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Meta reports key advancements in AI and robotics

Yahoo Finance Live discusses Meta’s reports highlighting the company’s latest key advancements in artificial intelligence learning.

Video transcript

ALLIE GARFINKLE: Now we're going to go on to my pick, which is Meta. The company's AI unit released some key research today illustrating advances in applying AI to robots. Some of the most challenging problems in AI involve things like balance and coordination. Things like how can you teach an AI-based machine to learn from the environment around it? And Meta, in its case, says it's starting to answer some of these big questions by building systems that allow robots to learn from both real and simulated human interactions.

Though this is thorny for Meta, right? They're trying to keep a lot of plates spinning on their part. And more broadly, there's a lot of AI backlash out there right now, including from big names in tech like Steve Wozniak and, of course, Elon Musk.

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- Some of the thorny parts here seem to be that they're releasing this data open source, I believe, to everyone. And I think that that's sort of what Musk and others have been warning about, is you're now putting out this AI data essentially how you're teaching these robots to act like humans out to everyone to grow and learn from, which is normally a good thing in the technology space. But I think it feeds into what the fears are here of we're now teaching everyone how to build robots that might be more powerful than we thought.

ALLIE GARFINKLE: And remember, it's not their robot. It's Boston Dynamics' robot, right? So it's the sort of thing-- well, what does Meta own here really?

SEANA SMITH: Well, yeah. But I also think for them, it's so smart because we have certainly seen the investor reaction to what-- to when Mark Zuckerberg has mentioned AI. And he has had a very, very tough time getting investors on board with his vision of the company over the last year, year and a half.

He mentioned AI. But back in February. And you could see that instant reaction in the stock price. So for them, making it seem like they are pushing further in AI, investing more in that space. Obviously something that will get investors excited.

But you're right. When we talk about so many of the issues that are related to AI right now, the calls here for more regulation. What exactly that should look like.

There's a lot of hesitation. And I'm kind of there. It does scare me a little bit with an AI robot.

- The ticker symbol is already taken this time, Zuck. Sorry.

SEANA SMITH: Yeah.

ALLIE GARFINKLE: For now.

- Keep weighing in, though. We'll get AI-verse soon.