodafone agreed earlier this year to merge their mobile tower infrastructures and to jointly roll out 5G in Italy. In a statement on Monday INWIT said its board had approved the merger plan and had set a date of December 19 for a shareholder meeting to sign off on the deal.

  • In the Age of 5G, the Hottest Telecom Assets Are ... Towers
    Bloomberg

    In the Age of 5G, the Hottest Telecom Assets Are ... Towers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There are plenty of reasons Deutsche Telekom AG and Vodafone Group Plc make for uneasy bedfellows. But if Europe’s biggest telecommunications firms can overcome their differences, they would benefit from forging a strong alliance for one of their biggest cost centers: towers.The structures on which mobile operators install their antennas have generated a flurry of dealmaking as valuations soar and European carriers sense an opportunity to reduce debt and costs. By some estimates, towers account for a third of total capital expenditures. Since July, more than $8 billion of deals have been announced in Europe.Sexy they are not. Yet towers are critical vertebrae for wireless networks, and are ever more in demand with the advent of 5G networks. The new technology, which promises to transmit bigger gobs of data at faster speeds, will depend on antennas with a shorter range than previous generations because of the spectrum of bandwidth being used. That means more towers will be needed to post more antennas at closer intervals to power a network, making it increasingly attractive for operators to share them.With that in mind, Vodafone is already separating out its towers arm. An umbrella company will hold the stakes in its U.K. joint venture with the local unit of Madrid-based Telefonica SA, as well as a combination in Italy with Telecom Italia SpA’s Inwit subsidiary, pending regulatory approval. Options are being evaluated for Vodafone’s similar assets across the rest of Europe. Germany is at the top of the list.Just last week, Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone and Telefonica agreed to work together to build as many as 6,000 mobile sites in a bid to cut costs. They could do more, and merging Vodafone’s towers with those of Deutsche Telekom, the larger rival, would make the most sense for both parties. The former German national carrier has intimated it’s open to “possible scenarios,” especially given the German government’s ambitious target of having 98% of German homes, every highway and all federal roads equipped with download speeds of 100 megabits per second by the end of 2022.The timing isn’t perfect. The two firms’ rivalry is intensifying in Germany after the British firm agreed to buy Liberty Global Plc’s local cable assets for 19 billion euros ($16.5 billion). In trying to stymie the deal, Deutsche Telekom Chief Executive Officer Tim Hoettges questioned the implications that foreign ownership of major television assets would have for German democracy.But a towers tie-up could yield three major benefits: It would reduce debt, underpin an improved sum-of-the-parts valuation, and cut exposure to major capital expenditures over the next decade. Hoettges teased the idea at a conference in Barcelona last week, saying, “I’m ready for an IPO, I’m ready for a partnership — if we find one.”Mimicking Vodafone’s Italian deal would be sensible. There, Vodafone had the more valuable assets, so it received a 2.1 billion-euro cash payment and a 37.5% stake in the firm, Inwit. Telecom Italia has a holding of the same size, with the remaining 30% publicly traded.In Germany, Deutsche Telekom would expect to receive the cash payment. It has 9,000 towers, and Vodafone just 4,000. And since towers companies can sustain higher levels of debt, that money needn’t come from Vodafone itself. The new firm’s higher leverage capacity might be able to fund the deal.With the cash, Deutsche Telekom could reduce its net debt, which is set to jump significantly when U.S. subsidiary T-Mobile U.S. Inc. seals the $58 billion acquisition of Sprint Corp., expected early next year. That will push debt above Deutsche Telekom’s target ratio, Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Aidan Cheslin estimates.The value of the new towers company could approach 15 billion euros, based on earnings estimates and peer valuations. By selling a minority stake to the public market, Vodafone and Deutsche Telekom would be able to raise more capital and highlight value of the towers businessThe main reason not to merge the operations — being able to brag your network is better than someone else’s — is meanwhile eroding, given the network-sharing agreement reached last week.The biggest hurdle to a deal might be antitrust concerns. But other deals that seemed a gamble — such as Deutsche Telekom merging its Dutch business with the that of Swedish rival Tele2 AB — have been cleared. The pace of towers combinations is accelerating. France’s Orange SA has hinted it’s also evaluating its infrastructure assets, and will reveal more details Dec. 4. Europe’s two biggest telecoms giants should do so too, and together.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 stocks I’d buy in December, including Vodafone
    Fool.co.uk

    3 stocks I’d buy in December, including Vodafone

    With a General Election and Christmas fast approaching, I'm consider which stocks look a good buy for my Christmas stocking.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    EXPLAINER-What's behind Labour's plan to overhaul BT and the British broadband network?

    Britain's opposition Labour Party says if it wins the Dec. 12 election it will nationalise BT's broadband network and provide free internet for all within a decade, a radical election pledge to roll back decades of private ownership. The UK's biggest broadband and mobile phone provider was the flagship of Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's policy of selling state-owned assets, a political revolution that she said would improve efficiency and "spread the nation's wealth among as many people as possible".

  • Jeremy Corbyn Wants to Nationalize the Internet
    Bloomberg

    Jeremy Corbyn Wants to Nationalize the Internet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party is behind in the polls for the U.K. election so it’s unsurprising that he’s chucking out more giveaways to voters. The policy to nationalize BT Group Plc’s fixed-telecoms networks business and provide free fiber broadband to every British household is a humdinger nonetheless.Of course, the chances of this becoming reality are slim given that Corbyn’s best hope of becoming prime minister is a coalition with more moderate political parties. Yet the idea has stimulated even more debate than Labour’s previous plans to re-nationalize the railways and the energy utilities, so it’s at least worth thinking about. Taking it at face value, the policy would be a huge mistake that would achieve the opposite of its stated aim of accelerating Britain’s sluggish rollout of fiber broadband.First, there’s the cost. A Labour government would add 15 billion pounds ($19 billion) to an existing 5 billion pound broadband spending pot, according to Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell. Even assuming that would cover the required capital expenditure — a big assumption — it would cost at least the same again to nationalize Openreach, BT’s networks division.McDonnell says the state would pay for the acquisition by giving BT’s shareholders government bonds as compensation. Yet why would investors, especially those outside the U.K. protected by treaties against asset expropriation, exchange an 8.1% annual dividend yield from their BT stock for the less than 1% returns from U.K. gilts? The network spending itself would be funded by an increased tax on the likes of Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. But the G-20 will probably adopt new international tax standards next year to try to curb Big Tech’s avoidance tactics. So a Labour government might not even be able to whomp up these levies without breaching the new guidelines.Then there’s the speed of rolling out the networks. While the U.K. is well behind the pace on high-speed broadband rollout (it’s 10th in the European Union’s 2019 connectivity rankings), a tortured nationalization process isn’t the answer. BT would have no incentive to keep investing during that period.The same’s true for private competitors such as John Malone’s Virgin Media, Vodafone Group Plc and Comcast Corp.’s Sky. Increased competition has at least accelerated the pace of the rollout: The proportion of homes with fiber access has doubled in two years.Infrastructure investors have also been attracted by the returns promised by fiber, prompting a flurry of investment from KKR & Co., Macquarie’s infrastructure fund and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. McDonnell’s comments have certainly caused some consternation. TalkTalk Telecom Group Plc. said it had paused talks to sell a fiber project, for which Goldman-backed CityFibre Ltd. was the lead bidder. Should Labour ever get the chance to offer free broadband to everyone through a state-owned provider, tens of thousands of private sector jobs would be jeopardized. How would other companies be able to compete?And full-fiber broadband might not even really be necessary. The adoption of next-generation 5G mobile networks promises the ability to transmit far more data at far greater speeds. That would make fiber to every home redundant in parts of the country.There are better and more thoughtful ways to get fiber installed sooner: Making it easier to get permits to build the network; permanently reducing business tax rates for new fiber; and making it obligatory for customers to accept fiber upgrades. If McDonnell is willing to hand over 15 billion pounds to BT shareholders to snap up Openreach, why not use the funds to subsidize the rollout directly?To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How should I invest £10k? The 3 shares I’d buy today
    Fool.co.uk

    How should I invest £10k? The 3 shares I’d buy today

    These FTSE 100 dividend stocks could help you build a retirement fund, says Roland Head.

  • Vodafone Italy head says a single network should not be controlled by Telecom Italia
    Reuters

    Vodafone Italy head says a single network should not be controlled by Telecom Italia

    A merger of telephone networks in Italy is something that can be considered as long as control does not end up with Telecom Italia (TIM) , the head of Vodafone's Italian operations said on Friday. TIM is pressing ahead with plans to find investors to help it fund a tie-up with smaller broadband rival Open Fibre to create a single national fibre network player.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Politics drives domestic shares higher; FTSE cheers trade signs

    London's mid-cap index outperformed its European counterparts on Friday after the Brexit Party lent further clarity ahead of the Dec. 12 election, while hopes that a U.S.-China may be imminent helped the FTSE 100 eke out gains. The FTSE 250 advanced 0.9% as domestically-focused stocks rose after Nigel Farage's party stood down from more seats not held by the Conservative Party, which could help Tories gain a majority in the upcoming election.

  • Vodafone India Unit Pleads for Relief After $7 Billion Loss
    Bloomberg

    Vodafone India Unit Pleads for Relief After $7 Billion Loss

    (Bloomberg) -- After posting the worst quarterly loss in India’s corporate history, Vodafone Group Plc’s besieged local venture is appealing for urgent relief from the government to help avert a collapse.Vodafone Idea Ltd. took a one-time charge related to a $4 billion demand from the government for overdue fees, leading to a net loss of 509 billion rupees ($7.1 billion) in the three months through September, the company reported Thursday after the market closed.Formed by the merger of the U.K.-based firm’s local unit with billionaire Kumar Mangalam Birla’s Idea Cellular Ltd., hasn’t reported a profit since the deal was announced in 2017.“The company’s ability to continue as going concern is dependent on obtaining the reliefs from the government,” Vodafone Idea said in a statement late Thursday. It is “in active discussions with the government seeking financial relief,” it said.India to Consider Relief Measures for Its Ailing Telecom SectorSaddled with $14 billion of net debt, Vodafone Idea is fighting for survival after India’s top court last month ordered it to pay fees the government said were due from prior years. Vodafone Chief Executive Officer Nick Read told reporters this week in London that the situation was “critical” and unless India eases off on its demands, the venture may be headed for liquidation.Rival Bharti Airtel Ltd. also posted a record net loss on Thursday after market hours, highlighting the financial stress of Indian operators stuck with high levels of debt while facing a price war unleashed by billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd. and more recently, the adverse court verdict on fees.Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea shares gained Friday in Mumbai trading on optimism the government may provide help for the companies and as operating results showed some strength.A government panel is considering deferring payments due by March 2021 and March 2022, an official said last month. It will also consider cutting spectrum fees and other charges, said another official, who asked not to be identified, citing disclosure rules.Bharti Airtel’s shares rose as much as 9.1% Friday, while its 5.65% perpetual notes also advanced. The company’s “mobile performance was robust,” and grew from the preceding quarter, Saurabh Handa, an analyst with Citigroup Inc. in Mumbai wrote in a report. Vodafone Idea climbed as much as 10%, after dropping as much as 19% earlier in the day.In its Oct. 24 verdict, the Supreme Court of India ruled in favor of the government’s method of calculating operators’ revenue, a decision that means carriers must pay about $13 billion combined -- mostly license and spectrum fees built up over years. Bharti Airtel owes $3 billion, while Reliance Jio needs to pay 130 million rupees, the least, since it has only been in business since 2016.The finance ministry won’t back down from collecting the amount, which needs to be paid within three months as per the court order, an official with knowledge of the matter said this month.The demands comes as Vodafone Idea and Bharti Airtel faces intense competitive pressure from Jio, which swept into the No. 1 spot by users earlier this year. The upstart controlled by Asia’s richest man barreled into India’s wireless market three years ago with free calls and cheap data, acquiring about 380 million users.Jio’s entry drove some incumbents to bankruptcy, while others like Vodafone and Idea merged. But the pressure on earnings continued.Bharti Airtel, whose parent counts Singapore Telecommunications Ltd. as an investor, had a net loss of 230.4 billion rupees for three months ended September, it reported Thursday. Billionaire Sunil Mittal is also one of Bharti Airtel’s biggest investors.Losses at Bharti Airtel forced SingTel to also make such a hefty provision that it slipped into a quarterly loss for the first time.Vodafone Idea said Thursday it took a one-time charge of 256.8 billion rupees.‘Fragile State’Bharti Airtel continues to engage with the government, Gopal Vittal, the company’s chief executive officer for India and South Asia operations, said in a statement.“We are hopeful that the government will take a considerate view in this matter given the fragile state of the industry,” said Vittal.To ease the pressure on its Indian venture’s finances, Newbury, U.K.-based Vodafone, which owns about 45%, has said it wants a two-year delay on spectrum payments and lower license fees and taxes. It’s also called for the bandwidth fees demanded by the court to be spread over 10 years.“If you don’t get the remedies being suggested, the situation is critical,” Vodafone CEO Read said on Nov. 12. “If you’re not a going concern, you’re moving into a liquidation scenario -- can’t get any clearer than that.”Opt For InsolvencyEarlier, Read said Vodafone would refrain from plowing more money into India. The other venture’s other partner, Birla, won’t inject fresh equity and will opt for insolvency if the government doesn’t provide relief, the Economic Times reported Thursday, citing people it didn’t identify.For its part, Reliance Jio has insisted its two smaller rivals can and should pay up on time.India had a dozen independent carriers two years ago, and just three non-state operators are left standing today. The only clear winner has been Jio, which is backed by the deep pockets of Ambani’s sprawling energy-to-petrochemicals empire.(Updates with gain in shares in third paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: P R Sanjai in Mumbai at psanjai@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, ;Arijit Ghosh at aghosh@bloomberg.net, Dave McCombs, Bhuma ShrivastavaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 7-UK's Labour plans high-speed connection to voter hearts with BT nationalisation

    Britain's opposition Labour Party plans to nationalise BT's broadband network to provide free internet for all if it wins power, making a radical election pledge to roll back 35 years of private ownership that caught both the company and its shareholders by surprise. Labour's proposed overhaul of the telecoms infrastructure, an addition to its already broad nationalisation plan, would be paid for by raising taxes on tech firms such as Alphabet's Google, Amazon and Facebook and using its Green Transformation fund. The announcement by Labour, which is currently lagging Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Conservatives in opinion polls ahead of the Dec. 12 election, sent BT's shares down as much as 3.7%, wiping nearly half a billion pounds off its market value.

  • Telecom Italia aims to sell stake in Vodafone Italian tower tie-up - CEO
    Reuters

    Telecom Italia aims to sell stake in Vodafone Italian tower tie-up - CEO

    Telecom Italia (TIM) plans to sell a stake in the mobile mast business it is creating in Italy with rival Vodafone to infrastructure funds, the Italian group's chief executive said on Thursday. The two companies agreed in July to merge their Italian mobile assets under the INWIT business that is currently 60%-owned by TIM. The deal is awaiting European Union antitrust approval and is expected to wrap up in the first half of 2020, INWIT's chief executive said last week.

  • Telecom Italia aims to sell stake in Vodafone Italian tower tie-up: CEO
    Reuters

    Telecom Italia aims to sell stake in Vodafone Italian tower tie-up: CEO

    Telecom Italia (TIM) plans to sell a stake in the mobile mast business it is creating in Italy with rival Vodafone to infrastructure funds, the Italian group's chief executive said on Thursday. The two companies agreed in July to merge their Italian mobile assets under the INWIT business that is currently 60%-owned by TIM. The deal is awaiting European Union antitrust approval and is expected to wrap up in the first half of 2020, INWIT's chief executive said last week.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Vodafone Idea makes $7 bln loss after provisions for govt dues

    Indian mobile carrier Vodafone Idea on Thursday reported the biggest quarterly loss in India's corporate history after making provisions for outstanding government dues. Vodafone Idea, made up of the local unit of Vodafone Group Plc and billionaire Kumar Mangalam Birla's Idea Cellular, reported a consolidated net loss of 509 billion rupees ($7.13 billion) in the second quarter to September. The company took a charge of 256.78 billion rupees for the quarter after India's Supreme Court last month upheld a demand by the telecoms department that wireless carriers pay 920 billion rupees in overdue levies and interest.

  • Do I still think the Vodafone share price could double your money?
    Fool.co.uk

    Do I still think the Vodafone share price could double your money?

    G A Chester has been bullish on Vodafone and a small-cap tech firm, but after strong gains would he now buy, sell, or hold these stocks?

  • Vodafone Idea makes $7 billion loss after provisions for government dues
    Reuters

    Vodafone Idea makes $7 billion loss after provisions for government dues

    Indian mobile carrier Vodafone Idea on Thursday reported the biggest quarterly loss in India's corporate history after making provisions for outstanding government dues. Vodafone Idea, made up of the local unit of Vodafone Group Plc and billionaire Kumar Mangalam Birla's Idea Cellular, reported a consolidated net loss of 509 billion rupees ($7.13 billion) in the second quarter to September. The company took a charge of 256.78 billion rupees for the quarter after India's Supreme Court last month upheld a demand by the telecoms department that wireless carriers pay 920 billion rupees in overdue levies and interest.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    India's Vodafone Idea loss widens to $7 bln on outstanding govt dues

    India's Vodafone Idea Ltd said on Thursday its consolidated net loss in the second quarter widened to 509.22 billion rupees ($7.14 billion), as the company made provisions for potential outstanding payments to the federal government. The company took a charge of 256.78 billion rupees for the quarter to the end of September after India's Supreme Court upheld a demand by the telecoms department that wireless carriers pay 920 billion rupees in overdue levies and interest. Analysts on average expected the company to report a consolidated net loss of 44.22 billion rupees for the quarter, according to Refinitiv data, although those figures did not include the charge.

  • Should we be worried about Vodafone's Quality Rank (LON:VOD)?
    Stockopedia

    Should we be worried about Vodafone's Quality Rank (LON:VOD)?

    Good quality companies can offer a lot of comfort to investors. They tend to be strong, stable, profitable firms that deliver predictable returns, have pricing8230;

  • Telefonica COO supports consolidation in Spanish telecom crowd
    Reuters

    Telefonica COO supports consolidation in Spanish telecom crowd

    A top official at Telefonica said on Wednesday he would support consolidation in Spain's fiercely competitive telecommunications market, where takeover speculation has been rife. The telecoms market in the euro zone's fourth-largest economy has become ever-more crowded, squeezing profits and prompting British peer Vodafone to propose cutting up to one fifth of its workforce there. "We would be supportive of consolidation of the Spanish market if that scenario were to take place," Chief Operating Officer Angel Vila told the Morgan Stanley European Technology, Media and Telecoms conference in Barcelona.

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