• A pro's top tip to help female introverts at networking
    Yahoo UK Finance Video

    A pro's top tip to help female introverts at networking

    Sue Unerman is the co-author, alongside Kathryn Jacob, of The Glass Wall, a book that offers advice for women seeking success at work.

  • How He Made $2.8M Trading Stocks Part-Time At Home

    How He Made $2.8M Trading Stocks Part-Time At Home

    Kyle Dennis took a leap of faith and decided to invest his savings of $15K in the stock market — $2.8M later, he owes his success to these strategies

  • Women twice as likely as men to be 'discouraged workers' after Covid-19 job loss
    The Guardian

    Women twice as likely as men to be 'discouraged workers' after Covid-19 job loss

    Women twice as likely as men to be 'discouraged workers' after Covid-19 job lossWomen who lost their jobs earlier in coronavirus crisis twice as likely as men to be unemployed and not actively looking for work, survey finds

  • ‘I’ve lost my job and am about to give birth’
    The Telegraph

    ‘I’ve lost my job and am about to give birth’

    It’s supposed to be one of the happiest times of your life, but for many women being pregnant and going on maternity leave during Covid-19 has turned into a nightmare. Hundreds are being told they’re losing their jobs while others are facing having to quit a career they love because they can’t get any childcare. With many schools shut until September, there has been a ripple effect on women's lives. While the government has made great strides in encouraging and supporting women back into work – and saw the country enjoy the economic benefits which came with that, post-pandemic a different picture is emerging – one which many have warned could turn the clock back on women’s progress by several decades. While, pre-pandemic, a record 75 per cent of women in this country had a job, think tank the Institute of Fiscal Studies has found that since lockdown began, mothers are almost 50 per cent more likely than fathers to have lost their job, taken unpaid leave or volunteered to be furloughed, with women also more likely to be caring for an elderly relative as well as children. Not only are women more likely to be working in sectors that have had to shut down during lockdown, including retail and hospitality, research has shown that many who are on or returning from maternity leave have also been illegally singled out for redundancy. One campaigner told the Telegraph that at least 13 new or soon-to-be mothers lost their jobs each day last month. Joeli Brearley of campaign group Pregnant Then Screwed said before lockdown it would usually get around 100 calls a month from pregnant women or new mothers facing issues at work. “Now it’s around 500 calls per month. As the waves of redundancies have started to hit, about 80 per cent of the calls last month were from women who’ve lost their job,” she added. That means at least 400 pregnant women and new mothers were made redundant in June: around 13 each day. There are likely to be many more who have not been in contact with the group.

  • How the UK government furlough scheme is changing
    Yahoo UK Finance Video

    How the UK government furlough scheme is changing

    Yahoo Finance UK's Tom Belger explains changes to the UK job retention scheme, including part-time working on 'flexible' furlough, cuts to government support and their impact on firms and staff.

  • Fujitsu to let employees work from home permanently
    The Telegraph

    Fujitsu to let employees work from home permanently

    Tech giant Fujitsu has committed to halving its office space in Japan within the next three years to facilitate a “new normal” for employees. The company said its 80,000 workers in the country would benefit from flexible hours, and that working from home would become standard practice wherever possible. The changes are part of the company’s “Work Life Shift” initiative, which it hopes will boost innovation and work life balance. “For employees in Japan, this latest initiative will mark the end of the conventional notion of commuting to and from fixed offices, while simultaneously granting them a higher degree of autonomy based on the principle of mutual trust,” Fujitsu said in a statement. The company has also committed to launching satellite offices in areas where employees live, and will sign up with more workspace providers. Fujitsu also said it will introduce a hot desk system where employees are not assigned to a fixed desk. Flexible working hours will be extended to all of Fujitsu’s employees based in Japan. Domestic employees that have been transferred away from home will return and be allowed to handle their work through “telecommuting and business trips”.

  • See Your New House Payment with Quicken Loans

    See Your New House Payment with Quicken Loans

    Mortgage rates have fallen. If you’re paying a mortgage - even if you’ve recently refinanced - you should be considering refinancing for a lower rate.

  • Aviva signals radical overhaul as boss makes sudden exit
    The Telegraph

    Aviva signals radical overhaul as boss makes sudden exit

    Aviva has announced a sudden change of chief executive that could spark a radical overhaul or even a breakup of the £11bn insurer. Amanda Blanc, who joined Aviva as a non-executive director in January, has taken over with immediate effect - replacing Canadian boss Maurice Tulloch, who stepped down from the FTSE 100 firm after only 16 months in the role due to an illness in his family. Ms Blanc previously ran Zurich’s European, Middle East and African operations and did the same for Axa in the UK and Ireland. She promised to deliver a rapid strategic shake-up of the firm following years of poor share price performance and investor fears that with 32,000 staff in 16 countries, it is an unmanageable behemoth. She said: “I’m not a business as usual person and I haven’t come here to do a business as usual job.” Aviva disappointed investors last year after deciding not to pursue either a break-up or a bolder strategy of selling off significant chunks of its business to generate cash for shareholders.

  • Coronavirus: UK firms paid to hire young staff in 'biggest ever' training boost
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: UK firms paid to hire young staff in 'biggest ever' training boost

    The Treasury announced new funds for its traineeship scheme, helping young people into work to tackle growing youth unemployment.

  • The true price of happiness is £34,000
    Yahoo Finance UK

    The true price of happiness is £34,000

    Money does buy happiness — but it’ll cost you almost £34,000 a year.

  • Pubs reopen and weddings back on as lockdown relaxed in England
    PA Media: Video

    Pubs reopen and weddings back on as lockdown relaxed in England

    The first pints have been poured at pubs in England which can now reopen following months of closure as lockdown restrictions are lifted, and weddings have been allowed to resume on a reduced scale.

  • Biggest Transfer of Wealth in US History Has Begun

    Biggest Transfer of Wealth in US History Has Begun

    A Maryland multimillionaire says the biggest legal transfer of wealth in American history has just gotten underway—here’s #1 step you must take.

  • Coronavirus: Job adverts rise as employers step up recruitment
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Job adverts rise as employers step up recruitment

    Adverts for bar and service staff rose in June, ahead of lockdown restrictions lifting.

  • ‘I dropped my sandwich when I found out’: The firms left out on Super Saturday
    PA Media: Money

    ‘I dropped my sandwich when I found out’: The firms left out on Super Saturday

    Gyms, casinos and bowling alleys will not be allowed to open on Saturday as pubs and restaurants welcome customers back.

  • Thousands of shielding workers to be forced out of jobs if furlough scheme is not extended
    The Telegraph

    Thousands of shielding workers to be forced out of jobs if furlough scheme is not extended

    Thousands of workers, including older people and those with health conditions, may be forced out of their jobs when restrictions on those who are shielding for coronavirus begin to lift on August 1. From this point their employer is able to ask them to return to work, even though they continue to face a high risk from Covid-19 and a large proportion of employers have still not put in place measures to protect those returning to work. This could force thousands of vulnerable workers to quit their jobs because they do not feel safe to return, said Frances O’Grady of the Trades Union Congress, a federation of trade unions. “Ministers can’t stand by and let these people lose their jobs and livelihoods. The priority now is making sure people who can’t work through no fault of their own do not lose everything they’ve worked so hard for,” she added. More than half a million (627,000) workers are considered to be particularly vulnerable to coronavirus and currently having to self-isolate. This includes people receiving cancer treatment, those with severe asthma and those who have had an organ transplant. A third of this group (209,000 workers) is currently on furlough as they are unable to work from home, according to the Office for National Statistics. From August 1 in England, they will no longer be required to stay at home and may be asked to return to work. Shielding will continue until at least July 31 in Scotland and August 16 in Wales.

  • Banking chief brought in to develop jobs guarantee for young Scots
    PA Media: Money

    Banking chief brought in to develop jobs guarantee for young Scots

    Sandy Begbie from Tesco Bank is to lead the work, Nicola Sturgeon announced.

  • Monthly Market Commentary | June 2020

    Monthly Market Commentary | June 2020

    E*TRADE pros discuss market happenings.

  • Rolls-Royce aiming to shut pension plan four years early to ease Covid pressure
    The Telegraph

    Rolls-Royce aiming to shut pension plan four years early to ease Covid pressure

    Rolls-Royce is preparing to close its final salary pension scheme four years early to conserve cash as grounded aircraft pile pressure on its finances. The jet engine maker is seeking to end accrual of future benefits now, rather than in 2024. If Rolls gets the go-ahead from pension members and trustees following a consultation, it is likely to save a total of about £500m in contributions. Under the current arrangements, in the last financial year Rolls made total cash contributions to the pension scheme of more than £150m. Cutting payments to the scheme will ease the pressure on Rolls, which has seen demand for its engines and servicing of them collapse. Thursday’s trading update will detail the impact of the pandemic, with analysts forecasting flying hours on its engines could be down by 70pc this year, causing a £3bn cash outflow. Rolls is shedding 9,000 of its 52,000 global employees and has cracked down on all non-essential spending as it battles to survive. Demand for its services is not expected to return to pre-Covid levels until 2025.

  • Retail, travel and hospitality workers ‘could struggle to afford to retire’
    PA Media: Money

    Retail, travel and hospitality workers ‘could struggle to afford to retire’

    Pension savers' long-term prospects are still to a large degree defined by the industry in which they work, Scottish Widows said.

  • US creates 4.8 million jobs as unemployment falls to 11%
    PA Media: Money

    US creates 4.8 million jobs as unemployment falls to 11%

    But the job market recovery may already be faltering because of a new round of closures and job losses triggered by a resurgence of coronavirus.

  • Donald Trump boasts about 4.8 million new jobs as he claims US economy is 'roaring back'
    Evening Standard

    Donald Trump boasts about 4.8 million new jobs as he claims US economy is 'roaring back'

    US President Trump today held a press conference to boast about the jobs increase in June.The US added 4.8 million jobs last month, the biggest increase since records began.

  • The Cannabis Bull Market Is Back

    The Cannabis Bull Market Is Back

    With the global cannabis market valued at just over $15 billion today, the path to $194 billion gives companies and their investors room to run.

  • Coronavirus: NHS workers have 'most important job' –
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: NHS workers have 'most important job' –

    NHS staff should also be entitled to free parking, meals while on duty, increased annual leave and discounted travel, respondents in a survey said.

  • Small businesses pushed to the brink by lockdown: 'We swing from total optimism to total despair'
    The Telegraph

    Small businesses pushed to the brink by lockdown: 'We swing from total optimism to total despair'

    Small businesses across the UK are preparing to reopen their doors on July 4 in the biggest return to freedoms since March 23. However, new social distancing rules will make it impossible for 400,000 firms to reopen, threatening not only their survival, but also Britain's wider economic recovery. We asked how the owners of the UK's independent shops, firms and start-ups were feeling ahead of July 4. They've shared stories of their preparations ahead of 'Super Saturday', including completely adapting their businesses in line with government guidance. They highlighted the support they'd received from the government in the form of grants and bounce back loans. However, they also stressed that the government could be doing more to support the legions of small businesses who risk going under. Is your small business reopening on July 4 or will you remain closed? Share your experience in the comments section at the bottom of this article. Amanda Clegg, massage and aromatherapy clinic owner I have been running my massage and aromatherapy clinic from home and as a mobile therapist since 2001. My business is closed with no client appointments. I have made a very small number of retail sales from my small client base, but not enough to make any sort of living. I have clients that I visit who cannot come to me as they are elderly or disabled. They will suffer (are suffering) hugely through missing out on their regular massage. These are people that I can’t really help using Zoom consultations to work out stretches and self-help, as I can with my younger client base. Sadly, the very small number of online consultations will not earn me a living. I am desperately wading through the guidelines from the Government on PPE, trying to work out what I will be able to do when I am allowed to reopen. It is looking more and more likely there will be a huge increase in operating costs, which I will not be able to pass on to clients. I love my work, and I don’t want to lose it. I have invested a lot – both time and money – in training and ongoing CPD. It’s hugely rewarding on a job satisfaction level. I am 60 and so the prospect of funding any retraining and then having enough working time left to recoup the cost is a bit daunting. Rachel Broadbent, independent coffee shop owner We are an independent coffee shop in Abingdon on Thames. We have managed to furlough all of our staff and have been lucky enough to be eligible for the Government grant scheme and Bounce Back loans. We have been able to reduce overheads considerably, but still have payments that have to be met every month. If we had been unable to reopen on 4 July, we would be really starting to struggle. We have completely redesigned the layout of our shop, including the barista serving area and customer seating to make sure we have sufficient social distancing between all our staff members and the general public. We have spent a great deal of money on PPE and have deep cleaned the shop, including a professional disinfection service. We have done a risk assessment and will be getting all our staff to sign to ensure everyone is happy with the working practises in place. This has entailed a great deal of thought and expense even before we open. We have been lucky to receive the support we have, so in this respect, we are happy. But the speed at which we were originally shut down on Mother's Day weekend meant we had a large amount of stock on site for a potentially busy period. More detail on the furlough schemes and available finance options would have been appreciated sooner. We go through periods of total optimism and total despair. However, the reality is that we will be limited by the number of staff working on-site due to safety regulations. Our business will be very different to the one that we had three to four months ago, and we will have to learn to adapt to what that means. Rod Came, driving instructor I have been an Approved Driving Instructor (ADI) since 1981, when I left Sussex Police. I stopped teaching learner car drivers about 14 years ago and now specialise in assessing and training minibus drivers for independent schools. As I deal solely with independent schools, all of which have been shut down for more than three months, I have carried out no work at all. It is a matter of concern whether my clients will be able to run the pick-up and drop-off home services they previously provided as the social distancing rules would mean that each vehicle would have to carry fewer students. The DVSA (Driving & Vehicles Standards Agency), which has responsibility for providing theory and practical driving tests for learner car drivers, shut down these operations at the start of the Covid-19 outbreak and still have not resumed even a skeleton service for most learner drivers since then. This has resulted in an estimated backlog of 400,000 tests, each of theory and practical. Driving lessons for anything other than essential clients were also terminated. The resumption of driving lessons is of course welcome news to all in the industry, their current clients and those who will now want to be starting or resuming lessons. Pre-lockdown, there were about 40,000 ADIs. I expect that many will have left the industry – possibly as many as 25pc, but even a 10pc reduction would only exacerbate the problem of too many clients and too few providers. There is also the problem for ADIs of keeping themselves and their clients safe from infection. Before each client enters the car, it will have to be sanitised after the previous driver. It is recommended that the windows are kept open, which is impractical when it is raining or the vehicle is being driven at speed. These precautions will result in all ADIs being able to provide fewer lessons per day than they normally would, but with added expense. Many will probably find that it is financially not worthwhile. Russell Donnelly, event production company owner We’re an event production company mainly to the corporate sector and all of our jobs have been cancelled for the rest of the year. We would love to open on July 4, but have no work, so will be closed until what we think will be Feb/ March 2021. That will be 12 months with zero income. We have fixed overheads, including employees that currently remain on furlough. A recently received Bounce Back loan will not cover salaries after the scheme has ended, so people will lose their jobs and I have no income whatsoever. It is obvious that the Government's response to the economic consequences of the pandemic has been formulated by politicians without enough consultation with business representations such as the IoD or Federation of Small Businesses. The individuals and businesses that benefit from the state support will hopefully survive, but the approach is too scattergun, leaving out too many people, [including] business owners who pay themselves through dividends. The employees of these businesses, of which there must be hundreds of thousands, are enjoying the benefit of the furlough scheme, but the owners are only able to claim what small amount that is paid through PAYE, if anything. I would like the Government to extend the self-employment scheme to these business owners so they are able to ride out the crisis. This in turn will help to maintain the staff in employment when the furlough scheme tapers, supporting both employment and the economy. Is your small business reopening on July 4 or will you remain closed? Share your experience in the comments section below

  • Still perplexed by furlough? Here's how to play by the rules
    The Guardian

    Still perplexed by furlough? Here's how to play by the rules

    Still perplexed by furlough? Here's how to play by the rules. Details are still unclear to many. Employment expert Peter Woodhouse spells out your rights and responsibilities

  • Insurer Zurich publishes ethnicity pay gap figures
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Insurer Zurich publishes ethnicity pay gap figures

    Insurance group publishes its ethnicity pay gap figures as part of a pledge to tackle inequality in pay and remove barriers to career progression.

  • This company is transforming home security

    This company is transforming home security

    It's a home security system that's built for the unexpected like downed wifi, cut landlines, power outage, hammers, and everything in between.

  • Fears grow for UK high street as more than 6,000 retail jobs cut in a day
    The Guardian

    Fears grow for UK high street as more than 6,000 retail jobs cut in a day

    Fears grow for UK high street as more than 6,000 retail jobs cut in a day. Harrods and Arcadia shed 1,200 jobs as John Lewis warns of staff and bonus cuts

  • Ryanair pilots to take 20% pay cut after boss Michael O'Leary issues jobs ultimatum
    The Independent

    Ryanair pilots to take 20% pay cut after boss Michael O'Leary issues jobs ultimatum

    Ryanair pilots have agreed a temporary 20 per cent pay cut to limit job losses hours after chief executive Michael O'Leary gave them a public ultimatum.In an interview with the BBC, Mr O'Leary said that 3,000 people would lose their jobs unless all staff agreed to reduce their pay.

  • Where the jobs axe is falling across the UK
    The Telegraph

    Where the jobs axe is falling across the UK

    Companies across Britain have seen their revenues decimated by the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic – and many have begun to announce job cuts ahead of the closure of the Government’s job retention scheme in October. Below is a list of the companies that have axed jobs in the UK since the coronavirus crisis. In total, 110,437 jobs have been lost or are at risk. This does not include a number of companies that have warned of redundancies but have yet to put a figure on them. Antler – 164 jobs Luggage retailer Antler fell into administration in May, cutting 164 jobs of a 199-strong workforce. Administrators said Antler had been “profoundly impacted” by the coronavirus pandemic. Accenture – 900 jobs Consultancy firm Accenture is planning to axe up to 900 jobs in the UK as the firm tries to cut costs to deal with the fallout from coronavirus. Accenture is a US firm headquartered in New York, but it employs more than 10,000 people in the UK. Airbus – 1,700 jobs Airbus is to cut 15,000 jobs globally as the plane-maker slashes staff numbers to match the collapse in demand for new aircraft. Of these jobs, some 1,700 will go in the UK. Guillaume Faury, Airbus chief executive, said: “Airbus is facing the gravest crisis this industry has ever experienced.” Arcadia – 500 jobs Sir Philip Green’s retail empire Arcadia is slashing 500 roles from its 2,500-strong head office workforce to help it weather the Covid storm. Aston Martin – 500 jobs Aston Martin is preparing to cut 500 jobs as the carmaker restructures under its new management. BBC – 450 jobs The BBC is to cut 450 jobs in its English regional TV news and current affairs, local radio and online news. The broadcaster said it would cut roughly 15pc of its BBC England team, as it seeks to bolster its balance sheet amid the coronavirus crisis. Bentley Motors – 1,000 jobs Bentley Motors is seeking to lay off up to 1,000 staff – almost a quarter of its workforce – through a voluntary redundancy programme in return for a severance payment. British Airways – up to 12,000 British Airways is to shed as many as 12,000 jobs after plunging to its worst ever quarterly loss and admitting air travel will take years to recover from a global collapse. Irish airline Aer Lingus, which is also part of IAG, along with BA and Iberia, has been forced to cut 900 jobs.

  • Ryanair pilots agree to 20% pay cut in attempt to limit job losses
    The Guardian

    Ryanair pilots agree to 20% pay cut in attempt to limit job losses

    Ryanair pilots agree to 20% pay cut in attempt to limit job lossesAccepting temporary pay cut is ‘right thing to do’ after collapse in demand, says pilots’ union * Coronavirus – latest updates * See all our coronavirus coverage

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